Petfinder Foundation http://www.petfinderfoundation.com Helping Homeless Pets Since 2003 Sat, 29 Aug 2015 18:33:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Smokie http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/smokie/ http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/smokie/#comments Thu, 09 Jul 2015 20:47:20 +0000 Emily Fromm http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/?p=9698 smokie-12

Smokie was a special kitty to everyone that met him. He was my baby and always will be, we simply adored each other. He would give me kisses and hugs. He was always excited to see me, even if I just stepped out to put the trash out and came back in I was greeted like I was gone all day. Ma Ma loves you, Smokie. Be good, I will see you again for more hugs and kisses.–Rebecca Tuminelly

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More help for shelters affected by Texas, Oklahoma floods http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/more-help-for-shelters-affected-by-texas-oklahoma-floods/ http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/more-help-for-shelters-affected-by-texas-oklahoma-floods/#comments Wed, 03 Jun 2015 20:40:29 +0000 Emily Fromm http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/?p=9620 nieve_APA_crop

Flood rescue Nieve, with severe internal injuries, was saved by Austin Pets Alive!

We’re continuing to help shelters and rescue groups recover from recent devastating floods in Texas and Oklahoma. We recently granted $10,000 to Austin Pets Alive!, which not only suffered extensive damage when it was flooded on Memorial Day, but has also been called on to take in pets from surrounding towns and counties affected by the widespread flooding in central Texas, where shelters are overcrowded with lost and rescued pets.

“We need to foster out about 80 animals normally housed in our shelter,” Grants Manager Maggie Lynch says. “As of May 29, we have taken in 140 from other counties but are being called on to take many more as flooding continues.”

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Flooded kennels at Austin Pets Alive!

Our grant will help fund repairs to APA’s shelter: Its roof failed under the torrents of rain and its ground level was flooded. The rain-damaged parts of the building must be torn out quickly, as mold develops rapidly in Austin’s climate.

Our grant will also help pay staffers, who worked nearly 200 extra hours to coordinate the fostering out of all the shelter’s animals, and cover medical intake (including vaccines, tests and microchips) and spay/neuter for pets taken in from surrounding regions.

One pet rescued from the floods just in time is Nieve (pictured above). The little dog had suffered a tear to his diaphragm, allowing his organs to migrate into his chest cavity. APA’s vets operated, and he’s now recovering in foster care.

“We’re so grateful to be able to help pets like him because we are getting such great support from foundations like yours,” says Lynch.

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Flooding outside A Doggie 4 You in Texas

Replacing Kennels, Food
We also granted $1,000 to two organizations that suffered damage to their facilities and destruction of pet food. In Pipe Creek, Texas, our grant will help A Doggie 4 You replace more than 20 bags of dog food destroyed when storm rain and wind tore through its feed room.

“Thank you so much,” says president Patricia Godkin. “We really appreciate your support. We currently have 60 dogs and it has been crazy. We are finally getting a break from the rain. You guys are lifesavers.”

And in Tulsa, Okla., we’re aiding Amore Pit Bull Rescue. Founder Misty Bilby tells us: “We have two 10′  x 10′ x 6′ dog kennels that were destroyed when trees fell on them, and we had many bags of dog food ruined due to flood water.” The grant will be a big help. “We want to thank you so much for caring for our babies,” Bilby says, “and helping us make sure they are taken care of.”

Please donate now to help us continue to help shelters and rescue groups affected by flooding in Texas and Oklahoma!

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Pets in Texas and Oklahoma Need Your Help! http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/pets-in-texas-and-oklahoma-need-your-help/ http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/pets-in-texas-and-oklahoma-need-your-help/#comments Wed, 27 May 2015 17:11:50 +0000 Emily Fromm http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/?p=9572 With Texas and Oklahoma battling deadly floods, the Petfinder Foundation is rushing funds to animal shelters and rescue groups to help save the lives of pets in the affected regions.

