Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Cat Association of Topeka: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Sponsor a Pet money is used for the care and feeding of the cat chosen by the donor. All funds go directly to their daily care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant money is a big help in contributing to our operational costs to provide proper nutrition and veterinary care to the cats in our shelter. We are a small no-kill cat shelter, so some of our cats are long-term residents with special needs.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The cat the donor chose, Bumpers, has been in our care for several years. The donations made to sponsor him will help with his care and food for three months. This is especially helpful since he is a senior cat on a prescription diet. He is doing very well, and was recently moved to a larger room with lots of climbing shelves and a large sunny window. We are still hopeful that someone will open their home to him. In the meantime, he is very content and happy! We agree with the donor's comment: Senior cats rule!

Seminole County Animal Services: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The donations we have gotten from the Sponsor A Pet Program have been and will be used to spay and neuter some of our shelter cats. Typically an adopter pays for the spay or neuter of the cat they choose when they adopt. But we find that if some of the cats are already spayed or neutered and the adopter is allowed to adopt and take the cat home that day that it will give some cats the edge they need to get adopted. Our county shelter is not budgeted to pre-spay or neuter animals available for adoption, so this grant will help us to do this and get some cats adopted that may not have been.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It will help some of the cats we have get adopted quicker, so they can start their new lives in a home rather that spending more time at the shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

A $90 grant will neuter three male cats or two female cats with $10 left over.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Andy is a really friendly grey tiger cat that has just passed his two-month anniversary at the shelter. He is an awesome cat and gets along well with other cats but still he wasn't adopted. Andy and two of his cat friends, Junior and Django, will be neutered using the grant money.

Hearts United for Animals: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

It was used for the veterinary care for a rescued puppy-mill dog named Ghirardelli.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant was used for veterinary care of a puppy-mill dog that had serious health problems.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Ghirardelli is a little puppy-mill Pomeranian who arrived at HUA with many health problems. She required extensive veterinary care for pneumonia and other respiratory problems before she could have routine health care, and support was very important for her care. She became a happy, healthy little one after she received the care that she needed. We learned that she had been debarked, and that caused damage to her trachea which would not be overcome. Ghirardelli had a tendency to snort when she was doing active things. She was soon adopted and went to a home where her canine siblings are bulldogs. Since they all snort, too, Ghirardelli fit right in. What is most important is that her home is a very happy one for dogs, and Ghirardelli is very loved.

Shetland Shepdog Placement Servicees of NJ: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

We are a rescue, not a shelter. We foster shelties until they are adopted. But some of our fosters are very elderly and so ill that they cannot be adopted. They are "forever fosters." Our medical bills are very high for these dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

All donations go directly to vet care for our fosters.

How many pets did this grant help?

At least one forever foster's vet bills

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Angel came to SSPSNJ in October of 2012. Originally named Aggie, she was 10 years old at the time. She was covered in fleas. In fact, they were so bad that they were crawling around her eyes and over her nose. You could see the fleas all over her body. She needed lots of medical care. She literally had NO hair all along her back. She needed time for her skin to heal, a dental, to be spayed, removal of a mammary tumor, as well as senior-panel blood work, a thyroid panel, shots, and testing for heartworm and parasites.

Still, she is the sweetest sheltie that you would ever meet. She went right into her rescuer’s arms and snuggled in close, licking her hands and giving kisses.

In May of 2013, Angel’s foster mom noticed a difference in Angel’s eyes when she woke up in the morning. She rushed her to the vets. Angel has chronic glaucoma in her good eye and retinal detachment in the other eye, so she is now blind in both eyes caused from hypertension brought on by renal disease. Even though she had been on blood-pressure meds for months, her high blood pressure still did damage to the eyes. It can happen very quickly. She will never get her sight back, but she is now on an additional medication in hopes it will lower the high blood pressure, and also another eye drop.

As of April 2014, Angel’s foster mom reports that her condition is about the same. She has a wonderful appetite and is holding her own. Angel currently takes two different medicines for her blood pressure and she will be going in soon for another recheck for her eye and blood pressure.
Angel is managing on her own and seems to know her way around outside pretty well! Her favorite thing is still to get treats and to snuggle. She is a happy little girl.

Volunteers For Animals: KONG
What was the money or product used for?

We received 120 bags of KONG Cat Morsels cat treats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have many volunteers that come in each day to pet and socialize cats. Having healthy treats is a great way to make positive connections with the cats. Our volunteers really enjoy having the treats to use with the cats. It helps to bring scared cats out of their shells and gives outgoing kitties a chance to play and be rewarded. Thank you for providing this wonderful grant.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far approximately 60 cats and counting.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Snowy is an especially shy kitty. He came to us a stray and is really having a hard time adjusting to shelter life. We have been using the KONG treats with him to entice him out of his shell. We try to have a variety of volunteers mingle with him but always with treats. It is slowly making a difference with Snowy. And we will keep working with him. Thank you again for your generosity for shelter animals!

Humane Society of Warren County: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Funds from the Sponsor a Pet program in the first quarter of 2014 helped pets like Bailey receive the intensive medical treatment necessary following long-term neglect. Meet Bailey:
http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/28801040/

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped provide medical treatment for Bailey, one of six dogs seized by Warren County Animal Control due to neglect.

How many pets did this grant help?

