Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Adopt a Golden Atlanta: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

100% of all donations we receive each quarter from generous supporters through the Petfinder Foundation's Sponsor A Pet program go directly toward the medical expenses of our rescues. AGA does not have a facility. Instead, we rely on generous donors, our 250+ volunteers, and our dedicated fosters to lovingly care for each rescue and ensure it receives all of its needed medical care prior to adoption.

Petfinder Foundation donations such as those received in 2014 were most likely allocated toward funds that pay for AGA's intake wellness exam given to every rescue brought into our care. This exam includes all vaccinations, a thorough assessment by AGA partner veterinarians of the rescue's physical health, a fecal exam, a heartworm diagnostic test, medicated baths and grooming, flea and tick medication, and microchipping. Each rescue is different; during this intake exam, our vets may determine that a rescue requires x-rays, to be spayed or neutered, some form of surgery, urgent care, pain or other medications, grooming, or ongoing observation for a period of time.

We are grateful to the Petfinder Foundation and its donors for their continued support, generosity, and kindness.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Monies received from the Foundation are allocated directly to the veterinary care required by each rescue taken in at AGA. These funds help us ensure our golden and golden-mix rescues are in their best health prior to adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will have paid for half of a wellness exam. In 2013, we received just over $200, so these funds would have covered the wellness exams of four (4) new rescues.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Corbin was found in May 2014 as a stray in Cobb County, GA, without any identification. He was vaccinated and neutered at the county Animal Control and then transported back to Atlanta by AGA. Corbin is a small Golden mix and has since been adopted (in February 2015). He was underweight at 35 lbs. and weighed just over 40 lbs. when adopted. According to Corbin’s Wellness Intake Exam at VCA Braelinn Village Animal Hospital in Atlanta: Heartworm test results were positive but his treatment was deferred until after leg surgery. He completed his treatment and was declared heartworm-negative at the end of September. He fecal-tested positive for hookworms and he was de-wormed immediately. He had an old leg fracture causing lameness. On May 31, Corbin was operated on to repair and reset his poorly healed right back femur. He had a fractured left lower canine tooth which needed extraction, and moderate tartar. This extraction took place in a separate procedure under general anesthesia because his leg operation was too prolonged and involved to add in another procedure.

The Rescued Dog: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Operational expenses: vet fees

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to spay/neuter four dogs, and provide acute care for a postpartum female requiring subcutaneous fluids and testing to rule out parvo.

How many pets did this grant help?

Five

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We saved Roscoe from San Bernardino City Animal Control on Dec. 16, 2014. He was confiscated by Animal Control because the person he was left in the care of for dog sitting was arrested. Turns out that the dog sitter was the brother of his owner but the owner never came to claim him. We pulled him on his review date. When we got him out, it was clear that he couldn't breathe well, so we took him directly to the vet, where he was diagnosed with pneumonia and we started daily nebulizers for seven days and antibiotics. After that cleared up, he was neutered and ready for adoption. He was adopted to a lovely couple on Jan. 13, 2015 and they adore him!

Jackson Madison County Humane Society: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

We used this grant to lower the adoption fees of the felines from $80 to $60 and, in some rare cases, to $40.

The felines who were adopted were fully vetted before adoption. They were all tested for FELV/FIV, received the required number of vaccines, their rabies vaccine and were all spayed or neutered.

The response we got from the adopters was fantastic. We really didn't have a problem getting a picture taken here at the shelter of the feline with their new family (if they were adopted from here) or even sending us one or two if they were adopted from the cat adoption center out at PetSmart. Unfortunately, we didn't get a picture of every cat adopted, but we tried.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Without this grant, we would not have been able to adopt out all of our cats (but three) that were ready for adoption. Some of them would still be sitting here at the shelter waiting for their homes. And, as long as we have some waiting for their homes, we are not able to help any more until we have openings, so this grant was a godsend to us at JMCHS.

How many pets did this grant help?

45 felines

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had an adopter by the name of Michael, a college student (first photo). He saw a cat, Cleopatra, that was posted on our website and fell in love with her. Unfortunately, he lived in Knoxville, TN, and we are located in Jackson, TN -- a four-and-a-half-hour drive, one way. He sent his mom up to check Cleopatra out and see what she thought of her. Needless to say, she fell in love with her too. Mom and Grandma picked Cleopatra up and drove the four and a half hours to deliver Cleopatra to her new dad, spent the night and drove another four and a half hours to get home. Michael has kept us updated on Cleopatra and she is loving her new home and the Cat Condo tower he bought for her before she arrived (second photo).

