Posts Tagged: Orvis

R.O.A.R. to Bring Stray Puppies Back to Health

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blaze

Give to us through Global Giving from 10/14-11/12 and have double the impact for homeless dogs like Blaze.

When you donate to us through Global Giving from Oct. 14-Nov. 12, you’ll help twice as many stray puppies in need of medical treatment like Blaze (above).

For those 30 days, Animal Planet’s R.O.A.R. is matching donations to the Petfinder Foundation dollar-for-dollar (learn more about the campaign here). That means a second chance for stray puppies like Blaze and her sister Rose, who were covered in fleas and ticks when they were saved by Fluvanna SPCA (FSPCA) in Troy, Va. Director Jennie Shuklis tells us:

roze

Rose

“FSPCA is a no-kill shelter, and we work with EVERY dog or cat in our care to help them find a home. This often requires medical treatments, treating conditions that owners believed were beyond the scope of their care and thus resulting in relinquishment or abandonment. Most of the dogs we receive are highly adoptable after medical and behavioral rehabilitation, and this grant helped us realize that goal for some of our friends.

“Roze and Blaze came to us as stray hound-mix puppies, only 6 weeks old, covered with fleas and ticks. They’re a pair of gentle, fun-loving sisters who only wanted to cuddle and play. The grant was able to help us work on grooming them, getting rid of all the ticks and scabs, as well as providing them with spays as they got older to make them more adoptable. Once they were healthier, they were put up for adoption and adopted to wonderful families within a matter of days.”

Punkin and many other dogs across the country have been helped by our Orvis operation grant program.

Donate to us through Global Giving from Oct. 14-Nov. 12 to double your impact!

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A Maltipoo Is Thrown Over a Shelter Fence

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Tippy Sits in the Grass

Tippy is available for adoption at k9.5 Rescue.

When Tippy the Maltipoo was thrown over a six-foot-high shelter fence onto concrete, our grant from Orvis — which matches donations dollar-for-dollar up to $30,000 — arrived just in time for k9.5 Rescue in Greenville, S.C., to save her life.

“She was literally on the verge of death, with a heart rate of 36,” k9.5 President Allison Rathert tells us. “During a period when we only had a few hundred dollars in the bank and an emergency-room fund that was soon to be maxed out as a result of Tippy’s visit, the $1,000 grant allowed us to cover a life-threatening crash and do what we needed to do to save her.”

The 2-year-old dog’s left hip was completely out of its socket, and she suffered nerve damage, too, Rathert says. Tippy spent three days in critical care. Veterinarians also diagnosed her with Addison’s disease, an adrenal condition that affects dogs like Tippy for life.

Despite her acute injuries, chronic condition and the past abuse she suffered, Tippy was cheerful, affectionate and friendly. After three days in the hospital, she entered a foster home for an extended recovery and is up for adoption (learn about adopting Tippy here).

“Tippy is currently doing remarkably well and responding to her medication,” Rathert says. “She is back to her feisty, active and joyful self.”

Bryson Sitting in the Sunlight

Now that his eye has healed, Bryson is available for adoption from k9.5 Rescue.

After paying for Tippy’s care, k9.5 still had $200 in grant funds remaining. Rathert says she put that money toward medical treatment for Bryson, a 2½-year-old Great Pyrenees suffering from entropion. The painful eye condition caused Bryson’s lower eyelid to curl inward and scratch his cornea.

“Bryson has recovered successfully and his eye looks fantastic,” Rathert says. “He has not squinted or had drainage since.”

We’re proud that our grant allowed k9.5 to help these two beautiful dogs.

“The joy and immense relief that flooded me upon opening the envelope simply cannot be described accurately,” Rathert says. “It was literally a lifesaver.”

Help us save more homeless pets like Tippy and Bryson!

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Saving a Pregnant Pit Bull and Her Puppies

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Sunny is available for adoption

Sunny is available for adoption at Utah Animal Adoption Center.

When Utah Animal Adoption Center in Salt Lake City rescued a very pregnant Pit Bull from an abusive situation, our grant from Orvis — which matches donations dollar-for-dollar up to $30,000 — helped pay for the mother’s and her seven puppies’ medical care.

