Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

The Humane Society and Animal Rescue of Muskegon County: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used the funds to build a 100' x 50' play yard for our dogs to enjoy playgroups.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It has made a tremendous difference in our shelter dogs' enrichment, training, and behavior. We have been able to exercise and socialize our dogs together. This has allowed the dogs to use the pent-up energy they have in the kennels, reducing the "kennel crazy" factor in our shelter. It also allows for our dogs to socialize, which is so very important for their adoptability factor: Adopters are able to see how they interact with other dogs and they are able to be adopted into homes that have other pets. This has by far been a huge factor in increasing our adoptions and reducing our returns. This renovation will indefinitely help our entire dog population.

How many pets did this grant help?

200

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Our sweet deaf boy Kaid has been with us for almost one year. He is a staff and volunteer favorite but has yet to find his forever home. He is like our mascot for this new play yard because he shows all of our new dogs how to interact in there. He runs WILD in there, looking like the happiest dog in the whole world! Before this yard, he would mainly be leash-walked, but now he can SHINE. We added a dog tunnel and some agility equipment to the yard and he is an absolute star on all of them. He teaches our new dogs how to play tag, run through tunnels, pause on the tables, and even jump the jumps! Kaid gives us hope at the shelter because, although he has called us home for too long, he couldn't be happier in this yard with his friends. Meet Kaid: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36627951

Sacramento SPCA: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to renovate a large Frisbee yard into three distinct play yards. This consisted of grading the yard to remove grass and weeds and route drainage to avoid flooding of the yard. New gates and barriers were installed to separate the yards and to allow for safe and easy entrance. Fencing was repaired or replaced as needed to ensure the yards are properly enclosed to avoid the possible escape of dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant is instrumental in helping reduce the stress of dogs in our care by allowing them time out of the kennels to run and play with other dogs. It also offers insight into their true personalities by allowing them to interact with other dogs in a social setting. Behaviors and interactions are noted on each dog’s record for easy retrieval when working with staff, volunteers, or potential adopters.

How many pets did this grant help?

We do not have a solid number at this time, as the playgroups were implemented in late August 2017.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Buffalo is an energetic 1-year-old terrier who has been with the Sacramento SPCA since Aug. 18, 2017. Buffalo is a healthy, energetic “linebacker” who LOVES to run. While in the renovated play yard, he can often be seen running and jumping with his tongue hanging out. The play yard provides an opportunity for Buffalo to show off his football skills while working through the excess energy 1-year-old dogs tend to have. Buffalo is still at the Sacramento SPCA, but we are hoping he finds his forever home soon! Meet Buffalo: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39325661

Humane Society of Lincoln County, New Mexico: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Enrichment toys for Humane Society of Lincoln County, New Mexico

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The toys have been used in several different ways; the most popular, of course, is peanut butter in the middle of the toy. Putting one of the Kong toys with peanut butter in a kennel with a rather large dog is not only safe for him to chew on but occupies the dog for a long time. Thank you for toys for our shelter animals. Because they are KONG toys, they will be around for a long time.

How many pets did this grant help?

All shelter animals

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

I have attached pictures of Cassie, a shelter employee, playing with Priscilla (first photo) and Oreo (second photo). Both dogs have been adopted.

Connecticut Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical Grant was used to support orthopedic surgery for George, a senior shepherd/hound mix who was rescued and brought to Connecticut Humane by a local animal control officer.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Connecticut Humane has a wonderful and talented full-time veterinary staff that treats a broad spectrum of pet illnesses and injuries. That said, specialized surgery like the one that George required for his leg is outside their realm of expertise. This grant enabled George to receive the care he needed from an outside orthopedic specialist. The senior pup had gone through so much in his life, and access to this surgery was a matter of quality of life. Thank you!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

George was on the run. The 8-year-old pooch was understandably panicked and confused—he was hurting from cuts on his body, and his hind leg wouldn’t work as he tried to run around town. It took three days, but Plainville Animal Control Officer Donna Weinhofer was able to rescue him and finally get him the help he desperately needed. It’s unclear what kind of trauma left George so badly injured, but the lacerations appeared as though they may have been inflicted by a knife. To start, he needed x-rays for his leg and treatment for the gashes. He later had his leg surgically repaired by an orthopedic specialist. Fast forward a few months and the German shepherd/hound mix was ready to find a forever home, having received veterinary care through CHS with help from the Petfinder Foundation's $1,000 grant.

With limited financial and medical resources, ACOs are rarely able to provide routine preventative care or treatment for medical conditions, and more extensive care is cost-prohibitive. That’s why CHS offers pro bono adoption and medical services to pets from animal-control and rescue partners—everything from spays, neuters and vaccinations for healthy pets, to complicated surgeries for health conditions. Sometimes they go back to their original facility for adoption, and other times, they’re adopted through CHS. Thanks to CHS's partnerships with ACOs and other organizations, more pets like George are given a second chance.

