Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

A Way For A Stray Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Vetting and health care for our rescue dogs

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Helped pay our vet bills and helped us take in a few more medically needy dogs from animal control!

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Words from Walter: Hi, folks! You haven't heard much from me, but it's about time I spoke up and told you my story, since not much was known when I was taken in. Two weeks ago, people thought I was a Chinese crested mix, because I had such little hair on my back and weird black freckles. Actually, I found out I'm a shih tzu (I hear that's a good thing to be). I lived in a house with people who fed me crappy food -- it tasted bad and it made my hair fall out and my skin itch. Then my tummy hurt and I peed all the time in the house. They got really mad at me, but I couldn't help myself! Instead of taking me to a doggy doctor, who could have helped me feel better and not pee all the time, someone put a knife to my throat and cut it. Then they dumped me and left me all alone on the street to die.

Don't feel sad, though, because these nice rescue ladies saved me! Now I'm with my foster mom, Bonni, and I get wonderful healthy food, good oils for my skin, and pills to make me feel better. I've only been on them a few days, but already I don't pee so much and my tummy doesn't hurt all the time. I heard the doggy doctor say that I had a "leathery bladder," whatever that is, because I was in pain with this infection for a long time. Hey, not being able to talk about what ails you really holds a guy back! I'm just 14 lbs. and will be looking for a new home with kind people to love me and take good care of me. I'm only a few years old, I love people and dogs and cats; oh, I don't swim very well, but that's a story for another day!

Heaven Can Wait Animal Rescue: Bissell Rescue U
What was the money or product used for?

Large kennel with canopy, grooming table and bathing setup for dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped a great deal with preparing dogs for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

It will continue to help but has already helped at least 60.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We got in several mange puppies who needed to be repeatedly bathed and dipped. Our new large kennel with canopy, grooming table and bathing setup, funded by the Bissell Rescue U grant, helped a great deal with preparing the dogs for adoption.

National Mill Dog Rescue: Dogly Do Good Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Funds were used to defray veterinary medical expenses for Wren, a 10-year-old puppy-mill survivor we rescued in February. Her expenses far exceeded the amount of the grant, but we are so very grateful to have received the $500 toward her care. See below for details.

Because of the poor health that puppy-mill dogs have to endure, and because of our commitment to give them all of the treatment they need to be restored to health, our expenses for outside veterinary care run about $9,000 every month. This is in addition to the average $240 per dog for standard care in our in-house clinic.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below story about Wren. She is just one of nearly 10,000 dogs we have rescued in our eight-year history. It is our goal to save as many as we can and to educate the public about the sad realities of the commercial dog-breeding industry.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wren, a 10-year-old former breeding dog in a Midwest puppy mill, was in sad shape when we rescued her earlier this year. She had a luxating jaw and an old fracture on the right side of her little face where some of the bone was missing. As a result, her pink tongue slides out of the side of her mouth -- now very cute, but not so cute before! She had mammary masses, which are common in puppy-mill dogs who have been repeatedly bred for years on end and never received veterinary care, She had untreated infections, which left her ears swollen and painful.

Wren had jaw surgery, spay surgery, mammary-tumor surgery, plus the standard vaccinations, deworming, microchipping, and a ton of TLC from dozens of volunteers, who have comforted her and loved her every single day since she arrived at our Peyton kennel on Feb. 4, 2015.

Wren was part of our Hundred Hearts rescue -- the largest in our eight-year history -- which brought 100 dogs from mills in Kansas, Missouri and Arkansas home to freedom.

Wren has recovered well from all of the trauma in her past life. She is ready and willing to meet her lifelong family and become a treasured family pet. Meet Wren: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31497232/

A Way for a Stray : Dogly Do Good Grant
What was the money or product used for?

All of our funds go directly towards the needs of our rescue dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Necessities such as food, medication, vaccines, spay/neuter and microchipping occur daily and are what consists of the basic care for our animals. We take on severe medical cases that sometimes require the attention of neurologists, orthopedic surgeons and other specialists to assist with the rehabilitation of our injured animal. These visits and treatment plans can be costly. We also take in many dogs that have heartworm and need to undergo treatment.

As well as medical needs, we also provide any and all supplies to our foster homes during our rescue dogs' stay. Items such as a bed, leash, collar, food and preventatives are supplied to our foster parents so they are not burdened with the cost of an additional pet and can focus on giving them all the love and care that they have been missing for so long. Most of our foster parents refuse the donation and provide it themselves. They ask for those supplies to be left for the next foster home. This is why we take such great care of the foster homes we have and the dogs they care for.