“Sunny was extremely malnourished,” Resource Development Director Samantha Johnson tells us. “You could see her ribs.”

Despite being badly mistreated, Sunny had a gentle and loving temperament that endeared her to the staff. Five days after the shelter took Sunny in, they helped her have her pups.

“She was the sweetest thing ever,” Lead Shelter Assistant Lindsay Ortega says. “She let us assist her, she let us rub her belly, she let us clean her babies off. She was the best momma.”

One of Sunny's seven puppies.

One of Sunny’s seven puppies

The grant helped the shelter pay for Sunny’s spay as well as her puppies’ spay/neuter surgeries, microchips and vaccinations. Johnson tells us that the organization took in 1,175 animals last year and found homes for 1,139 of them.

“Our ability to take on a pregnant animal, rehabilitate her, and find homes for her puppies is greatly impacted by the funding we received from Petfinder Foundation,” Johnson says.

Four of Sunny's seven puppies; all are up for adoption at Utah Animal Adoption Center.

Three of Sunny’s seven puppies

Donate to help homeless pets, and Orvis will match your gift!

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Saving Roxy the Stray and Her Puppies

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Thanks to your donations and a matching grant from Orvis, a stray mama dog named Roxy and her puppies were saved by staff at Ponca City Humane Society in Oklahoma. We got this grant report from Executive Director Patricia Amador:

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Roxy is ready to play.

“We were contacted back in the beginning of March of this year by an individual who had found a stray who had had puppies behind our local skate park. We at that time did not have room to take the stray and her puppies in, but we were able to secure the person who found them to keep them on a temporary basis as a foster.

“She was able to house them but began to inform us that her neighbor was trying to take the mother dog, now named Roxy. Roxy sadly was stolen from foster’s yard on March 17. Her puppies, who were still nursing, where found scattered in the driveway of the home. Luckily, the foster was able to locate all eight puppies. We scrambled for fosters and were able to find two that were willing to take the puppies in. They were fostered for roughly two weeks and returned to our facility. Roxy was eventually found at our local animal control and we were able to reclaim her from there.

“The puppies, unfortunately, had been exposed to parvovirus, although only five came down with the disease. All were admitted into our local vet and aggressive treatment was started. Sadly, we lost three of the female puppies. We were saddened that even with aggressive treatment we were unable to save them all.

Roxy Babies

Roxy’s puppies

“The remaining puppies recovered well and the first puppy from that litter, Disco, was adopted on March 8. The second, Buster, was adopted on March 10. Disco went home with a lovely young lady, while Buster, now named Ace, was adopted by a father, son and daughter team. We wish them all the best in their new homes. Roxy and the remaining three puppies are waiting to find their forever homes. We welcome anyone interested in them to contact us.

“We would like to give the Petfinder Foundation a huge thank you for the generous Orvis grant. We are a 501(c)(3) non-profit no-kill small humane society that does not receive any government funding and relies on the good will and generosity of individuals, corporations, and adopters and donors to keep us going.”

Learn more about adopting Roxy here!

Meet Roxy’s puppies who are still waiting for forever homes:

Hank

Pepper

Linus
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No-Fee Adoptions Help Ten Lucky Colorado Dogs

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Ten patiently waiting pooches — including a pair of bonded rat terriers — have found families thanks to an Orvis grant the Petfinder Foundation awarded to a shelter in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Buddy, left, and Lucky were adopted together.

“This grant enabled us to waive adoption fees for ten of our ‘harder to place’ dogs,” Marsha Rana Wayman, Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region grants and corporate relations manager, tells us.

This extra adoption incentive helped recruit one loving home for both Buddy and Lucky, two 5-year-old rat terriers who were surrendered when their owner’s health faltered.

“Buddy and Lucky were not only featured as a two-for-one bonded pair — their single adoption fee of $65 was completely waived,” Wayman says. “The pair was happily adopted after a mere five days at the shelter!”

Percy’s foster family adopted him.

The grant also helped ensure a happy ending for Percy, who was brought into HSPPR as a stray with a badly fractured leg. Shelter staff immediately treated Percy’s painful injury and pursued his case as a cruelty investigation, Wayman says.

