Posts By: Emily Fromm

Saving Roxy the Stray and Her Puppies

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Thanks to your donations and a matching grant from Orvis, a stray mama dog named Roxy and her puppies were saved by staff at Ponca City Humane Society in Oklahoma. We got this grant report from Executive Director Patricia Amador:

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Roxy is ready to play.

“We were contacted back in the beginning of March of this year by an individual who had found a stray who had had puppies behind our local skate park. We at that time did not have room to take the stray and her puppies in, but we were able to secure the person who found them to keep them on a temporary basis as a foster.

“She was able to house them but began to inform us that her neighbor was trying to take the mother dog, now named Roxy. Roxy sadly was stolen from foster’s yard on March 17. Her puppies, who were still nursing, where found scattered in the driveway of the home. Luckily, the foster was able to locate all eight puppies. We scrambled for fosters and were able to find two that were willing to take the puppies in. They were fostered for roughly two weeks and returned to our facility. Roxy was eventually found at our local animal control and we were able to reclaim her from there.

“The puppies, unfortunately, had been exposed to parvovirus, although only five came down with the disease. All were admitted into our local vet and aggressive treatment was started. Sadly, we lost three of the female puppies. We were saddened that even with aggressive treatment we were unable to save them all.

Roxy Babies

Roxy’s puppies

“The remaining puppies recovered well and the first puppy from that litter, Disco, was adopted on March 8. The second, Buster, was adopted on March 10. Disco went home with a lovely young lady, while Buster, now named Ace, was adopted by a father, son and daughter team. We wish them all the best in their new homes. Roxy and the remaining three puppies are waiting to find their forever homes. We welcome anyone interested in them to contact us.

“We would like to give the Petfinder Foundation a huge thank you for the generous Orvis grant. We are a 501(c)(3) non-profit no-kill small humane society that does not receive any government funding and relies on the good will and generosity of individuals, corporations, and adopters and donors to keep us going.”

Learn more about adopting Roxy here!

Meet Roxy’s puppies who are still waiting for forever homes:

Hank

Pepper

Linus
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Abused, Burned and Abandoned

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The Petfinder Foundation gave a grant to Saving Animals for Everyone in Anthony, FL, which used the funds to buy food and bedding; to construct a yard area in which the dogs can play, socialize and meet potential adopters; and to pay for repairs, vet visits and general operating supplies. They also shared with us the story of Chance:

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Chance

“Chance was found one morning tied to the front gate. He was abused, with obvious burn marks, and very thin. He was so very happy to be found. He was immediately taken to the vet for an exam. He was found to have heartworms and other parasites. He was given medicine and then had to be kept in quarantine for 6 months or until released by the vet.

“He was between 2-4 years old, a Staffordshire terrier mix. He was so affectionate and smiled whenever anyone came to feed or spend some time with him. In a few months, his worms were cleared up, he had gained weight, had been neutered and was ready to be adopted.

“Before we could list him on Petfinder, a friend of the sanctuary saw him and immediately wanted to adopt him. He didn’t get along with other dogs well, but in this home he would be an only dog, so away he went to his forever home. The Petfinder Foundation grant helped Chance to get a new home. It is what this grant is all about, so thank you for granting it to us.”

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A Miracle for an Escape Artist with Separation Anxiety

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King

We got this grant report from Humane Society of Warren County in Front Royal, VA. Executive director Lavenda Denney tells us:

“A loving pit bull named King had once been adopted but then returned to the shelter because he was suffering from separation anxiety. During times of separation, he was chewing excessively and causing destruction in the home.

“He was also an escape artist. His first adoptive family lived in town limits and the neighbors were scared of King due to his breed. All of these behavioral issues combined forced the family to return King, although he had been wonderful with the family, very kind and loving, as long as he had adequate attention.

“Once returned, we placed King in a Thundershirt. He did very well in kennel, participated in shelter dog-play groups and off-site adoption events. King was even featured at a Chamber of Commerce after-hours event. He was given a second chance when a wonderful family came to adopt him.

King in his Thundershirt. “He was so excited to be adopted that he wouldn’t sit still,” Denney says.

“The family was made aware of his separation anxiety and escape issues. King was sent home with his Thundershirt in an effort to continue to reduce his stress level as he transitioned (once again) from the shelter to a new home environment. King’s new family was trained on the use of the Thundershirt and encouraged to purchase a shirt.”

 

 

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One Picture Saves a Life

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Bones, before (inset) and after

These days, most people who adopt find their pets on Petfinder before they meet them at a shelter. That means the pet’s photo plays a big part in making a first impression.

And wouldn’t it be great if all shelter pets could have their portraits taken by a bestselling, world-famous pet photographer? Like, say, Underwater Dogs author Seth Casteel?