Our efforts only go as far as our funds and foster homes, so this is the most important part of our organization. We were so happy to be a part of the Dogly competition and cannot thank this site enough for the generous donation provided.

How many pets did this grant help?

10+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Being in the rescue world, there are certain images that haunt your mind. And with each and every defeated soul that crosses our path, we always think, "Well, it can't get any worse than this." But somehow, the city of Miami, FL, never ceases to amaze us. Today, we received a haunting photo of a puppy lying lifeless on the streets of Miami. She was en route to the pound, and we knew immediately that we had to do something. How could today be National Puppy Day and here lay this lifeless creature, just a puppy herself, knocking on death's door.

Immediately began the text messages, emails and phone calls to coordinate the rescue of this sweet soul. We knew right away that what she needed was a miracle. And thus, Miracle came to A Way for a Stray. Miracle will be staying at South Kendall Animal Hospital until she is healthy enough to be released into foster care. We do not know who did this to her, or how she got to this point, but we are certainly trying to piece the puzzle together.

What we do know so far is that she has been given a body score of 1 out of 9, meaning she is as emaciated as can be. She is around 14 weeks old. She is 3.7 pounds and has a good appetite. She has come back negative for a deadly disease called parvo. She is receiving subcutaneous fluids since she is extremely dehydrated, and has some minor blood coming out of her rectum. She is also missing her tail and we don't know how or why -- we just hope it is not because of a human being's doing. We hope that with time, medical care, and, most importantly, love, this will all be a distant memory for baby Miracle.

Rochester Animal Services: Dogly Do Good Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used these funds to help pay for our cat and dog enrichment programs, which include Kongs, Nylabones, cat toys, etc.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We get some of these enrichment items from public donations but not nearly enough to sustain the nearly 6,000 animals that pass through each year. A few times each week, volunteers come through the shelter to give these special treats to the animals to help them stay happy, healthy and mentally stimulated while they await their forever homes. It is important to helping the animals pass time in a playful way each week.

How many pets did this grant help?

Best estimate is 50-60, but some of them will continue to be used with new animals that stay at the shelter.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bella was with us for more than 45 days awaiting a forever family to find her. We knew this 3-year-old beauty would make a great companion for anyone. She loves agility and running through tunnels and can catch treats in the air. She is a sweet girl who loves to snuggle in the volunteers' laps. Bella kept a clean kennel and loves riding in the car. Without these important supplies, Bella would not have stayed mentally engaged during her stay to stay stable and find her new family. Thank you so much for helping us continue to help Rochester's homeless pets.

Casa del Toro Pit Bull Rescue: Dogly Do Good Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used our Dogly grant monies to pay towards Lenny's heartworm treatment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We rescued Lenny from the Indianapolis shelter and he was heartworm-positive. This grant helped us start Lenny's heartworm treatment immediately instead of waiting to begin treatment until we had the funds available.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lenny came into the Indianapolis shelter as a stray. He was severely injured, possibly from a dog fight, and was heartworm-positive. Our rescue pulled Lenny because he was considered unadoptable at the shelter. Lenny is about two months into his eight-month heartworm treatment and still has a long way to go to be fully healthy and adoptable. The receipt of our Dogly grant monies ensured that we could save Lenny, start his heartworm treatment and have time to fundraise in order to raise the additional $500 his treatment cost.

k9.5 Rescue: Dogly Do Good Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Medical care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to take in and help a dog who was hit by a car.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We applied the $500 Dogly Do-Good grant to the care of Botti (pronounced “Bodie” -- formerly Buster Brown), a sweet Pit Bull/Retriever mix who has had multiple rounds of bad luck. We were contacted about Botti by a good Samaritan who found him on the side of the road just moments after Botti was hit by a car. She and her family took him to a vet where radiographs showed that he had a broken pelvis and several wounds on his skin. He was also FULL OF PELLETS.

They contacted us for help, and we began working on finding him a foster. At the time there was nobody coming forth to foster, and it was frightening because we really wanted to help him. I’d personally met him and he was so incredibly sweet. He shook when he saw me walk up because he was terrified I’d hurt him -- shook earthquake-style. Once I pet him and talked to him for a minute, he wagged, gave kisses and couldn’t get enough of me. I instantly knew we had to help him. His heart was pure as gold and someone had taken advantage of that and been very cruel to him.

I talked with the lady who found him for a bit, and she agreed to foster...hooray!

We immediately got all of his vaccines, his fecal and deworming, and heartworm-tested him...to find out he was positive. *Crying*

So at this point he’s been abused, shot and full of several pellets (including one in his penis and one near his heart), had several wounds, was hit by a car, and is heartworm-positive.