After Percy spent months recovering in a loving foster home, his foster family signed on to keep him for life. Not only did the grant underwrite Percy’s waived adoption fee, it helped pay for the medical care he needed, Wayman says.

Learn more about Petfinder Foundation grants that could help your shelter or rescue group.

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How Did Five ‘Hard-to-Place’ Dogs Find Homes?

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Dart was adopted thanks to a grant from the Petfinder Foundation and Orvis.

We received this grant report from Peg Zappen at Coulee Region Humane Society in Onalaska, WI. The shelter received a grant from the Petfinder Foundation and Orvis, which for the second year in a row is matching your donations to the Petfinder Foundation dollar-for-dollar up to $30,000. (Donate now and double your impact!)

Choodle

“Several dogs with special needs got boosts toward adoptability. We used grant funds for extra veterinary care that removed obstacles to adoption for these dogs.

Dart is a 6-year-old male pug cross who is very social, loves to give kisses and had very bad breath. His teeth were so bad that adopters were reluctant to look at him very seriously. Thanks to you, lucky Dart got his very bad teeth cleaned, a tooth extracted and was neutered. He now has a sweet smile and has been adopted.

“Choodle is a male poodle/Chihuahua cross who loves to be dressed in sweaters and cuddled but sadly suffered from bad teeth and very bad breath. Choodle also benefited from having his teeth cleaned and needed dental extraction completed and was neutered. He became much more appealing and is now in his forever home.

Wyatt

“Wyatt is a male redbone coonhound — a common dog in this part of the country — surrendered because he was missing a foot. Wyatt was neutered, which is just what it took to make it easier to place him. He is now living in a coonhound-loving home.

“Sweet Maggie is an 8-year-old beagle with too many strikes against her, including epilepsy. Thanks to you, she had seven teeth extracted, improving her prospects for long-term good health. An adopter with experience with an epileptic dog saw her, saw the work that had been done for her and wanted to keep her run of good luck going by taking her home forever.

“Pee Wee is a charming, snuggly Chihuahua mix who was surrendered to us by a man who was devastated because he had accidentally hurt this dog. This gentleman was dog-sitting Pee Wee for a friend and accidentally stepped on Pee Wee’s leg and broke it. The man had dogs of his own and was not accustomed to having a small dog underfoot. He offered to pay for half of the veterinary care for Pee Wee, but the owner said Pee Wee was not worth spending money on and wouldn’t take him back. Our gentleman already had all the dogs he could manage, could not truly afford any vet care, and brought Pee Wee to us.

Maggie

“We turned to the Petfinder Foundation’s Orvis grant funds for help. A local vet x-rayed Pee Wee’s leg, found a fracture that required surgery and performed the surgery for less than $250. A vet tech is providing foster care until Pee Wee can be safely adopted out.

“These five dogs would not be in such good shape, with such good fortune and hope, without you. Thank you so very much.”

Donate today and Orvis will match your gift to help more dogs like these find forever homes!

 

 

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A Shelter Saves Two Victims of Severe Cruelty

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Adele, as she looks today. She’s waiting for her forever home at Greater Charlotte SPCA. Learn more about adopting her here.


We have some exciting news: For the second year in a row, Orvis is matching donations to the Petfinder Foundation dollar-for-dollar up to $30,000. This means the world to pets like Adele.

Adele the day she was rescued

Adele was rescued by Greater Charlotte SPCA, which used Orvis funds to help pay for her rehabilitation. Here’s what GCSPCA president Alex Wilson told us on Dec. 27:

Several of the puncture wounds on Adele’s face were infected.

“Thank you so much for the grant. We are going to use some of the money to help Adele. Adele was found as a stray on the side of the road today. She is terribly thin and covered in bite wounds and several of the punctures in her face are badly infected.

“She currently has a 104-degree temperature from the infection caused by the bite wounds she suffered from we believe, being a bait dog. Our vet is actually fostering her because she is going to need quite a bit of care (she will live in his home).

“We do not turn these dogs away when we receive a plea. We always try to figure out how to pay after we say yes. The grant will help us to not worry as much about saying yes.”

We recently asked Wilson for an update on Adele. She told us: “Adele is a super sweet and happy girl. She is great with people, even young kids. She is actually very energetic now and loves to run and play in the yard.” One potential adoption didn’t work out; understandably, for a former bait dog, Adele has some issues with other dogs and is now waiting for the perfect home in which she’ll be the only pet.