Seth can’t photograph every homeless pet, but in our new program with The Animal Rescue Site and GreaterGood.org, One Picture Saves a Life, he’s traveling the country training shelter staff and volunteers to take pictures the way he does — pictures that show the pet’s true personality. And our friends at John Paul: Pet are helping to give those pets grooming makeovers so they can truly put their best faces forward.

One Picture Saves a Life kicks off at St. Hubert’s Animal Welfare Center in Madison, NJ, and will be followed by stops in Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Chicago, Charlotte, NC, and Puerto Rico.

To learn more, visit www.OnePictureSaves.com.

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A Shot at Life … Join the 2 Million Pet Challenge!

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Mary-Kate, an adoptable cat at The Long Island Feline Adoption Center, is healthier thanks to a vaccination grant from BIVI and the Petfinder Foundation.

We’re thrilled to announce that we’ve partnered with Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. (BIVI) and The Animal Rescue Site to help vaccinate 2 million shelter pets.

The initiative, called A Shot at Life … Join the 2 Million Pet Challenge!, is a three-part collaboration to help protect shelter pets against disease so that they are more likely to be adopted.

Nearly 8 million pets enter shelters each year, with about half of them making it out. A Shot at Life … Join the 2 Million Pet Challenge! will vaccinate 25 percent of the shelter population and hopefully help more animals be adopted.

Visitors to The Animal Rescue Site, a partner of GreaterGood.org, can click daily on the “Click Here — it’s FREE” button on the site. For every click, the funding from advertising sponsors helps pay for food and care for shelter animals.

The Petfinder Foundation works with shelters, rescue organizations and animal welfare organizations across the country to help ensure that no adoptable pet is euthanized for lack of a good home. Based on the number of clicks the campaign gets through The Animal Rescue Site, the Petfinder Foundation will work with local shelters to provide vaccination awards.

BIVI will provide the vaccines that will be granted to shelters to vaccinate both dogs and cats. “We are extremely excited about this partnership,” says Colin Meyers, BIVI’s executive director, pet division. “We believe prevention is the best medicine and that every dog and cat deserves to be protected against disease.”

BIVI has already donated 13,500 doses of vaccine to help pets displaced by Superstorm Sandy. Working with the Petfinder Foundation, more than 13,000 pets were vaccinated due to this effort, and BIVI hopes A Shot at Life … Join the 2 Million Pet Challenge! will continue to help more animals be vaccinated.

“Imagine 2 million animals being vaccinated just because people went to The Animal Rescue Site and clicked on our sponsorship ad,” says Meyers. “It is truly amazing what we can do if we work together, and I look forward to the day we vaccinate that two-millionth pet.”

“The Animal Rescue site is proud to have Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc., as a partner,” says Liz Baker, executive director of GreaterGood.org. “We believe together we can give shelter pets a better chance of finding homes by keeping them healthy with vaccinations.”

“Our mission is to ensure no adoptable pet is euthanized for lack of a home,” says Petfinder Foundation executive director Lisa Robinson. “Providing good health is one of the biggest steps in helping animals find good homes. BIVI is providing that through preventive health.”

To help donate to the challenge and for information on how the challenge is progressing, visit www.TheAnimalRescueSite.com/AShotAtLife.

If you are with a Petfinder shelter or rescue group and would like to apply for a vaccination grant, click here.

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Kitten Thrown from a Car Finds Love

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Slick

We received this grant report from Cyndi Dill at HELP Humane Society in Belton, MO, which received a Shelter+ Challenge grant from the Petfinder Foundation and The Animal Rescue Site.

Slick and his new best friend.

“Slick was brought into our vet clinic right at closing time on a Saturday afternoon. A Good Samaritan had seen the kitten get tossed from a car right in front of her. She stopped to help the kitten but could not afford to have his injuries treated. Her vet contacted us about taking over his care and we were happy to be able to help him.

“Our vets were not sure he would survive — he had many injuries and a hairline fracture on one of this back legs. He did survive and is now in a family where they can’t imagine life without him. Their little girl dresses him up. He is now a year old. Slick loves his little girl.

“In addition, we were able to purchase 30 feline leukemia/FIV combo tests at $813.60. Each and every cat that comes into our shelter must be tested, and the test is not cheap. We were so happy to be able to purchase these with a portion of your grant!”

Thank you to everyone who voted in the Animal Rescue Site’s Shelter+ Challenge. Your donations enable us to help shelters and rescue groups help more pets like Slick.

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How Did Five ‘Hard-to-Place’ Dogs Find Homes?

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Dart was adopted thanks to a grant from the Petfinder Foundation and Orvis.

We received this grant report from Peg Zappen at Coulee Region Humane Society in Onalaska, WI. The shelter received a grant from the Petfinder Foundation and Orvis, which for the second year in a row is matching your donations to the Petfinder Foundation dollar-for-dollar up to $30,000. (Donate now and double your impact!)