George was fostered by ACO Weinhofer, and as soon as he was medically cleared, he was adopted into the home of a loving family in Pennsylvania, where he now happily lives with his pet parents and his two other puppy siblings. He keeps all of his fans updated on his Facebook page: http://bit.ly/2wO4L8h. And thanks to the grant funding and generous donors, the veterinary department will have room for the next George who arrives needing a healing touch and a second chance.

Save the Strays Animal Rescue & Sanctuary: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Our fenced outdoor exercise area encompasses about half an acre. There are five large pens within that area where dogs can enjoy the outdoors individually or in pairs. The remaining open area is for supervised group play and human-canine interaction. We used our grant to purchase lumber, hardware and related supplies, as well as a variety of toys, to build items that might be typically be found at a dog park. Our goal was to create a richer environment for the dogs as they play individually, in groups, and with caretakers and visitors.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Thanks to the funds provided by the Petfinder Foundation, each of our individual pens now has a wading pool, toy-tug pole that enables the dogs to play tug of war by themselves, and multiple balls and other toys with which the dogs can amuse themselves. Items in the larger play yard now include a seesaw, taller and shorter balance beams (for large and small dogs), a platform with steps and slide, a tunnel, two tug-toy poles and two wading pools. These items provide opportunities to work on building the dogs' confidence in themselves and their own abilities, as well as their trust in humans -- something many strays and shelter dogs sorely need.

How many pets did this grant help?

We have 20 to 25 dogs at this location at any given time.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Delilah (first photo) is a 3- to 4-year-old boxer we rescued from a high-[intake] shelter, with scars on her body that tell us she had a hard start to life. We're using the seesaw, slide and balance beam as training aids to help her learn to trust and follow her human's commands and give her a sense of structure as she waits for a new home. Delilah will be available for adoption soon. Keebler (second photo) is a 6-year-old Pekingese who was found as a stray. Like many Pekes, he can be willful. We're using positive reinforcement (treats and toys) and activities like the balance beam to teach him cooperation. Keebler is available for adoption. His Petfinder URL iswww.petfinder.com/petdetail/38703630.

Clint is a 10-month-old mixed breed, rescued from a high-[intake] shelter, who has webbed feet and loves water, so he's really enjoying the wading pools we were able to purchase. He's also a little shy, so we're using the new playground equipment to build his confidence in himself and us. Clint will be available for adoption shortly.

Milo (fourth photo) is an 8-year-old, owner-surrendered pug who has been with us for almost two years. Milo has spondylitis, which makes his back legs weak and causes fecal incontinence and urinary retention, so he is one of our sanctuary dogs. Although he gets around without a mobility aid, he can't use any of the playground items we created with our Petfinder Foundation grant. So we made sure he got a variety of toys. His favorite? The treat-dispensing roller toy, of course!

THANK YOU, Petfinder Foundation, for helping us put more fun and creative stimulation into our dogs' lives!

Longmont Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Stray cat Red was brought to Longmont Humane Society after being hit by a car. Because Red’s injuries were significant, emergency care and surgery were administered that same day. Red was hospitalized and held by the shelter for a mandatory five-day stray-hold period, after which she was nursed to recovery in a medical foster home. Her injuries included a broken lower jaw, lacerations to her face and right hind area, and a hemorrhage to her right eye area. Red was pregnant and had no collar or identification, and no known owner. Emergency grant funds were used to care for Red.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Funds granted by the Petfinder Foundation helped save Red’s life and were used as follows:
1) Assessment of injuries (initial exam and radiographs) - $140
2) Emergency surgery to repair jaw and lacerations - $120
3) Medications - $117.67
4) Hospitalization/shelter care - $100
5) Feline leukemia/FIV testing - $12.99
6) Medical foster care - $345
7) Three recheck exams during healing - $67.50
8) Surgery to remove wire from healed jaw and extract broken tooth - $50
TOTAL: $953.16

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped save the life of one very special cat, Red.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Red was brought to Longmont Humane Society on March 31, 2017, after being hit by a car the night before. The damage to her face was significant. Our veterinary team went to work repairing Red’s jaw and giving her the best possible chance at a full life in an adoptive home. Red went to a loving foster home to heal and get the care she needed. Nearly a month later, the wire that held her jaw together was removed and she was soon ready for adoption. Red, now called Lexus, was quickly adopted. Her adopter declared Lexus her “soul kitty” and is so proud of the care she received and her resilient spirit.

Washington Wilkes Animal Shelter: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Money was used to treat heartworm-positive dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Prior to receiving the grant, we did not test our dogs for heartworm at all. The grant pushed us to start testing, treating (when financially able) and maintaining a monthly prevention so the negative dogs can stay negative.

How many pets did this grant help?

