Posts Tagged: Summer Cooling

Arizona Dogs Say Thank You for Summer Cooling Grant!

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Adoptable Skylar enjoys a yard that’s been improved with turf, a shade and a misting system.

Our Summer Cooling Grant is helping dogs at Humane Society of Southern Arizona in Tucson keep cool via a new misting system in its yard.

Shelter PR Coordinator Sara Gromley tells us, “Here are some photos of our new area we spruced up thanks to your summer cooling grant. The mister system is absolutely deluxe! It goes from scorching hot to tropical cool within seconds of flipping a switch. Staff members enjoy taking breaks by bringing dogs out in the yard and it’s actually pleasant to be outdoors! The dogs love the turf and the shade sail works perfectly. Petfinder Foundation, we love you!”

Before the turf

The yard before the new turf was added

Gromley adds, “The dog model is Skylar, #757011, a 5-year-old male golden retriever mix. He was found as a stray and has been waiting for a home since early June (which I believe is against the laws of nature, when you’re a golden retriever).”

Donate to help us keep shelter pets cool and Orvis will match your gift!

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Our Cooling Grants Help Homeless Donkeys Too!

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We're helping keep Storm E. the donkey cool this summer.

Storm E. has a condition called string halt which causes her to walk funny, but with minimal pain.

We’re keeping homeless dogs — and donkeys — safe this summer, thanks to your support of our Summer Cooling Campaign.

Lusco Farms Rescue in Malvern, Iowa, and HOPE Animal Shelter in Tucson are the latest recipients of Summer Cooling grants. Each has received $1,000 to help keep the animals in their care cool, comfortable and safe in the heat.

For Lusco Farms Rescue, that means donkeys like Storm E., who came there with multiple medical issues caused by a lifetime of poor nutrition, will finally have new, shaded lean-tos in her pasture.

“Because we’ll have more areas covered with shade, we can take in more donkeys,” Lusco Farms President Lura Shehan tells us.

Many of the group’s donkeys come from people who acquired them as pets without thoroughly researching the care the animals need, she says. Still more come from cattle ranchers, who purchased the donkeys to protect their herds but lost the herds when the economy worsened.

In Tucson, HOPE Animal Shelter will use its grant to install a new misting system and sunshades so dogs can be cool in their outdoor runs.

“It has been over 100 degrees for 24 days in a row,” Executive Director Susan Scherl tells us. “Because of our hard water, the inexpensive mister we currently use keeps getting clogged.”

Our Executive Director Lisa Robinson with Rizzo from HOPE Animal Shelter

Our executive director, Lisa Robinson, chills with Rizzo, an affectionate 10-year-old at HOPE Animal Shelter in Tucson.

The improvements will help dogs like Rizzo, above, get more socialization and exercise time outdoors. HOPE has a soft spot for senior dogs, Scherl says, so she works with other local shelters to take in older dogs who are at great risk of euthanasia. She also takes in abused and abandoned dogs like Evie, below, who was tied to the shelter’s fence overnight and spends many hours in its outdoor runs.

Evie is waiting at HOPE Animal Shelter.

Evie waited for days for the person who abandoned her at HOPE Animal Shelter to return.

“We don’t have air conditioning, so anything that can cool off the dogs outside in this Tucson heat is wonderful,” Scherl says. “The misters will be a great addition.”

Donate to help us keep more pets safe and cool this summer, and Orvis will match your gift!
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Cooling Grant a ‘Game-Changer’ for Tucson Shelter Dogs

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BEAR - pacc

Bear cools off at Pima Animal Care Center in Tucson, Ariz.

Your donations to our Summer Cooling Campaign are saving lives at Pima Animal Care Center (PACC) in Tucson, Ariz., by helping the dogs there get adopted. The shelter used our Summer Cooling grant to install an overhead misting system in two visitation yards, meaning potential adopters can now comfortably spend time getting to know the resident dogs.

“It’s a game-changer,” Animal Care Advocate Justin Gallick tells us. Here in Tucson, temperatures have already topped 111 degrees, and before the outdoor misting system was installed, potential adopters did not have a cool, comfortable place in which to visit with the shelter’s dogs. “Now they can take the time necessary to make that bond,” Gallick says.

