Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Portsmouth Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This money was used for tibia- and fibula-repair surgery performed by Dr. Murphy, Sr., at Anderson's Corner. The cost of this surgery was $1,600. Total medical expenses spent on helping Prince came to $2,600, which includes the emergency veterinarian bill and our veterinarian's bill.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Every animal that comes through the doors at the Portsmouth Humane Society receives the finest medical care possible. Often, this means taking on bills for needed procedures such as leg surgery and then figuring out how to raise funds to pay for it. The Petfinder Foundation Emergency Medical grant paid for a major piece of Prince's medical treatment and minimized the cost of his surgery on our overall budget. Partnerships and support from organizations and businesses are key to enabling our shelter to continue to save lives and provide specialty care as required.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped one very special little dog.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Prince is a 2-year-old stray male beagle who had been hit by a car. He received emergency medical attention and it was found that he was suffering from a fracture of his tibia and fibula. The surgery to repair his leg was complicated due to the breaks being so close to his knee, but he is on the mend. Prince has restricted mobility and regular checks with his doctor for the next two months, but is expected to make a full recovery. He is currently being fostered by one of our volunteers and when he is completely recovered, we will work to find him his forever home.

Blue Mountain Humane Society: Purina ONE Adoption Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Reduced dog-adoption fees!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Cost is one of the main barriers we see when trying to adopt out senior dogs or dogs with special needs. This grant helped us remove the cost barrier and get senior dogs and special-needs dogs into homes with loving families!

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sophia came to BMHS with a distended abdomen. The adopter was notified of her abdomen issues and chose to adopt her anyway. Once the adopter took her in for a free vet exam it became clear that she needed medical attention. The vet who examined Sophia thought that she might have cancer. After further examination, it was determined that she had a benign tumor. Today Sophia is doing great with her forever family!

Cache Humane Society : All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We partnered with Dog Is My Copilot (http://www.dogcopilot.org), a nonprofit animal-transport organization, to rescue 37 dogs from an over-capacity shelter in Merced, California. All dogs were over or approaching their due-out date and faced immediate euthanasia. The dogs were flown, free of charge, by Dog Is My Copilot. Petfinder Foundation support was used to vaccinate, spay/neuter, and care for the dogs in our no-kill shelter. As of March 25, 2016, 12 rescued dogs have already been adopted.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Cache Humane Society is the only shelter-based no-kill facility in northern Utah. We have high adoption rates and short times-in-residence for dogs, and we frequently have space to help out over-capacity [open-admission] shelters. The All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration grant allowed us to respond to an urgent transfer request from a municipal shelter to transport 37 dogs to our facility. We found loving homes for more than 800 dogs in 2015; with the Petfinder Foundation's support, we hope to place 1,000 dogs in 2016.

How many pets did this grant help?

37

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Vigo, Roxy, and Stella were about four weeks old when they were abandoned in the parking lot of a rural county animal-control facility. They were too young to be neutered and adopted, and no foster caregivers were able to take a litter. Cache Humane Society took them in, along with 34 other dogs, in a large rescue transfer. Dogs were transported, free of charge, by a private pilot through the nonprofit Dog Is My Copilot. They are happily in foster together and will be ready for adoption at 16 weeks.

Heart of Jackson Humane Society, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Medical expenses for Shawnee.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant, for the most part, took care of her chronic ear issues and made her adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

One - Shawnee, a purebred shar pei.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Shawnee is 2-3 years old and has obviously had chronic ear infections her entire life. After an ear flushing and numerous rounds of medications prescribed by a local vet, Shawnee was referred to a specialty clinic. Various procedures were performed, including a video otoscopy and myringotomy. Her ear was flushed, removing a large amount of debris, and a small hole was made in the ear drum to flush the middle ear and medication was placed in the space. The infection is gone but her ears will need to be flushed twice a week indefinitely. Shawnee was adopted on April 18, 2016. We have continued to follow her progress and she is doing well.

Committee Concern for Cats, Inc.: Technology
What was the money or product used for?

Community Concern for Cats, Inc., used the technology grant funds for the purchase of three wireless credit card terminals and data service for our adoption sites, per our grant application to you. The costs were as follows:

Three Ingenico Terminals (model IWL250G): $599.25 per unit
Three SIM cards: $20.00 per unit
Monthly data service fee: $19.00 per unit

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Previous to the purchase of these credit card terminals, we were encouraging cash or checks at our adoption sites. If a credit card was used, it was batch processed after the adoption paperwork came from the sites. This created a situation where many of the credit cards were declined due to incorrect/incomplete information or lack of funds. We would then spend precious volunteer hours contacting adopters whose cards we were not able to process. Now we can accept and process credit cards in real time, which makes the adoption process much smoother.