The other story is about black-and-white Chilly Willy and orange-and-white Fabian (third photo). Their family came in to check out the cats and immediately fell in love with Chilly Willy. He was putting on quite a show that day just for them. Mom saw Fabian and fell head over heels in love with him. They adopted both of them and are quite content together, as you can see in the pictures. The kids love the cats as well, and we have heard that Fabian is a great cuddle buddy and they both sleep with mom and dad in bed.

With Aubree and Ashton, the family came in looking for just one cat, but, as things happen, mom and dad fell in love with one and the kids fell in love with another, so to make a great ending, they adopted both of the cats and they are both loving their new forever home and being spoiled rotten.

York Adopt-A-Pet: Cat Chow Building Better Lives
What was the money or product used for?

The money enabled YAAP to waive or reduce adoption fees for cats in our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our adoption numbers were at an all-time high in December because we were able to waive adoption fees to adopters that would otherwise not be able to afford the adoption fee. We were also able to offer 2-for-1 adoptions to families that wished to adopt two cats.

How many pets did this grant help?

21 to date

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Phyllis had great loss in 2014. She tragically lost her daughter, two of her sisters and her beloved cat. Phyllis's therapist suggested she adopt a cat and sent a letter to her apartment complex asking that she be able to do so. Phyllis's daughter had been a YAAP volunteer prior to her death and she had picked out a cat (Buffy) that she felt would fit perfectly for her. When Phyllis came to YAAP, she fell in love with Buffy but also Nova. Because of this Purina grant, we were able to place both cats in Phyllis's home at no cost to her. Thank you for helping us make Phyllis's life a little brighter and giving us the opportunity to place two cats in a loving home.

Seminole County Animal Services: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Spay and neuter of our adoptable pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By helping more animals become highly adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three cats

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Oliver is a handsome 1-year-old male. He came to the shelter because his owner could no longer care for him. He is a super sweet boy and looks so adorable with his big sad eyes. He also has a small tuft of black hair on the top of his head. Oliver weighs 8 pounds, gets along well with other cats and he will be neutered before going to his forever home thanks to the Sponsor A Pet program!

Meet Oliver: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31534368/

Central Oklahoma Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used for general operating expenses within our adoption program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant assisted our organization in purchasing food for animals in our adoption program while in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant provided food for 303 animals within our adoption program.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mouse was surrendered to the Central Oklahoma Humane Society as a 5-week-old puppy, weighing less than a pound -- the owner was unable to provide enough time and care. A foster home was found and Mouse stayed with them for several weeks until she was old enough to be spayed and adopted. The grant generously provided the funding needed to cover the cost of food for Mouse and others like her while they were in our care.

Wood County Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Orvis Animal Care Grant monies allowed us to provide more hours for our dog trainer, Scott Beard, to work with the dogs we house in our shelter, and also allowed for several home visits to dogs adopted from our shelter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Wood County Humane Society employs a part-time dog trainer to work with all dogs that enter the shelter, as well as after they are adopted, in an effort to keep them in their forever homes if any issues arise post-adoption. Being awarded this grant allowed us to provide more hours for our dog trainer to work more with our dogs, to do home visits for some of our dogs (post-adoption), and to train our volunteers how to handle the dogs in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

All dogs entering and leaving our shelter between December 2014 and February 2015 (33).

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Orvis Animal Care Grant helped 33 dogs between December 2014 and February 2015. It is hard to highlight specific dogs helped during this period, because they were all helped! Of the 33 dogs we took in during this period, 18 have since found their forever homes. Our dog trainer, Scott Beard, works with all dogs entering our shelter, and also does a post-adoption follow-up to make sure the dogs and adopters are adjusting well after adoption. When dogs arrive at our shelter, they are assessed to see what they know and what they need work on. Scott then works closely with the staff and volunteers so they are able to continue training during all interactions with the dogs.