Two brother kittens enjoyed catsicles at PACC.

Enjoying catsicles at PACC

As part of Petfinder’s Summer Pet Safety campaign, we’ve challenged Petfinder.com visitors to help us raise $10,000 to keep 10,000 shelter pets cool and safe. (You can donate here to help.) PACC’s grant was possible because of your donations, and it is making a big difference to the shelter’s adoption numbers, Gallick says. (Find out how pets are keeping cool at our first Summer Cooling grant recipient, Humane Society of Southern Arizona.)

When we visited PACC to check out its new misters, we brought along kiddie pools for each of the yards. We also made cooling catsicles to share with the shelter’s cats (get the recipe for catsicles here), and pupsicles that we made by freezing low-sodium chicken broth in an ice cube tray.

Tipper loved her pupsicle.

Tipper loves her pupsicle.

The grant came at just the right time, since the shelter – which takes in nearly 25,000 lost and homeless pets a year – is currently being inundated with unwanted litters (read our previous blog post about PACC).

“It’s raining puppies and kittens,” Adoption Coordinator Ellie Beaubien says.

Adelle was adopted the afternoon after she enjoyed pool fun in PACC's visiting yards.

Adelle has since been adopted.

While the misters in the visitation yards certainly make adopters more comfortable, they also give the shelter’s nursing-mother dogs a place to take a break from their puppies, Beaubien says. Before the summer, staff members would give each nursing mother half an hour of exercise and fresh air in the yards – but when the high temperatures arrived, that became too dangerous.

Now, thanks to the misting system, “nobody’s getting overheated,” Beaubien says. “We really needed those. It was a great investment.”

Donate to help us keep 10,000 homeless pets cool, and Orvis will match your gift!

 

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Help Us Keep 10,000 Shelter Pets Cool this Summer!

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Samantha Esquivel and Sara Gromley from the Humane Society of Southern Arizona share frozen treats with adoptable Benson.

HSSA‘s Samantha Esquivel, left, and Sara Gromley share homemade frozen dog treats with adoptable Benson.

As part of Petfinder’s Summer Pet Safety campaign, we’re challenging Petfinder.com visitors to help us raise $10,000 to help keep 10,000 shelter pets cool and safe this summer. (Donate to keep shelter pets cool here.)

Dewey loved playing in the kiddie pool.

Dewey plays in the kiddie pool.

The funds raised will go towards Summer Cooling grants to help shelters purchase misters, sun shades and other cooling devices.

We visited the first grant recipient, the Humane Society of Southern Arizona (HSSA), this week. HSSA, which takes in about 10,000 pets each year, received $1,000 to help keep its animal residents cool as temperatures in Tucson hit triple digits over the summer. HSSA Public Relations Lead Samantha Esquivel showed us some of the ways the shelter keeps pets comfortable in hot weather (and you can too):

Benson Frolics

Benson cools off in a kiddie pool.

1. Fresh, cool water – for both drinking and playing in – is key for keeping dogs like Benson, a 9-year-old flat-coated retriever, safe and happy. Not only does Benson benefit from HSSA’s overhead misting system, he loves the shelter’s sprinklers and kiddie pool, which you can set up at home.

2. Homemade frozen treats – such as a Kong toy stuffed with peanut butter and kibble stuck in the freezer for several hours – are an easy way to keep your pet entertained and cool. You can try our recipe for catsicles to give your feline friends a frosty, tasty snack.

3. Shade sources – such as trees, dog houses or the sunshades HSSA uses in its visiting yards – are crucial when your pet is outside. But even if plenty of shade is available, be sure to limit your pet’s time outdoors and watch closely for signs of heatstroke (learn the symptoms of heatstroke).

Sibling 9-week-old kittens Emmit, left, and Lily enjoyed their catsicles.

Emmit, left, and Lily enjoy their catsicles.