One pet ($45)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bailey was one of six dogs seized by Warren County Animal Control due to neglect. The six dogs came to the Humane Society of Warren County underweight and suffering from severe skin infections. All six dogs were timid as they had never received much human contact. HSWC treated their skin conditions, fed them a high-quality diet and worked on socialization skills. The treatment took eight weeks, but now all of these wonderful, grateful pups are ready for their forever homes.

Pictured is Bailey. She is a mixed breed about 4 years old. Bailey is a very sweet girl who will make someone a loyal companion. She loves to give kisses and sit on furniture; we assume it’s because both of those things are new to her.

Thank you for giving dogs like Bailey a second chance. Your sponsorship makes a difference.

Hope Safehouse Inc.: Orvis Operation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Orvis Company grant through the Petfinder Foundation we were fortunate to receive helped to pay for part of the medical costs of a dog named Peach, previously known as Heather.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Donations and grants such as the Orvis operational grant through the Petfinder Foundation make it possible for HOPE to give animals like Peach all the medical and psychological attention they need to get better and eventually placed into loving forever homes that may not have had the resources nor the time to let the animal heal.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Peach (a.k.a. Heather) came to us from [an open-admission] shelter and had a number of medical issues, but the most severe was her back hip joint. The doctors believe she was kicked so hard that the joint was virtually destroyed. HOPE tried to have the joint repaired but the surgery was not successful and ultimately her leg had to be removed. With loving medical and psychological care, Peach has recovered nicely; three legs have not slowed her down and she is no longer in pain. The best news: Peach has been adopted by a family that loves and treats her right!

Humane Society of West Michigan: Bissell Rescue U
What was the money or product used for?

Shelter repairs (see below)

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our puppies love their fun new puppy room and the cats enjoy not breaking the shelves when they are lounging.

How many pets did this grant help?

It helped and will continue to help all the animals who come into our care.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We repaired our dog-park latches, which were broken and were being held together with bungee cords. We fixed our door to admitting, which was broken and no longer opening. We made over our puppy room by painting the walls, steam cleaning the floor, and drawing a fun mural. We replaced brackets which had broken in our cattery shelving. We were able to purchase shelving units for our training room closet, which holds supplies for many programs. Since the puppy room is much more friendly-looking, people seem to be more engaged with the puppies.

Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS): Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

As Maryland’s largest open-admission shelter, BARCS does not turn away any animal in need of shelter, food and a loving touch. BARCS grants refuge to every abandoned, neglected, abused, lost or surrendered animal that comes through our doors -- totaling over 12,000 animals annually.

The BARCS Medical Care Fund provides ongoing in-house medical care for all of our shelter animals, including antibiotics, vaccinations, testing, parasite control and spay-and-neuter surgery so that they are ready to be put up for adoption to the community. This is where the generous $1,000 Petfinder Foundation funding was used; it enabled us to get almost 35 female dogs spayed prior to their adoption!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Medical Care Fund was created to provide the funding for routine medical care for all 12,000 animals that come to BARCS at a cost of almost $500,000 annually. BARCS houses almost 250 cats and dogs in the shelter at any given time, plus over 700 more in foster care. The majority of animals that come to BARCS are not altered, have no proof of a vaccine history, and are often ill due to being neglected or abandoned. Once in the care of BARCS, all animals are vaccinated, provided with flea treatment and dewormer and are tested for various diseases as needed upon arrival. In addition, BARCS spays or neuters all of its animals in the shelter’s surgical suite prior to adoption.

Medical care for the animals at BARCS is the largest part of our budget and where funding for our shelter is always most critically needed. BARCS has dramatically increased the number of animals saved every year, but there are so many suffering, neglected and abandoned pets that still need our help and that require ongoing medical care and where funding from this grant was applied.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant enabled us to spay almost 35 female dogs before they were adopted!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sometimes it takes a village to find a forever home, and it's happy tails like these that remind us how amazing the rescue community can be! Shauna came to BARCS a few months ago after she was left tied to a pole. Neglected and suffering from a skin condition known as Demodex, Shauna's skin was very uncomfortable and her entire belly was red hot and hairless. Thanks to some networking and old friends, a former volunteer photographer at BARCS saw Shauna's picture online. It was love at first sight.

Shauna, now named Sunday, is finally home! After a few days at a local vet hospital to recover from her cold and finish up some of her skin medications, Sunday had the first-class treatment and caught a private plane to meet her new mommy in South Carolina! Living the high life as a Southern belle, Sunday's mastered the fine art of cuddling and loves her new family.

Coulee Region Humane Society, Inc.: Bissell Rescue U
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to build a play/exercise room for our cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our shelter has one communal room where cats can move about freely. All our other cats live in kennels. They have not had a designated play area and have had to wait for our multipurpose cat-evaluation and adopter-get-acquainted room to be empty in order to stretch their legs, play, race around the room and cuddle with volunteers. Thanks to you we were able to build a playroom.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helps the 30 cats and kittens who are in our adoption room every day. We placed 577 cats in 2013, almost all of whom lived in our adoption room at some point.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our playroom just passed its final inspection today. The first cat in the room is our oldest cat, Bria, a 17-year-old, black domestic short hair. Bria is very much in need of the exercise and stress reduction afforded her by time in this playroom. This ability to play is serious business for our cats. Stress is a problem for shelter cats and stress leads to illness, most commonly upper-respiratory infections. The ability to play and socialize helps reduce stress and we think our cats will be healthier as a result. We have that crazy little thing called hope – hope that this playroom will, literally, save lives. In addition, staff can use this room for our cat personality assessment program, Meet Your Match.