The money has helped 2-3 dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Madison was the first dog treated. She came to the shelter in May 2016. Once we received the grant, she went into foster care, was evaluated by a vet and started on antibiotics. An adopter stepped forward and adopted her in July 2017. The adopter assumed the financial cost of the rest of her treatment. Claira is now being treated. She was evaluated by a vet last month and started on her antibiotics. She should receive her injections later this month. She is still available for adoption. Meet Claira: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39267128

Jack had been in a foster home, but there was a misunderstanding by his foster family. This has delayed his treatment. If there is money left after Claira, we will use it for his treatment. If not, we will assume the cost. He is still available for adoption. Meet Jack: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/35883450

Palm Springs Animal Shelter: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Shade cover for our play yards (second photo) and fencing improvements, including an additional catch pen.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have a robust dog-enrichment program and have had Aimee Sadler come three times to strengthen our Dogs Playing For Life skills. We have seen our number of volunteers grow each year. However, the lack of shade structure has limited our play group during the May-through-September time frame, when temperatures become extreme and play groups must be completed before 10 a.m. or after 5 p.m. This grant allowed us to construct shade triangles, which have extended our play group times and allowed for more outdoor enrichment activities. This was especially important for the large breeds, who were limited in indoor enrichment due to space restrictions. Small dogs had the luxury of using our community room to play in and learn new skills when necessary.

How many pets did this grant help?

Our large-dog population is approximately 50-60 dogs at one time. This, of course, varies over the course of the year. Last year we had more than 1,300 large and small dogs come into the shelter, and on average that would mean 800 large-breed dogs using our play yards per year.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lilly Pad (first photo) had a high arousal rate and needed extended work in the yards with other dogs. Her primary trigger was other dogs while she was on-leash. She would get overexcited and actually redirect towards the handler -- biting up the leash and being very difficult to control. We couldn't work with her without the safety measures and shade provided by the grant, as having multiple dogs walking in the yard to trigger her and train her out of it safely would not be feasible without the yard improvements. After weeks of daily training to reduce her redirection, she went to a foster-to-adopt home. Her foster even had other dogs at the home, and they got along fine thanks to the time our enrichment team put in, and the play yard that allowed it to happen. We are pleased to say that her foster home became her permanent home on Aug. 22, 2017.

Mary Ann Morris Animal Society: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To rebuild kennel roofs that were torn off during bad thunderstorms. An entire section of roofs were destroyed and flung off the shelter. Fencing was damaged as well.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to use this money to help with the costs of rebuilding the roofs that provide shelter to our dogs. Our shelter is primarily an outdoor facility and this had affected approximately one entire line of kennels. The dogs now have new roofs overhead that are not in jeopardy of falling down. They do not leak and are built correctly so that, barring any unforeseen weather disturbance, they should last a long time.

How many pets did this grant help?

Our pens are large, and capable of housing several pets per kennel. So this grant most likely helps 16 pets at any given time.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Jazz and Val (first photo) are two of the dogs utilizing one of these kennels. Jazz was adopted from our shelter several years ago, but was recently returned. Since Jazz had been living in a home, we were happy to at least be able to provide him with a dry, spacious shelter where he can wait for his next home. Val has been with us for several months, waiting for her chance for a home. They are both pit-bull mixes, and those do not adopt out as quickly, so we want to give them the best we can while they reside with us.

Mobile County Humane Society, DBA Krewe de Rescue: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used to pay for the cost of vetting. Prior to adoption, all of our dogs receive age-appropriate vaccines, are spayed or neutered and microchipped. Puppies receive a minimum of two rounds of vaccines. They may receive three rounds if they are still in foster homes. We use three different veterinarians, but the average cost of vetting is $150 per puppy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped Krewe de Rescue by allowing us to pay the vet bill for eight dogs. Of those eight, six have been adopted and two are still in a foster home. We receive requests for assistance almost daily. We can only help if we have funds to pay for vetting.

How many pets did this grant help?

We were able to pay all or part of the vet bill for eight dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Polly (first and second photos) was pulled from a local high-intake shelter. She was scheduled to be euthanized because of a skin condition. The skin condition turned out to be a flea allergy. Polly was treated with 10 days of antibiotics and was adopted eight weeks later. Vanilla Bean (third and fourth photos) was found in a landfill. A man working picked her up and begged for assistance on Facebook. Krewe de Rescue took her, then went back to look for her mom. We ended up with four more puppies plus mom. Mom was transferred to another rescue, and three of Vanilla Bean's siblings were adopted before we received the grant. Vanilla Bean broke with parvo, so she and her brother Turmeric did not receive vaccines or get spayed or neutered until they were well. They have both since found forever homes.

We received a request for help with four puppies and their mom who were found as strays. The finder agreed to foster. Three of the puppies have been adopted and one will be transferred to a Northern rescue, but the mom, Daisy (fifth photo), is still available for adoption. Meet Daisy: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38554354