How many pets did this grant help?

A third of our adoptions involve credit cards. So we estimate 205 cats per year will be helped by this grant.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Batman has a superhero name because this little 6-month-old black cat survived being hurled out the window of a moving car. A family drove to the local county shelter. The father stated that they were moving and could not keep the cat. The shelter had a temporary moratorium on pet surrenders and the man was told to take the cat to another shelter. Instead, he dumped the cat outside the shelter door. When he was stopped from doing this by a shelter employee, he threw his cat into the car and drove off. Our Community Concern for Cats member saw it all and suspected the cat was in danger. She followed the car several blocks in time to see the man toss Batman out the window and into a ditch. Our member ran to pick up the terrified cat.

Once safe, he got the CC4C pre-adoption treatment: neutered, micro-chipped, vaccinated, treated for fleas and worms, and showered with love. Despite his rough start, Batman is friendly and loves attention. He has been adopted through our pet-store adoption site and is now living happily with a lovely couple – a home much kinder than the one he used to know.

Thanks, Petfinder Foundation, for your technology grant! We have put these funds to good use improving our adoption process so we can focus on the important work of rescuing and adopting the cats.

Lawrence Humane Society: Dogly Do Good Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $500 Dogly Do Good grant was used to provide advanced medical care and dental procedures to more than 20 Yorkshire terriers and papillons who entered our care as a result of a Department of Agriculture seizure.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This Dogly Do Good grant provided support that allowed the Lawrence Humane Society to dedicate resources to the care of more than 20 dogs who entered our care as the result of a state seizure. The dogs had been severely neglected and were in need of advanced treatment.

How many pets did this grant help?

20

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Noah, one of the more than 20 Yorkshire terriers and papillons who entered our care via a state seizure, had been severely neglected. His fur was long and matted, and due to the lack of grooming Noah had received, some of his fur had gotten into his mouth and wrapped around his teeth. In addition, the poor, scared little pup had severe dental issues. The situation broke the hearts of every employee at the Lawrence Humane Society. Thanks to the Dogly Do Good grant we received, our staff and volunteers were able to provide Noah -- and all the dogs that came from the seizure -- the care and attention they needed, including advanced dental procedures, grooming, and lots of love.

Noah soon gained confidence, and his personality started to shine. Once he made his adoption debut, it was only a matter of days before he found an incredible home with a family that cherishes him.

Bark And Roll Rescue Companions: All-Star Dog Rescue Celebration Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Microchips, $350; vaccinations, $200; 15 spays $1,500; 10 neuters $500

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to care for many more animals due to the financial support from the All-Star grant. We were able to take funds that were typically allocated to ready pups for adoption (used for spay/neuter, microchip, vaccination, vet exams) since we had the grant for those needs and use those funds for heartworm treatment, as well as to assist many people in the community with spaying and neutering their personal animals to decrease the number of unplanned litters.

How many pets did this grant help?

85+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Maggie (first photo) was pulled from [an open-admission] rural shelter. She was terrified and took days before she would even let us touch her. She was heartworm-positive, malnourished, and had hair loss. Had we not received this grant we would have never had the extra funds to take on her emotional and physical needs. However, due to the generosity of this grant, we were able to take the funds we had previously allocated for adoption readiness and put it toward her treatment. Maggie is alive and living in her home today because of this grant.

Huck and Finn (second and third photo) are two pups who were surrendered to us feral, with hair loss related to flea infestation, at 10 weeks. Again, because of the money for the grant to provide adoption-readiness for our animals, we were able to take the previously allocated funds to purchase flea meds and we are happy to report that these boys are flea-free, their hair is grown back and they are playful, sweet, happy pups awaiting their forever homes. UPDATE: Finn has been adopted!

Meet Huck: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/35037690

Remembering Ruthie Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $600 Emergency Medical Grant was used to completely vet two Chihuahua sisters we took in from their owners as they were losing their home and needed to re-home them.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Had we not gotten this grant when we did, we would not have been able to save Alicia and Brie. As a small, one-person rescue in an area where there are hundreds of rescues, we do not receive a lot financial help from donors.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

These are the two little cuties we have been posting for foster and funds for. While they haven't had the best of lives, their owner did the best she could, considering she rescued them from certain death as the family who had the litter was killing them as they were born by flushing one down the toilet and allowing their 13-year-old to stomp another to death. They are 4 years old and pretty social considering they lived on the wood porch seen in the photo.

Brie (the black/tan dog) was born with only one eye. Even though she never had it, she is somewhat more nervous than her sister Alicia. Brie checked out healthy at the vet visit besides some dandruff. Alicia, on the other hand, no so much. She is a very happy, social girl. She doesn't mind all the other dogs; even though she's not sure about the bigger ones, she hasn't growled or anything at them. She's been running around the house with her tail held high, wagging a mile a minute.