Here are just a few of the ways we’re helping:

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The Humane Society of Wichita County in Texas was able to reunite this dog with his owner after floods forced local residents to evacuate.

Caring for Evacuees’ Pets
The staff of just five people at the Humane Society of Wichita County in Wichita Falls, Texas, has been working around the clock to care for the pets of families who’ve had to evacuate — and the shelter desperately needed funds to pay for staff overtime and extra utilities (the Petfinder Foundation is one of the few national organizations that gives cash grants to pay staff for overtime hours during times of disaster).

“We started taking in evacuees’ animals at 11 p.m. Wednesday night [May 20],” shelter Director Cheryl Miller tells us. “As the days went on and the city zoned more areas for flooding, we took in as many as we could house. We wanted to be here for our community if and when it needed us, so we kept the shelter open and are having to pay the staff overtime.”

H.S. Wichita County, which usually houses 70 animals, has already taken in an additional 51 dogs and cats. The shelter is strictly donor-funded, and our grant of $2,000 will help cover the costs of staff overtime and additional water and electric bills.

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Rocky is at Etosha Rescue and Adoption Center in Seguin, Texas.

Repairing Flooded Kennels
The storms and flooding in Central Texas caused major damage to Etosha Rescue & Adoption Center in Seguin, Texas. Assistant Director Julie Mitchell tells us, “Our kennels are flooded with six inches of water. Wind damage destroyed several outdoor kennels, the two main gates to the facility, windows in the main building, and a window a/c unit for the indoor dogs. We need loads of sand or gravel to raise the ground level in the outdoor kennels, tarps for shelter, mosquito spray, flea shampoo, paper towels, sheets and blankets for dry bedding, other dog supplies, a new a/c unit, and window replacements.”

With help from our $2,000 grant, the shelter “will safely rebuild the kennels for the outdoor dogs, raise the ground level so the dogs will be dry, secure the facility again with new front gates, treat all dogs for flea infestation, and provide cooling for the indoor dogs,” Mitchell says. “We hope to restore the facility to ensure safety and good living conditions for our dogs, safe from standing water, heat, and flea infestation.”

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Lucky is in the care of Horse Feathers Equine Center in Guthrie, Okla.

Feeding Hungry Horses
One surprising result of the floods has been a hardship in acquiring much-needed hay for horses. Cheri White Owl, president of Horse Feathers Equine Center in Guthrie, Okla., tells us, “Hay costs have risen due to our having to secure sources outside of our normal ones. Flooding has delayed hay cutting and production; some suppliers have lost hay due to flooding. We are having to go to higher-priced suppliers to meet our needs.”

Our grant of $1,500 will provide Horse Feathers’ rescued horses with 25 high-quality bales of hay. “This will allow us to continue feeding the horses and maintaining their body weight and health,” White Owl says, which is critical to both horses waiting to be adopted and those who are lifelong sanctuary residents.

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Charlotte lives in an outdoor kennel at Heart of Texas SPCA.

Protecting Outdoor Dogs
An outdoor-only facility, Heart of Texas SPCA in San Antonio suffered damage to its kennels from high winds and heavy rain, including broken kennel frames, ripped tarps and flooding.

Director Paula Oberle tells us, “Many of the dogs who lost their canopy coverage were standing in mud and water with nowhere to go. We did manage to bring a few inside until the water receded, but more rain is coming. We need new canopies as soon as possible.”

With our $1,000 grant, Heart of Texas “will purchase the heavy-duty canopies and set them up ASAP to protect the dogs,” Oberle says.

Keeping Momma Dogs and Puppies Safe
Missy’s Haven Canine Rescue in San Antonio received heavy winds, rain and lightning, and suffered damage to fencing used to keep the dogs contained, water damage to a food-storage building and the loss of an air-conditioning unit due to power surge. Our $2,000 grant will allow the group to “rebuild the containment area and provide a/c to our building for moms and babies,” says President Michelle Holmes.