“The best part of our dogs’ day is when they get to let loose in the visiting yard with volunteers, but we always have to be vigilant about heat and usually cut playtime short,” HSSA Public Relations Coordinator Sara Gromley tells us. “Thanks to a grant from the Petfinder Foundation, we’re able to extend the fun!”

Robbie the 1 1/2-year-old Red Tabby loved his catsicle treat.

Robbie, a red tabby, loves his catsicle.

Check out Petfinder.com’s Summer Pet Safety campaign for more cooling tips.

Are you with a Petfinder member shelter? Apply for a Summer Cooling grant here.

Donate to help us keep 10,000 homeless pets cool and Orvis will match your gift!

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Delivering a Grant — and Meeting Shelter Pets — in Tucson

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Lisa Walks Nina the Adoptable Dog

Petfinder Foundation Executive Director Lisa Robinson walks Nina, a Pit Bull mix, at Pima Animal Care Center in Tucson.

Once in a while, we like to deliver a grant in person. So this week we headed to one of our local Tucson shelters, Pima Animal Care Center (PACC), to present a $1,000 Summer Cooling grant. The funds will be used to install a misting system in the shelter’s meet-and-greet yards and outdoor dog runs to make both more comfortable for the pets and potential adopters.

While we were there, we also spent some time walking a few of the resident dogs — including Nina (above) — and speaking with staff and volunteers about the positive changes the shelter is making. We left feeling prouder than ever to be supporting its work.

Animal Care Advocate Justin Gallick tells us that the county-funded facility, which takes in nearly 25,000 homeless or lost pets a year, is undertaking a radical outlook shift.

“Our culture, and reputation, has for years been based on the animal-control model,” he says. “Now there’s a lot more emphasis on customer service, finding the right match and post-adoption follow-up.”

Justin with Snookums the Puppy

PACC’s Justin Gallick snuggles with Snookums, a 6-week-old Pit Bull.

The organization recently increased its live-release rate from around 50 percent to nearly 65 percent, Gallick says, adding that he expects that number to continue to rise. In the past, PACC did not have a staff member dedicated solely to increasing adoptions, but it recently hired its first full-time adoption coordinator, Ellie Beaubien. It also hired its first full-time volunteer coordinator, José Ocaño. Since February, Ocaño has increased PACC’s volunteer force from 90 people to more than 300.

When it was time for us to walk dogs, two of the shelter’s regular volunteers, Laura Hines and Kainan Jarrette, paired us with pups who needed exercise. PACC is situated next to a small lake – a rare sight in the desert! – and devoted volunteers such as Hines and Jarrette ensure PACC’s temporary residents enjoy daily excursions around the water.

Foundation Walks Dogs Around the Lake

Petfinder Foundation Senior Program Manager Toni Morgan, Robinson and PACC volunteers Laura Hines and Kainan Jarrette (from left) walk adoptable dogs.

Hines and Jarrette come to PACC several times a week to exercise and socialize dogs such as Ernie, a 1-year-old German Shepherd mix (below). Their apartment complex won’t let them adopt any more pets (they already have two cats), so the volunteering helps them get their pet fix.

“I have a very strong love for animals, and it’s nice to be part of the solution,” Jarrette says.

“It’s mutually beneficial, really,” Hines adds. “You get to do something for them but they also give a lot to you.”

Laurie and Kainan and Ernie

Hines and Jarrette with Ernie

We left excited to return to the shelter to see the new misting system installed in time to help the resident pets beat the summer heat. As Adoption Coordinator Ellie Beaubien tells us, “Our animals need it so desperately. I really can’t thank you enough!”

We’re also thrilled that PACC staffers will be attending our upcoming One Picture Saves a Life seminar in Las Vegas, where they’ll learn how to take lifesaving photos of their adoptable pets. PACC’s One Picture Saves a Life grant also includes a digital SLR camera and Photoshop photo-editing software.

Both grants are sure to help save the lives of pets such as Preston (below). We can’t wait to come back!

Preston the English Bulldog

Preston the English Bulldog is available for adoption from PACC.

See all of Pima Animal Care Center’s adoptable pets.

Help us help more pets in need.

 

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