Choodle

“Several dogs with special needs got boosts toward adoptability. We used grant funds for extra veterinary care that removed obstacles to adoption for these dogs.

Dart is a 6-year-old male pug cross who is very social, loves to give kisses and had very bad breath. His teeth were so bad that adopters were reluctant to look at him very seriously. Thanks to you, lucky Dart got his very bad teeth cleaned, a tooth extracted and was neutered. He now has a sweet smile and has been adopted.

“Choodle is a male poodle/Chihuahua cross who loves to be dressed in sweaters and cuddled but sadly suffered from bad teeth and very bad breath. Choodle also benefited from having his teeth cleaned and needed dental extraction completed and was neutered. He became much more appealing and is now in his forever home.

Wyatt

“Wyatt is a male redbone coonhound — a common dog in this part of the country — surrendered because he was missing a foot. Wyatt was neutered, which is just what it took to make it easier to place him. He is now living in a coonhound-loving home.

“Sweet Maggie is an 8-year-old beagle with too many strikes against her, including epilepsy. Thanks to you, she had seven teeth extracted, improving her prospects for long-term good health. An adopter with experience with an epileptic dog saw her, saw the work that had been done for her and wanted to keep her run of good luck going by taking her home forever.

“Pee Wee is a charming, snuggly Chihuahua mix who was surrendered to us by a man who was devastated because he had accidentally hurt this dog. This gentleman was dog-sitting Pee Wee for a friend and accidentally stepped on Pee Wee’s leg and broke it. The man had dogs of his own and was not accustomed to having a small dog underfoot. He offered to pay for half of the veterinary care for Pee Wee, but the owner said Pee Wee was not worth spending money on and wouldn’t take him back. Our gentleman already had all the dogs he could manage, could not truly afford any vet care, and brought Pee Wee to us.

Maggie

“We turned to the Petfinder Foundation’s Orvis grant funds for help. A local vet x-rayed Pee Wee’s leg, found a fracture that required surgery and performed the surgery for less than $250. A vet tech is providing foster care until Pee Wee can be safely adopted out.

“These five dogs would not be in such good shape, with such good fortune and hope, without you. Thank you so very much.”

Donate today and Orvis will match your gift to help more dogs like these find forever homes!

 

 

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Cats in Long Island are Healthier Thanks to Our Grant

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Mary-Kate with her vaccines.

We received this email from Lisa Napoli, shelter manager at The Long Island Feline Adoption Center in Smithtown, NY. LIFAC received a grant from the Petfinder and Boehringer Ingelheim to replace vaccines that had been destroyed during Hurricane Sandy.

“On behalf of the Long Island Feline Adoption Center, I would like to take this opportunity to thank BI and the Petfinder Foundation for awarding us this vaccination grant.

“During the storm our facility lost power, destroying the vaccines we had for our animals. These vaccines can be costly and replacing them ourselves would have been a hardship that we would have otherwise been forced to endure on our own.

“As a rescue, we know that every penny counts, so we are extremely thankful for the assistance we received.

Baby with her vaccines.

“Here are a few pictures of our cats waiting to receive their vaccines. The brown tabby is Baby, who has been at the adoption center for a few years now. She stays in the office and greets everyone who comes into our adoption center.

“The second picture is of a tabby-and-white cat named Mary-Kate. She can be shy at times but is very sweet. She is a beautiful kitty and is waiting for her perfect home.

“Thanks again for helping us in our time of need. These vaccines will be of great benefit to all of our cats and kittens here at the shelter. Now we can focus all of our efforts on getting them each good homes.”

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A Shelter Renovation is the Key to Getting Pets Adopted

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The Petfinder Foundation‘s program assistant and resident photographer-videographer, Brody Anderson, spent last week in Tavares, FL, documenting Rescue U  ‘s renovation of Lake County Animal Services. He sent back this report:

This cat at Lake County Animal Services in Tavares, FL, will enjoy a new outdoor enclosure.

“I was fortunate enough to be a part of Rescue U’s January project at Carolina Waterfowl Rescue in Indian Trail, NC, so I thought I had a good idea of what I would witness at the Tavares build. The shelter would undergo a series of improvements with the intention of enriching the lives of the pets living there. Happy, healthy pets have a much better chance of finding forever homes.

“During the course of my visit, I had the opportunity to speak with the shelter’s animal services director, Marjorie Boyd. As our conversation progressed, I began to truly understand the impact the project would have for the shelter’s pets.

Zeus (left) and his sister Princess were both adopted during the Rescue U renovation.