Replacing Ruined Dog Food
The only building damaged by flooding at OK Save a Dog in Prague, Okla., was the one that stored all the food. Our $1,000 grant will help the organization purchase a month’s worth of food as well as a secure building in which to store it.

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Idella is at Tejas Rescued Pet Adoptions in San Antonio.

Boarding Pets After a Foster Home is Destroyed
A foster home housing pets for Tejas Rescued Pet Adoptions in San Antonio was severely flooded, meaning its human residents and 25 dogs and cats had to evacuate, with the pets going to a boarding facility until the damage is repaired.

“The pets’ location was flooded with four feet of water,” Director Tonette Webb says, “causing extensive damage to floors, walls and kennels. Mud is covering the floors now and all will need to be disinfected, cleaned and replaced before the pets can come back here. All adoptable pets are in a fee-based boarding facility until then. The estimate for boarding time is two weeks, depending on clean-up.”

Our $2,000 grant will help pay for the boarding as well as clean-up of the pets’ living space. “We will save our adoptable pets, safe now in boarding, and clean their kennels and replace beds and food,” Webb says.

Please donate now to help us continue to help shelters and rescue groups affected by flooding in Texas and Oklahoma!

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Three Dogs’ Pain Eased by Emergency Medical Grants http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/dogs-pain-eased-by-emergency-medical-grants/ http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/dogs-pain-eased-by-emergency-medical-grants/#comments Thu, 21 May 2015 21:27:28 +0000 Emily Fromm http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/?p=9534 jessica_before

Jessica suffered from a prolapsed uterus.

Our Emergency Medical Grants have helped ease the suffering of three more dogs in need. These are their stories.

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Hillary Shluker, director of Luv of Dogz Fund, Inc., in Scottsdale, Ariz., tells us, “We took in a boxer named Jessica who was found wandering and had a prolapsed uterus. She was emaciated and in pain. We took her in to our vet, who suspected sexual abuse. She had to have two surgeries to correct the issue.”

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Jessica (right) and her pal Ogden were adopted together.

During her recovery, Jessica bonded with another boxer in the rescue’s care, a male named Ogden. On May 18, they were adopted — together. Luv of Dogz wrote on Facebook: “Our precious pair of bonded boxers were adopted by a wonderful family today! Oggie and Jessica will get the love and attention that they deserve in their new home. Congratulations to the Williams family!”

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Hopeful was hit by a car and both her hind legs were broken.

Hopeful
Hopeful was hit by a car in West Virginia and required surgery to both her legs. Her first leg was treated in West Virginia and healed nicely, but the surgeon there could not repair the second leg and Hopeful limped. She was taken in by Sweet Dream House Rescue in Norwood, Ohio. Board President Carmen McKeehan says, “Our foster noticed that she would cry when going up stairs. Our vet, a locally well-known orthopedic surgeon, performed a delicate procedure which required taking out part of the bone and placing a pin in her second leg.”

Hopeful is currently in foster care and awaiting the removal of the pins in her leg. “She gets along great and has learned to use her three good legs,” McKeehan says. “She will be starting water therapy after the pins are removed. Hope is a survivor and an inspiration to us all at Sweet Dream House Rescue. The grant from the Petfinder Foundation made her second surgery possible and we are so grateful for your help!”

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Dixie before her surgery (left) and after, with her new brother, Ben.

Dixie Rutherford
A beagle named Dixie Rutherford was suffering from untreated glaucoma: One eye had swollen to twice its size and was extremely painful; the other had shrunken to the size of a raisin. Rescued by Beagle Rescue of Southern Maryland in Waldorf, she required surgery to remove both eyes so that her eyelids would not turn inwards, which would cause her even more pain.