When they got to their foster home they took her out to potty and she didn't want to come in. You see, they had both lived on a porch, never touching the ground or grass or even getting a lot of room to run. Sadly, Alicia has a few medical issues her sister does not. She is a moderate heartworm-positive, has retained canines, and a luxating patella (a problem with her knee popping out of its socket). Both girls DO NEED DENTALS besides Alicia's canine removal.

Sunrays Pit Bull Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds awarded were used to treat our dog Tillie. She came to us and tested positive for heartworm. She received the recommended treatment by the American Heartworm Society, including prescription Heartgard and three doses of melarsomine, followed by Advantage Multi.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant money enabled us to give Tillie the best chance of surviving this horrible disease. She came to us very ill and, even though she is still recovering, has shown us that she is a survivor. She is a sweet girl who is full of life!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tillie was in [an open-admission] shelter. When she was transferred she developed a cough. She was taken to the vet where it was discovered that her cough was due to being heartworm-positive. Treatment was immediately started. She received the recommended three doses of melarsomine and Advantage Multi. She is well on her way to being 100% clear of this debilitating disease. She is a happy girl and will make someone an amazing companion. Meet Tillie: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/35150642

Beartooth Humane Alliance: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Thanks to the $500 Petfinder Foundation grant, Beartooth Humane Alliance was able to offset the total medical bill of $1,181.51 for a young homeless cat with a rear-leg injury.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In mid-November, a 6-7-month-old intact female kitten was found homeless in a rural Montana town. She was extremely friendly and it was evident she trusted humans and was seeking out human companionship. After a thorough search for an owner proved unsuccessful, the finder surrendered her to Beartooth Humane Alliance for medical care and adoption. In the initial medical assessment, she presented for a non-weight-bearing and painful right hind leg. Upon examination, it was found that her temperature was 103.2, she was grossly underweight, and her stifle [knee joint] was swollen, hot, and painful. Radiographs indicate no trauma and physical exam reveals no punctures or bruising. Some muscle atrophy noted. Our vet treated her with Convenia, an antibiotic, hoping to reduce joint infection, and an anti-inflammatory and pain reducer, Rimadyl. The finder was willing to foster her to provide rest for two weeks. Incidental finding: She had bilateral ear mites and was treated for them.

At the end of November, the follow-up exam revealed the leg was getting worse and more painful and she had a tremendous amount of muscle atrophy up to her hip. The joint was thickened and the vet could palpate bony growth on the medial side of the stifle. It was non-weight-bearing. While the kitten was sedated, her joint was tapped to check for infection via a culture and microscopic examination. During this procedure, she had quite a bit of pain via vocalization. Convenia was repeated and compounded oral tramadol was ordered. Culture reported: no growth.

She showed no improvement by mid-December and, in fact, when she wasn’t holding the leg high enough, her toes hit the ground, causing her extreme distress. Plans were made to amputate on Dec. 17, 2015 including spay if amputation was routine.

During prep for the surgery, the vet noted she had severe muscle atrophy all along the leg. During manipulation, her heart rate spiked, requiring more isoflorane. Amputation was mid-femur and there were no complications, so she was spayed. Prognosis for a full recovery and pain-free life was good.

Named Tripod, she was sent to an experienced foster home on antibiotics and pain-control medications. Gross examination of the joint revealed severe bony growth inside the joint, especially on the medial side, with no normal epicondyles or meniscus.

How many pets did this grant help?

one

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The day after Tripod's leg amputation, the foster home reported she was doing well, very happy, getting around without any issues, and seemed overall in better spirits. She was a very sweet patient and, although her medical situation demanded extraordinary attention, we felt that her age, temperament and prognosis for a full recovery required giving her the opportunity to live a long and healthy life. Despite her having three legs, Tripod’s Christmas wish was granted when she was adopted Christmas week by her foster family, who shower her with love and attention.

Here is what one of the foster family’s children, MacKenna, age 11, writes about Gizmo (formerly known as Tripod): "When I first saw Gizmo, I felt worried for her because she couldn't walk on one of her legs. When I started fostering her I knew that her right hind leg was causing her a lot of pain. Now I am glad that she doesn't have pain any more since she had surgery. Before she had surgery she hid a lot; now she is coming out more for attention.
       
"We adopted her because she is sweet and a snuggle bear. My little sister, who is 9, and I love to play with our dog, Rose, and our other cat, Bell, and now we have Gizmo. I think she is cool because she likes to lie on her back and get her belly rubbed."