Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Providence Animal Center: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This grant was used to purchase enrichment items for the dogs in our kennels in order to keep them mentally and physically stimulated. Thanks to Orvis and the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to purchase Weiss Walkie harnesses, KONG Wobbler treat-dispensing toys, and Rescue Remedy aromatherapy water additive.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Enrichment items like KONG Wobblers and Rescue Remedy keep our dogs physically and mentally stimulated and reduce their levels of stress while they wait for adoption. This reduces their incidence of illness and shortens their average length of stay. Weiss Walkie harnesses make it easier for staff, volunteers, and visitors to walk our more energetic and athletic dogs, which means they can go out on more walks during the day. All of these things mean that we can adopt out out more dogs and save more lives!

How many pets did this grant help?

Our kennels hold about 50 dogs, who will all benefit from these enrichment items. Since we only use a few drops of Rescue Remedy at a time and since the harnesses and toys can be washed and re-used, we can safely estimate that several hundred dogs will benefit from these new enrichment items.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Littles (first and second photos) is a 2-year-old pit bull-type dog who was rescued from a local high-volume animal control facility. He is a sweet and friendly boy who loves attention! His KONG Wobbler helps him pass the time in between walks from visitors. Joltik (third photo) is a 5-year-old mastiff blend who was rescued from a nearby high-volume animal control shelter. He enjoys trotting around the grounds and rolling in the grass. His walks are made even more comfortable using his new Weiss Walkie harness!

Animal Compassion Team: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to cross-fence our large play yards, add gates, and install paving stones in the entries and along the fence line. A shade canopy was also added.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As we are a no-kill rescue, dogs in our care sometimes stay for prolonged periods of time. Our staff and volunteers make their quality of life a priority. Two years ago, we implemented the Dogs Playing for Life program at our little shelter and we love it! Prior to the renovation, we were limited to two very large play yards to run groups; it was difficult to supervise groups of dogs in such a large area, and only two groups of dogs could be out at a time. As part of the renovation made possible by the Petfinder Foundation grant, we created multiple smaller yards (connected by gates) and reinforced their boundaries. Now, with a team of trained volunteers, we can get out almost all of our 50 large-breed dogs at one time! That means more dogs get play time, and their sessions last longer. We've got happier, healthier dogs (which translates into more adoptable dogs), and it's also given our volunteer program a boost!

How many pets did this grant help?

ACT houses at least 50 large-breed dogs at any given time. All of them use the various yards created with the renovation grant each day. Of course, as dogs are adopted, new dogs take their places in the kennels. Since the renovation, several hundred dogs have enjoyed our Petfinder Foundation-sponsored play yards, and we look forward to many years of play in the future!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Play groups (and the Dogs Playing for Life program) help our rescue's inhabitants in many ways. For some dogs who come in scared, shy and lacking socialization, regular dog-to-dog interactions are a lifesaver. Charlie, a petite young pit bull, came to us terrified and virtually hairless due to a bad case of demodectic mange. Addressing his medical needs was the easy part. At first, the little guy only wanted to hide and had to be carried out of his kennel, frozen in fear. After several days of play group with friendly, easygoing dogs, Charlie started to loosen up and gain confidence. By the end of two weeks, he would dash out of his kennel, eager to play with his buddies, and he would greet new people at the fence with a grin and tail wag. Charlie's new family fell in love watching him frolic in our yard, and now he's got a home!

For other dogs who come to us already friendly, play group is the only way to keep them physically and emotionally healthy. Mel, an Australian shepherd-pit bull mix (pictured), is an outgoing, bouncy, rough-and-tumble kind of guy. Without regular sessions in the yards with his friends, Mel would, without a doubt, suffer from severe kennel stress. But because he gets out into the yards every morning and afternoon, Mel stays calm and approachable in his kennel. Because our volunteers spend time with him in play group, we've also been able to get to know Mel well, and can advocate for him with confidence. We have faith that his forever family will find him very soon! (Meet Mel at www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38338737.)

Humane Society of Raleigh County: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Kongs were used for enrichment and mental stimulation of shelter dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Enrichment has been a great added resource for our pets. The mental stimulation has been priceless and helped to keep them more healthy and adoptable.

How many pets did this grant help?

More than 100. We sterilize the Kongs and use them for different dogs each day.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cody, Kanin, Skippy, and Zack are all long-term residents at the Humane Society of Raleigh County, meaning they've been at the shelter for 2-3 years. All four have quirks that make adoption difficult. These quirks make them unique. All four needed stimulation to keep from going kennel crazy. The Kongs have done just that. They give these four dogs something to do besides stare out of their kennel door. Instead of barking, jumping, and acting out, all four dogs now have something that is a stress reliever. Mental stimulation can wear out a dog much more quickly than physical activity; therefore, working to extract treats and frozen peanut butter from a Kong makes life in a kennel not so horrible. The dogs now have something to look forward to, something they enjoy -- and that is a beautiful thing.

Meet Cody: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38289656
Meet Kanin: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39054544
Meet Skippy: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39054545
Meet Zack: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39054543

Last Chance Ranch Animal Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Medical care for Cooper, a golden retriever who came to Last Chance Ranch with a leg injury. The funds were used for x-rays, bandaging and his neuter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to x-ray Cooper to determine if he would need surgery, as well as neuter him and bandage his leg to support it while it healed.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The money donated through the Sponsor A Pet program was utilized for the veterinary care for Cooper. Cooper is a 3-year-old golden retriever who arrived at our rescue after sustaining an injury to his leg. After an x-ray, it was determined that Cooper would not need surgery. The veterinarian wrapped it, so that stabilized the injury so the leg could heal. Cooper has been on crate rest for six weeks and is going to be adopted by one of our staff members! His leg will be x-rayed one more time to ensure that everything is healing properly and then he will be well on the road to recovery!