BRSM volunteer Patti Jakusz tells us Dixie is now being forever fostered along with another dog, Ben Rutherford, because they’d bonded closely. Her foster mom says, “Dixie is a happy-go-lucky little sprite of a beagle! She is so happy now, all healed from surgery. She has our house and yard mapped out and is confident in her steps now. She greets me when I get home from work every day, wiggling her tiny rear! She loves her new brothers and sisters (two others are blind) and they accepted her right from the start. We love her (and Gentle Ben) soooo much!”

Thank you so much for your donations, which allow us to help shelters and rescue groups help pets like these!

Donate now to help more pets like these and Orvis will MATCH your gift!

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Two ‘Graces’ Helped by Emergency Medical Grants http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/two-graces-helped-by-emergency-medical-grants/ http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/two-graces-helped-by-emergency-medical-grants/#comments Wed, 20 May 2015 21:22:32 +0000 Emily Fromm http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/?p=9525 grace2_Grid7

Grace appeared to have been hit by a snowplow.

We recently introduced a new type of grant, which has been welcomed by the shelters and rescue groups we support: Emergency Medical Grants. These grants are designed to help pets suffering from severe illness or injury, for whom treatment can literally mean the difference between life and death. Here are some dogs they’ve already helped.

Grace
Grace was discovered nearly frozen to the ground in Wisconsin. She appeared to have been hit by a snow plow, her head impaled by a metal rod. She had sustained a skull fracture, abrasions, blood in her abdomen, and a bruised heart and lungs. Her right eye was so damaged, it had to be removed.

We awarded the Washington County Humane Society in Slinger, Wisc., a grant to help with her care. Grace has recovered and currently has an adoption pending. “All she can do is wiggle and kiss you,” WCHS Community Relations Coordinator Debra Block tells us. “This girl is the epitome of why we do what we do! Your grant has made all the difference.”

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Princess Grace suffered from a leg deformity.


Princess Grace
Little Grace suffers from canine carpal hyperextension, an abnormality causing dogs to walk on their elbows that can result from poor nutrition early in life. We gave One Love Animal Rescue in Mount Laurel, N.J., a grant to help cover splints and physical therapy for her. “With the grant, we expect that we can give Gracie everything she needs to get well, reduce pain and get adopted by a great forever family,” One Love Chairman Sherri Smith says. “We can do it all while not being temporarily sidelined by the expense.”

Thank you so much for your donations, which allow us to help shelters and rescue groups help pets like these!

Donate now to help more pets like these and Orvis will MATCH your gift!

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A Rabbit Is Treated for Horrifying Parasites http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/a-rabbit-is-treated-for-horrifying-parasites/ http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/a-rabbit-is-treated-for-horrifying-parasites/#comments Mon, 09 Feb 2015 21:16:53 +0000 Emily Fromm http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/?p=8961 nala

Nala with the holes made by three wolf worms (left), and today, with her “husbun,” Marshmallow

February is Adopt-A-Rescued-Rabbit Month, and we’re celebrating some of the many rabbits helped by shelters and rescue groups that have received grants from the Petfinder Foundation. Rabbits are the third most discarded pet in the United States, with many owners mistakenly thinking that pet rabbits can survive on their own outdoors (to be clear: THEY CAN’T).

This was the case with Nala, who nearly died before she was rescued by the Georgia House Rabbit Society. The organization’s resident center manager, Jennifer McGhee, tells us Nala’s story:

“Nala was found outside fending for herself after her family moved and left her behind. She eventually became weak enough to be caught by a neighbor. I met them to get her as they said she appeared to be injured. I smelled her before I laid eyes on her, as the infection was so severe. All I could tell was that her eye might have not been there anymore.

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Nala today, happy and healthy

“I took her to our vet early the next morning as it was a Sunday when I got her. They put her under anesthesia and shaved her on the side that appeared injured and infected. What they found were three massive wolf worms. The bot fly larvae attach to the host and hatch, then eat the flesh of the host to survive. They cause infection and abscesses in their wake and, if not properly removed, can release toxins that can cause death.