A few weeks later I got a call from the lady who found him and was fostering him. She asked me if he had Pit Bull in him. I responded “yes” and she said it was a problem because her family did not want Pit Bull around because they would kill the grandkids. The lady’s daughter refused to bring her children to her mother’s house. In addition, the lady’s husband wanted him gone.

The poor dog couldn’t get a break.

The lady who found him broke down in tears when I picked him up because she loved him dearly. A totally different attitude than the rest of her family, her heart was broken. However, strife had developed in her family because of Botti, and it was not wise for him to remain there.

Botti was neutered and had to board after surgery while he recovered (a safety issue because of his hips and heartworm status) and until we could find a foster home. Finally, a gentleman decided he needed to help this boy and offered to foster. He and Botti met and have bonded heavily.

Once he is fully recovered with his hips and neuter, he will finish heartworm treatment (is currently on the recommended protocol prior to treatment). We’ve put the entire grant toward Botti’s care.

This darling boy deserved nothing less than love and now he’s finally getting it. He is so gentle, so intelligent and has so much love to give...we’re just so proud of him. His foster daddy says he’s an incredible dog.

So thank you...thank you for allowing us to help Botti improve his health and get on the right track. We look forward to him being fully recovered and heartworm-free!

Take a look at our handsome man! The first two are when I met him and took him to the doctor. The others are more recent in his foster home. :)

Thank you again!

Utah Animal Adoption Center: Bissell Rescue U
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to partially pay for our storage cabinets in our surgical suite.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This donation allows UAAC to to properly store and secure medication necessary for our surgical and dental procedures, as well as to medicate any ill animals that we house on our property.

How many pets did this grant help?

965 animals in 2014, all of whom received some type of medical care in our medical suite.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

I've attached a photo of one of our puppies, Molly. Molly, and other puppies like her, are able to receive their spays/neuters at our facility. Because we are able to care for puppies like Molly at our shelter, we are able to decrease the amount of time between intake, wellness exam, spay/neuter, and then adoption. This shortened timeframe for our puppies to get adopted means that they are not as exposed to many common shelter ailments that could place their health at risk.

Cleveland Animal Protective League: Dogly Do Good Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was put to general use, which means to help provide shelter and medical care to the more than 17,000 animals who we provide care for each year.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We rely solely on donations to care for the more than 17,000 animals who come through our doors each year.

How many pets did this grant help?

See above

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

When Mo arrived at the Cleveland Animal Protective League, you would never know that there was an adorable, 3-month-old puppy hiding beneath his severe injuries. You see, when Mo came to the Cleveland APL through our Dog Transfer Program, his left eye and right ear were badly injured. He was also full of worms and covered in ticks. Mo was in desperate need of care and medical attention, and that is exactly what he received when he arrived at the Cleveland APL.

Upon his arrival, Mo’s worms and ticks were treated, and because of the severity of his injuries, both his eye and ear needed to be removed. After spending time at the Cleveland APL getting lots of love, care and attention, Mo met his new family! Joey and her daughter Carly came to the APL one Wednesday afternoon in May in search of a four-legged addition to their family. Carly walked up to the kennel that Mo was sitting in and one look was all it took. Carly had tears in her eyes when she asked her mom if they could adopt Mo. She was afraid no one else would want him. Mo went home with Carly and her mom that day. The adorable pup is now a part of a large, loving family and still stays close to his sister Carly who fell in love with Mo that Wednesday afternoon in May at the Cleveland APL.

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program
What was the money or product used for?

Pet Transfer Program

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It paid for supplies and salaries for the dogs in our Pet Transfer Program.

How many pets did this grant help?

112

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

John Jay the Shepherd mix didn't have the easiest start to life. While his exact history is unknown, he came to The Animal Shelter of Texas County (TASTC), Missouri, as a stray who appeared to have been abused. However, he was a sweet dog who seemed eager to please, even if he didn't have the best manners. The great staff at TASTC decided John Jay was an excellent candidate for their Puppies for Parole program.

This program brings animals in need of additional socialization or obedience training into prisons and gives inmates an opportunity to help those dogs develop skills. The dogs live in the cells with their trainers and spend hours each day developing the skills they need to become wonderful members of the family. After 3-4 months, the dogs graduate and head back to their original shelters to find new homes.

John Jay excelled at the program, and came out knowing seven new skills: sit, lie down, stay, come, shake, roll over, and play dead. Whoever adopted John Jay was getting one heck of a dog! The staff at TASTC decided that this great pup deserved the best opportunity possible to find a new home, and they transferred him to the APA. Within just five days, John Jay found a fantastic home with plenty of kids to play with and to help him stay sharp on his skills. Everyone was so happy to see this wonderful dog find the family he deserved!