Ethan, found riddled with shotgun pellets, was also helped by the Orvis grant.

Wilson also told us the Orvis grant helped cover the care of another cruelty case, a dog named Ethan. “Ethan was found as a stray, heartworm-positive, with a deep cut on his face and his body was full of shotgun pellets,” she said. “He is still a very sweet and happy-go-lucky guy and he is in one of our foster homes recovering as well.

“We have had a lot of medical emergency cases recently and normally we have to be careful about taking on too many at once, but the grant has allowed us to take on more than we normally could. We are incredibly grateful for your generosity.”

Learn more about adopting Adele here.

Learn more about adopting Ethan here.

Donate today and Orvis will match your gift dollar-for-dollar so shelters and rescue groups can help more pets like Adele and Ethan.

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Betsy’s Story

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Betsy

Teresa Calafut of Uniondale, PA, is one of the many generous donors who gave to the Petfinder Foundation through Orvis, which all this year has been matching donations dollar-for-dollar (learn more or donate now).

Nearly everyone who gives to the Petfinder Foundation has a deeply personal reason for doing so, and when we learned that Teresa had donated part of the settlement she’d received after her dog Betsy was shot by a hunter, we felt she deserved to tell her story — both as a cautionary tale to fellow pet parents and as a way to honor Betsy’s memory.

I asked Teresa what advice she would offer our readers to help them avoid a similar tragedy. “Remember that there is always the possibility that a hunter is near where you and your dog are hiking,” she said. “Hunting regulations are different in each state, and you need to know what they are for yours. In Pennsylvania, coyotes can be shot any day of the year so there is always a risk. But most of the hunting takes place in the fall; I don’t take the dogs anywhere from September to January unless hunting is prohibited, and they always wear bright orange jackets (from the Orvis catalog). And be aware that hunting is allowed in places you wouldn’t necessarily expect, like state parks in Pennsylvania.”

Here is Betsy’s story in Teresa’s own words:

Betsy with her Frisbee

Betsy’s adoption and personality

Betsy was a collie mix; she looked like she was part collie, part golden retriever with other breeds mixed in. She was born in March 2005 in North Carolina and she and her brother were rescued from a shelter when they were very young.

I started looking for a dog about that time; I’d had cats for over 20 years but had not had a dog as an adult. I wanted a puppy whom I could raise and be with for many years, through her adulthood and old age. I was kind of looking for a collie-type dog since that is what we had growing up, a mutt who needed a home. A friend at work told me about Petfinder.com, where I found Chicklet, soon to be named Betsy.

When Betsy was 3 months old, the rescue group brought her and a bunch of other dogs up to a rest stop in Carlisle, PA, just south of Harrisburg, and I made the three-hour drive to get her. After I paid the balance of her adoption fee, the rescue person put little Betsy into my arms and I had a dog, a little ball of fluff who just wanted to sit on my lap. I drove the whole way home with her on my lap, then sat on the porch and carried her around the house. She must have been tired and stressed out from the long ride. She slept a lot, then started looking around. Later in the day she helped me plant flowers by digging a hole and she found some sticks to chew and pull. I had prepared a place for her with a bed, toys and water, but she was only interested in following me around.

She grew. I’d had in mind a medium-sized dog, but Betsy had big paws and grew into them, to be about 50 lbs. She was light brown, with some white on her chest, paws and rump and some black on her tail. She was very energetic and a very picky eater and was always thin. But she loved treats and the bones I made for her once a week. She had long fur with curly tendrils around her ears, a long collie nose, and one of her ears sometimes flopped over.

I took her most places with me: to the grocery store, visiting friends and relatives, for ice cream, to dog classes at Petco. She liked to sit in the front seat and look out the window. In the grocery store parking lot, people would laugh at seeing her sitting in the driver’s seat staring straight ahead, as if she were driving. She liked to walk in her wading pool and would swim or walk in the water in ponds and streams. She liked to walk and sometimes sit in the mud; once she almost got stuck in quicksand. I tried to train her to sit in the canoe with me, but she kept jumping in the water and swimming alongside.