“One of the worms had burrowed in Nala’s temple and caused an abscess behind her eye. The vets were not sure that her eye could be saved. The other two worms had burrowed in her shoulder and side. The huge holes you see in the ‘before’ photo are where the wolf worms were living. I took Nala home as an emergency foster, as our shelter was full and she needed lots of care and medicine. She had four or five visits to Dr. King, who is a veterinary eye specialist. Nala was able to keep her eye and today only has a slight scar.

“Once she was healthy, the family that rescued her wanted to adopt her. I was very attached to her at this point, but I knew I had to honor the promise that I had made to them for them to have first choice once she was ready for adoption. I brought her to their home and left her with tears in my eyes. They called me the next day and said that she was not happy and their dog was not getting along with her. I drove right back over there and scooped her up. Later that evening, I emailed everyone to say that her adoption did not work out and that she was back at my home as a foster. Then someone said something that hit home and hit home hard: ‘Maybe Nala already found her forever home.’ That person was right.

“I went straight upstairs to my room to introduce her to my eligible bachelor. It was love at first sight! The ‘after’ picture is of Nala and her husbun Marshmallow.

“She is truly living her happily ever after.”

Learn more: 10 Reasons Rescued Rabbits Rule

Donate to help more rabbits like Nala.

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Working Together to Help Animals During Disaster http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/working-together-to-help-animals-during-disaster/ http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/working-together-to-help-animals-during-disaster/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 22:30:34 +0000 Emily Fromm http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/?p=8926 OK_humane1

This dog was rescued by Central Oklahoma Humane Society with a fractured leg after a tornado struck that region in 2013.

This post, by Claire Sterling, originally appeared on the ASPCA Professional website. Read it here.

In the world of grantmaking, it’s common knowledge that applying for funding is hard work — and if you’re doing that work multiple times to reach a number of funders, all while scrambling to help animals who have been affected by a tornado, wildfire or severe flood, it can be downright overwhelming.

With this in mind, a group of funders have worked together to ease the burden of the grant application process for animal welfare organizations that either have been directly affected by a disaster or have been appointed by their local authorities to provide assistance to other organizations. The ASPCA, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the Petfinder Foundation and (for major disasters affecting Colorado) the Animal Assistance Foundation have just teamed up to form a single application and collaborative review process to streamline funding during a disaster.

These funders will collectively consider requests for funding that are submitted via a centralized portal at animaldisasterfunding.org for specific major disasters. Particular disasters for which the application portal is available will be determined on a case-by-case basis at the discretion of the individual organizations participating in this funding collaboration. Eligible disasters must be significant enough to warrant a state-of-emergency declaration.

Information regarding specific disasters for which funding will be available will be posted via a Request for Proposals (RFP) on the “Funding Opportunities” page on animaldisasterfunding.org. (Please note that while applications submitted through the centralized portal will be reviewed by a group of funders, each funder who provides support will make its own grant to the applying organization and will issue its own grant contract and reporting requirements.)

Since participating funders can opt in and out of the collaborative, the makeup of the review committee will shift depending on the circumstances and on the affected geographic region(s). Over time, we expect to grow the group of funders to include other animal welfare grantmakers and, ideally, also community and family foundations serving disaster-affected regions.

We will all be learning as we go; this is a relatively unprecedented development not only in animal welfare, but also in the broader field of philanthropy. The concept of collaborative funding is nothing new, but rarely is it directly tied to a joint review of grant requests submitted via a single application form representing the interests of multiple funders. In this case, shared concern for applicants’ limited time — particularly when responding to a disaster — is the primary driver of our collaborative effort.

In the spirit of preparing for the worst but hoping for the best, our greatest desire for this funding collaborative is that disasters calling for its use are few and far between. And in the spirit of an ounce of prevention being worth a pound of cure, we strongly encourage organizations to do everything possible to make themselves and their facilities as disaster-proof as possible. As a starting point, please be sure to check out the ASPCA’s Disaster Response Resources page for further information.