Underdog Pet Rescue of Wisconsin: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money donated was for our Sponsor a Pet program. It went toward adoption fees of the animals sponsored to act as an incentive to potential adopters.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The money donated by supporters, $67.50, went to help cover some of our medical costs (which our adoption fee helps cover). It helped us adopt out the animals more quickly than they perhaps would have been adopted otherwise.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Chessie is one of our sponsored cats. Her foster mom donated to help her get adopted, and soon after her sponsorship was noted in her Petfinder profile, she received a great application. Chessie is reportedly doing very well in her new home.

Apollo Support & Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used for the medical care of a Chihuahua named Wendy.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us by providing medical care that was needed in order to make Wendy available for adoption so she could be spayed and get blood work, x-rays and more.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wendy is still available for adoption, as she was on hold for a while due to her health. She has not been spayed yet as we are trying to get some weight back on her after a bought of not eating and feeling well. We used the funds to get her multiple rounds of blood work, x-rays, medication and more. The first vet we took her to thought she had heart failure, so they performed x-rays and blood work and listened to her heart during an exam. There was no coughing present, but she had lost weight over the last few months and has a heart murmur, so we all agree that it must be true. The medication did not make her feel well and she wasn't gaining weight, so we took her to a second doctor to get another opinion.

Through the second blood work and examination, they determined she did not have heart failure and took her off of her medication. Right now she is on no medicine, and is eating only wet food so that she can try to gain back the weight she lost. Once she gains the weight back we will see if she can finally be spayed and get her dental done that she still desperately needs. During that time, Wendy also had a skin infection that she had special spray for, as she was licking her legs constantly.

Wendy is a very little girl with a big personality. She does take a while to warm up to other people, as she lived with a mentally disabled person in the past who yelled at her often. When she gets scared she will fall over on her side. The good thing is that, over the last months that we have had her, she has come out of her shell a lot. She gets excited when her foster comes in the room and is all tail wags! She likes other dogs but can be a bit picky over food sometimes. Wendy has a deformed arm, most likely due to an old break from when she was a puppy, but it does not cause her harm or really disable her much from moving around. She can still jump up on a couch or a lap with ease. Wendy is doing well going to the bathroom on puppy pads and likes to cautiously explore the back yard as well.

Meet Wendy: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38986242

Frankies Furry Friends Rescue, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The donation was used for vet bills.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Every bit of money that comes in helps our furry friends. Currently we have 11 dogs in foster care. The vet expenses for all the dogs can really mount up. We had one dog who had to have enucleation of both eyes and that was very expensive.

How many pets did this grant help?

We put it towards Petey's eye surgery.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Petey is a rat terrier who came into rescue very scared of everything. The volunteers worked with him and he gained trust in humans. He was adopted out to a loving home, but the adopter had to work longer hours and was not home with him enough so she thought it best if he came back to his foster home. Once he was back in foster care, it was noticed that his eyes seemed swollen, and he was taken to our vet for a complete eye check-up. He was diagnosed with floating lens and we knew that he had to have his eyes removed. Surgery was scheduled; he did fine through surgery and his recovery has been unremarkable. He is now playing with his foster mom with his favorite toy: a ball that squeaks so it is easier for him to find. He has not been listed on our website yet since he is still adjusting to everything. He will be looking for a special home that can provide all the guidance a blind dog needs.

Max's Animal Rescue and Humane Society: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To stimulate dog minds to be active and play

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are a very rural shelter with no foot traffic, so anything that can bring some activity to these animals is very much appreciated!

How many pets did this grant help?

Several we received 5 Kong's different sizes so about 40-50 different dogs played with them and are still playing with them.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Andy, as of today, is still up for adoption. Andy is a senior, 8-10 years old, who was dumped because he was old. He came here very sad, depressed and confused, constantly looking for someone or something. He has learned to love treats, toys (KONGs are his favorite), and leash walks. Thank you for putting a light back in his eyes by offering this grant. As you can see by his photo, he's actually smiling. I believe his KONG brought that to him. Meet Andy: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38939060

Circle of Friends Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The donation was used to sponsor the adoption fee of Plum, one of our adoptable cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to increase the chances of finding one of our animals a home. Whenever we get funds intended for sponsored adoption fees, we always aim to sponsor the animals that have characteristics that make it more difficult for them to get adopted, such as behavior, age, or medical issues.

How many pets did this grant help?

One.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Plum was a highly affectionate cat who was at Circle of Friends for nearly three months prior to adoption. While she had a fantastic personality, she did not get along with other cats and could not be adopted into a multi-cat household. This characteristic significantly limited her pool of potential adopters. The sponsored adoption fee was used to encourage potential adopters who could meet her needs to take her home. She found her forever home shortly after we applied the sponsorship.

Humane Society of Morgan County: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money from this grant was used to help three dogs: Bridgette, Aiden and Rush. Rush had severe skin issues and the other two had dental work done on them.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This helped us to be able to treat these issues that needed to be taken care of so that they could be adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

Three

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rush came into us from Animal Control with very severe skin issues. The skin issues took several months for us to resolve. We had to change her diet several times and had to give her a bath every week. With the help of this grant we were able to find out the exact problem that she had. She was adopted by a great family on a farm for her to use all of her energy.