Betsy on the couch

She liked to sleep on the couch and on the bed. She got along well with the cats and liked to play with their toys sometimes. She loved their laser toy and would go crazy chasing it. And she really liked their cat food.

She liked to play with sticks and balls, especially fetch, and she liked to tear her toys apart and find the squeaker. But her favorite toy was a Frisbee. She was obsessed; she would play for hours and hours, bringing the Frisbee back and dropping it at someone’s feet; if they didn’t respond, she would nudge it with her nose and stare at it fixedly. She brought Frisbees to anyone who was around and took them for walks and in the car. I kept buying new ones as they were chewed up or disappeared and found a few Frisbees in the yard or field after she died.

We went for walks every day in the field and pasture behind my house. She wasn’t interested in the horses but did get sprayed by skunks a few times. Sometimes we would go for longer hikes in local parks; longer hikes tired her out and she slept a lot the next day, giving me a rest from being continually bumped with a Frisbee. We went camping and hiking in the Adirondack Park in New York; she seemed to enjoy seeing new places and things. Of course she always brought her Frisbee. She was a sweet dog, never ran off anywhere, and everybody always liked her.

Betsy’s last hike

On October 26, 2007, Betsy and I and a group of seven hikers were hiking near Slate Run in the Pine Creek area of central Pennsylvania. Betsy was glad to get out of the car and was running around exploring the woods near the trailhead. There were no signs near the trailhead except the trail sign, no warnings of possible hunters in the area. We started up the Pine Trail, a rugged, steep trail up Hemlock Mountain, then stopped for lunch once we reached the top. As usual, Betsy kept running around while everyone else rested, and I played tug and fetch with her with sticks. Then we started up again along the ridge of the mountain, on Big Trail Road, a grassy, little-used road. Betsy found a puddle and enjoyed walking in it. I waited for her but the others kept on, and she ran to take the lead again. If only she had stayed a minute longer in the puddle. I was in the back of the group.

Up ahead, Betsy stopped at an interesting smell and was there for what seemed like a few minutes. On our right was a wooded area and the steep slope of the mountain; on the left was a more gradual downward slope with an open, brushy hill. Where the hikers were, a large bush on the left prevented a view of the hill on the left, but Betsy, about 30 feet ahead, was in the open area.

It was fast. Someone in the front of the group said, “There’s a hunter,” and immediately I was past the bush to see a hunter aiming a long gun at my Betsy. He was wearing camouflage, without any noticeable orange or reflective wear. I screamed; people shouted, “Don’t shoot!” Then I heard a pop. Betsy was still standing; I thought maybe he missed, but then she took a few steps and fell over on the other side of the road in some grass and leaves. The hunter came over to look at her, I screamed at him to get away from her. He said he thought she was a coyote. We learned later that he was using a scope. He shot her from a distance of about 40 feet. Betsy was shot in the abdomen and back area on her right side. She was shot at about 1:30 p.m.

The hunter said he would go get his truck to take her to a vet and he left. We didn’t know if he would return or not. One of the hikers tried to call 911, but could not get cell reception. Someone started to make a litter from branches and jackets so we could carry her down. Two others bushwacked down through the woods to get help. Another hiker and I sat by Betsy, petting her and talking to her. I tried to stay calm. My life was falling apart.

The hunter came back up the road. The remaining hikers and I put Betsy in the back of the truck and climbed in the back. We drove to a tavern/campground where there were a lot other people around. A woman who said that she was a former army medic looked at Betsy and said that she did not think the wound was severe and applied pressure to Betsy’s wound. Betsy was bleeding onto the bed of the truck. The hunter called around for a vet and located one 30 miles away near Williamsport. The hunter and I went to the vet; the other hikers stayed at the tavern/campground. Two volunteered to drive my car to the vet’s office.

Someone moved Betsy to the floor of the cab of the truck and I sat on the seat above her. The hunter drove fast down the winding road, racing toward the vet, who was waiting outside to meet us. The hunter and the vet carried Betsy inside. There was a trail of blood; there was blood all over. The vet did x-rays and examined her, and then came to talk to me. He said that Betsy had internal bleeding, and that the bullet had fragmented into pieces inside of Betsy. The vet recommended surgery to remove the bullet fragments. The surgery began at 4:30 p.m. and I waited alone in the waiting room until the two hikers who brought my car arrived. They waited with me in the waiting room.