With that, we wish you a healthy, happy, disaster-free 2015.

Guest blogger Claire Sterling is Director, Grant Strategies at the ASPCA. Having previously done foundation fundraising for six years at the Foundation Center, her personal blog, The Lion’s Share, provides philanthropy-related resources for organizations that better the lives of animals.

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New Emergency Medical Grants Help Two Puppies http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/new-emergency-medical-grants-help-two-puppies/ http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/new-emergency-medical-grants-help-two-puppies/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 21:40:24 +0000 Emily Fromm http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/?p=8907 Harley

Harley has pneumonia. Our grant to the Pepper Foundation will help cover his medical bills.

The Petfinder Foundation has recently begun accepting applications for new Emergency Medical grants, designed to help shelters and rescue groups care for pets who need urgent veterinary care in order to become adoptable. These grants can cover the costs of emergency surgery, dental work and other treatments, up to $1,000. (If you are with a Petfinder.com member adoption group and have a pet who qualifies, apply for an Emergency Medical grant here.)

Two puppies are the first recipients of Emergency Medical grants. One is Fergus (pictured below), a young American Staffordshire Terrier in the care of ABRA, Inc. (All Breed Rescue Angels) in Crown Point, Ind. Our $1,000 grant to ABRA will cover the cost of surgery to treat Fergus’s broken leg.

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With our grant, ABRA, Inc. can pay for surgery for Fergus.

As just a 3-month-old puppy, Fergus found himself at a local animal control shelter with a fractured femur. He spent five days in a cage with this untreated injury before ABRA pulled him, and rushed him to a vet to have pins inserted into the broken hind leg. Fergus has healed beautifully and ABRA reports he’s “truly a sweetheart [who] loves other dogs and everyone he meets.”

As for the Emergency Medical grant, it’s a big help to ABRA. “This is fantastic news that couldn’t have come at a better time,” the group’s Christy McKee tells us. “I can’t tell you how grateful we are!” Want to adopt Fergus? Meet him here.

We also awarded a $1,000 grant to the Pepper Foundation in Studio City, Calif., to help with the care of Harley, a young spaniel-Chihuahua mix pulled from a busy shelter who came down with kennel cough that turned into pneumonia.

Harley is currently in the hospital, but his rescuers are confident he’ll be better soon and ready for his forever home. The grant is a big help. “Thank you so much!” Pepper Foundation president Julie Chadwick says. “This took so much of our resources that I was just so worried about things and how we were going to pay for Harley. He is so young and otherwise a healthy dog and so adoptable. Thank you from the bottom of my heart for helping him.” Want to adopt Harley? Meet him here.

Donate now to help more pets like these and Orvis will MATCH your gift!

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Josie http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/josie/ http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/josie/#comments Thu, 22 Jan 2015 16:36:58 +0000 Emily Fromm http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/?p=8873 Josie

We adopted Josie from the shelter on December 23, 2009. She looked just like our Beagle, Shelby, who had died a month prior. When they brought her out of her kennel at the shelter so we could meet her, we said, “Hi Josie” and she rolled over to get a belly rub. We knew then that she was our dog. She was already 9 when we adopted her, but we had her for five wonderful years. What she loved most was being nestled in with us on the couch while watching TV, and of course, so did we. I will miss hearing her excited Beagle bay when I get home from work at the end of the day. Josie girl, we love you and will miss you dearly.–Donna Callegari

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Obi http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/obi/ http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/blog/obi/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 19:20:20 +0000 Emily Fromm http://www.petfinderfoundation.com/?p=8755 obi

This is our greatly missed Obi, whom we lost suddenly to congestive heart failure. He was 8 years old and had a heck of a life, being returned two times to Legacy Boxer Rescue as well as being a dwarf with multiple medical problems.–Pam and Greg Harper

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