“Marjorie was very excited about the new meet-and-greet yard. Families will now have a chance to spend quality time with the dogs, in the sun and away from the noisy kennel environment. With their stress levels lowered, each dog will have the chance to impress adopters. The majority of the shelter dogs were well-behaved, and many knew tricks. Playing a quick game of fetch or demonstrating sit-and-stay skills could be a shelter dog’s ticket to scoring a forever home.

“Being a big fan of cats, I was dismayed to hear how many at the shelter are euthanized each year. At first glance, many cats can seem shy and distant. This can be a turnoff for families looking for a household pet. Marjorie hopes the new outdoor cat enclosures and the new playroom will go a long way toward changing this perception. She works diligently to promote cat adoption and she’s convinced these new areas will have a positive effect.

“After my discussion with Marjorie, I wandered through the kennel corridors with my camera. I came across Zeus and Princess, brother and sister Pit Bull mixes. It was sad seeming them behind the chain-link kennel gates, but thanks to your generous donations, they got the chance to run and play in the meet-and-greet yard. And sure enough, both were adopted while I was in Florida.”

Your donation to the Petfinder Foundation will help us renovate more shelters and give even more homeless pets a better quality of life and greater chance at finding forever homes.

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When You Give to Us, Where Does Your Money Go?

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Second Chance Rescue used our grant to buy 14 extra-large dog crates so it could save dogs like Sprokett, who’d been scheduled for euthanasia at a shelter. “He’s now very happy in a wonderful foster home!” says Second Chance’s Debi Root. “Thank goodness we had the room (and the crate) to take him in before his time was up — he’s one terrific boy!”

Emily Fromm, Chief Development Officer

Once in a while someone will write to me and ask, “If I donate to you, how much of my money will go to actually helping pets?”

This is a question I’m always happy to answer, because it gives me a chance to show off the fact that the Petfinder Foundation does great work at very little administrative expense. It’s a question everyone should ask before giving to charity, and I’m going to tell you how to find the answer in our Form 990, the return we file each year with the IRS. You can follow the same steps with any organization’s 990 (many make theirs available on their websites, or you can use independent watchdog group Charity Navigator’s 990 finder).

You can find our 990s from 2010 through 2014 on our Financials page, or open our 990 for 2014 by clicking here.

On our 990 for 2014, go to p. 10, the Statement of Functional Expenses. Here’s where you can see how we spent our money in 2014. Our total expenses, at the bottom of column A, were $1,315,071. Of that total, $1,193,501, or 91%, went to program service expenses — that is, the programs that help homeless pets.

You’ll also see that we spent $51,037 (3.8%) on management and general expenses and $70,533 (5.4%) on fundraising. So …. is that good? Well, according to Charity Navigator, “the most efficient charities spend 75% or more of their budget on their programs and services and less than 25% on fundraising and administrative fees.” So with 91% of our budget going to programs and services, we are really efficient by the highest independent standards.

Trinity had been in constant pain from a botched declaw. With our grant, CATS Cradle got her surgery to relieve her suffering.

But you don’t have to take our word for it. We’ve been reviewed by the three major independent watchdog organizations: the Better Business Bureau (we have an A+ rating), Charity Navigator (we have four out of four stars) and GuideStar (we have five out of five stars).

One thing we don’t spend our money on: for-profit telemarketing firms. You may have read some of the recent exposés about these companies and the huge percentage of donors’ money that they keep for themselves.

If you ever receive a call from the Petfinder Foundation, I can promise you it will be from me or another member of our three-person staff. We never have, and never will, hire a telemarketing firm, nor do we purchase mailing lists.

Back to our programs and services. We give grants to the adoption groups that post their pets on Petfinder.com — i.e., the overwhelming majority of shelters and rescue groups in North America. Our grants are designed to help groups find homes for their adoptable pets, prepare for and recover from natural disasters, and become more sustainable.

An organization must apply for a grant in order to receive funds. Some of our grant programs include emergency medical, disaster recovery, vaccination, transport (moving pets from crowded shelters to regions where they are more likely to find homes) and Rescue U (volunteers renovate dilapidated or disaster-damaged shelters). We also give grants for care and feeding, spay/neuter and general operations.

But all our grants are designed with one ultimate goal in mind: preventing the euthanasia of adoptable pets. That means we do whatever it takes to help shelters and rescue groups keep the pets in their care physically and mentally healthy, and available to adopters who will give them loving forever homes.

Charitable giving is a great way to have an impact and receive a tax deduction. I hope this post has answered any questions you may have had about giving to us. If it hasn’t, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me at emily@petfinderfoundation.com. You can also learn more about us by exploring our website, following us on Facebook or signing up for our monthly newsletter. Thank you for everything you do to help homeless pets!

Other resources:

Real Simple: What to Consider When Making Charitable Donations

Charity Navigator: Top 10 Best Practices of Savvy Donors

Charity Navigator: Evaluating Charities Not Currently Rated by Charity Navigator

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