When the surgery was completed, the vet came out and told us that he had removed 14 inches of Betsy’s lower colon and stitched up other sections of her colon. The 14-inch piece was too damaged to save. He removed as many bullet fragments as he could, but couldn’t get them all. Betsy’s stomach also had holes in it. She’d lost a lot of blood; they had to give her three pints. From losing so much blood, her core temperature had dropped and they had her on a heating pad to warm her up again. They had one tube draining from her stomach and another tube draining from her side. He said the first 12 hours were going to be the hardest time for her.

I wanted to stay overnight with Betsy, but the vet told me I couldn’t. Instead, I stayed overnight at a local hotel. In the morning, I called the vet and heard that Betsy had died at 2:00 a.m., in her sleep.

The shooting was investigated by the chief ranger for Tiadaghton State Forest and the report transferred to the Pennsylvania Game Commission. The hunter was to be cited for shooting on or across a highway, shooting at game near a road ($100-300 fine), damage to property (Betsy, a fine of $75-200), and damages ($1,700 veterinary bill). The hunter lost his license for one year.

I had a lot of trouble dealing with the representative from the game commission; I got the impression the game commission existed only to protect hunters. The representative I dealt with was difficult to contact; he said he was busy with bear season. He put me off when I requested copies of statements made by other hikers, a copy of the citation or his report of “damage by gunfire.” He never sent them, and kept losing the fax I sent him of the veterinary bill. I got the impression he knew the hunter, and I was dissatisfied with the penalties for killing Betsy. Also I hoped that a court case would set some sort of precedent someone could use in the future so that eventually hunting penalties would be more in line with the crimes committed.

I had trouble finding a lawyer — most said you could only sue for the price of the “property” –- but finally found someone who would sue for damages and infliction of emotional distress. The legal process was slow and stressful, with questionnaires, depositions, evaluations, pretrial meetings, jury selection and finally a settlement meeting. The hunter had hunting insurance and was represented by a team of lawyers from a Philadelphia firm. I took the settlement, not knowing at the time that a settlement could not be cited in a future brief.

I didn’t want the money from the settlement and decided to donate it to pet charities. I had planned to donate to the Petfinder Foundation, and when Orvis said it would match a donation, I sent in a check.

Gracie

Gracie and Millie

I was devastated after Betsy died. It was hard to get up in the morning and get through the day. An animal communicator I contacted said there was a dog out there who needed me and Betsy would send me a dog, a collie with a white blaze down her nose and white under her chin and on her chest and belly.

I started looking at the dogs who needed homes on Petfinder and thought I would like to adopt two dogs someday, since two dogs was the most I thought I could handle, and young or older dogs and not puppies, since puppies find homes more easily. After a few weeks of looking, I found myself drawn to a collie mix at Collie Concern Rescue in Tennessee. I printed out her picture and kept looking at it several times during the day. Every morning I would look her up on Petfinder. Finally one day I called about her and found out she was born in March 2007, had been rescued from a shelter in August, and was now in foster care. I went through the application process and a few weeks later, just before the holidays, I drove down to Tennessee between snow and ice storms to bring her home with me. She was smaller than Betsy, about 35 lbs., with orange-brown fur, white on her chest, stomach and tail, and with a white blaze down her nose.

Gracie was a happy dog but she had lived with other dogs in her foster home and I thought she would like another dog in the family. In the spring I contacted Collie Concern Rescue and in July I adopted a sable and white rough collie who had been found wandering near someone’s home. They thought she was a young dog, a few years old. I picked her up in Allentown, PA, this time, meeting the dog transport from Tennessee there at 4:00 in the morning. Gracie and Millie got along really well right from the start, and both seemed to like having another dog around.

Gracie and Millie go for car rides, walks and hikes and play together or with their friends. Gracie is 5 this year and Millie maybe around 7 years old. Gracie is a high-energy dog, high-strung and bouncy, and Millie is calm and serene. They are my best friends and I hope we have many more years together.

Teresa with Gracie (left) and Millie

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