Humane Society of Lincoln County (HSLC): Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funding of $1,000 was used to spay/neuter shelter cats and dogs to make them more adoptable and facilitate their adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Animals that are spayed or neutered give potential adopters an added incentive to select them over those that are still intact. Adopters don't have to wait for surgery appointments or worry about their pet recovering from surgery. The HSLC has already taken care of that.

How many pets did this grant help?

Grant funding allowed the HSLC to spay eight female dogs, eight female cats, four male dogs and two male cats. It was used to sterilize a total of 22 shelter animals.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Unless they’re a cute, bubbly puppy or a desirable purebred, many shelter dogs get passed over without a second glance. That was the case with Abbott and Costello, two adult brothers found as strays. These big (Pyrenees mix?) boys came into the shelter shy and uncertain, but once they were cleaned up, neutered and given regular meals, they relaxed in their new digs. They were just two friendly guys who got along with everyone – people and other dogs. But no one noticed how cool they were. Even being featured in the EVT Shelter Voice got no interest.

So it was decided to take them to an off-site adoption event at a PetSmart store. Just before their trip, however, Costello came down with an infected toe that had to be amputated, so he was left behind. Abbott went and, not surprisingly, attracted a lot of attention, since he is one cool dude. Mr. Barber was particularly smitten. He and his wife walked Abbott around inside and outside the store before finally deciding to adopt him. Mr. Barber was interested to learn that Abbott had a brother who was also up for adoption and expressed an interest in seeing him if Abbott worked out.

Several weeks later, HSLC volunteers took several dogs, including Costello, back to PetSmart. Mr. and Mrs. Barber and Abbott (now Dakota) met them. It was a happy reunion for the two brothers. And, you guessed it, they are both now part of the Barber family.

According to Mr. and Mrs. Barber, Dakota and (now) Kennedy love to go for walks -- especially to the bark park. It's hard to tell which they enjoy more -- people or the other dogs. They get along with everyone. They love watching squirrels, birds, and other animals. The Barbers are installing fencing so Dakota and Kennedy can have the freedom of their own yard.

If Dakota and Kennedy have a problem, the Barbers say, it is their occasional bouts of youthful exuberance. Being only a year or so old, they still need some training and discipline, but Mr. Barber feels that will come with time. Even though they have different and distinct personalities, they watch out for each other just like brothers they are.

It just goes to show that getting animals away from the shelter where people can see their unique personalities and maybe envision them in their own homes really helps. It also helps that the HSLC has the resources to spay and neuter these animals so they can go to off-site adoption events and, hopefully, directly into a new home. It worked for two brothers, didn’t it?

Helping Hand Pet Rescue of West Virginia : A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received 100 dog vaccines.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to help all the dogs currently in our care.

How many pets did this grant help?

100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We currently have a dog named Leo who came into our rescue with a broken leg. We were able to administer the vaccine before his surgery, helping save some on the vet bill. Later, after he was healed, he was able to find his forever home. The new adoptive parents were very impressed that he was in such a healthy condition and up-to-date on all vaccines.

Pitter Patter Animal Rescue Inc: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant was used for vet care -- emergency vet care that was needed in order to save their lives. This money helped with medical care expenses, surgical procedures, medications, treatment, and ICU.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped the organization and all the pets in the care of the rescue by helping with these expensive vet bills. This grant is so appreciated.

How many pets did this grant help?

Four-plus

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Paisley (first photo) is a little black Lab who was dumped in the emergency room with slashes all over her little body. She was cut up like a cucumber and had lost a lot of blood. She had a big skull fracture. She needed emergency surgery to save her. Sparticus (second photo) is a shepherd mix who came to the rescue from death row with foreign items in his stomach. He was a little bag of bones. He needed to have the items in his stomach pass or be removed. He needed TLC to get some weight on and be a healthy, bouncy baby boy. Ben and Jerry (third photo) are two pit bull pups who, at only hours old, needed to be in the intensive care unit. The owner of a momma dog let her suffer and did not get vet care when a baby got stuck in her birth canal. Momma and four other babies did not make it, but Ben and Jerry received emergency vet care, which included the ICU. (Jerry is in the fourth photo.) We are happy and honored to report that all these furbabies are happy, healthy, alive and well.

Adopt Paisley: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/30287559/
Adopt Sparticus: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/30287569/
Adopt Ben and Jerry: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/31232861/