Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Humane Society of Warren County: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The Sponsor a Pet donations that are designated to the Humane Society of Warren County are deposited into the general fund, where we have the greatest need. The Sponsor a Pet funds go to assist our animal shelter in providing services to the designated pets.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These donations help to offset the cost of medications, vaccinations, basic veterinary care, behavior modification, boarding, nutrition, and kennel enrichment.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Through the Sponsor A Pet button, Chucky (first photo) was sponsored. Chucky was a highly adoptable chow mix who came to the shelter in poor condition, with a completely matted base of fur. Funds allowed us to get Chucky professionally groomed and to care for him during his stay in the shelter. Chucky was adopted by a wonderful family (second photo) once he was healed and healthy.

The Sponsor a Pet donations also helped us continue to care for Finn (third photo). Finn came to the Humane Society of Warren County as a feral dog. We have been working with him for two years on socialization to increase his adoptability. Finn is a sweet soul and we know the right family is out there and his time will come to find a forever home. Meet Finn: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36030291

Animal Care Centers of NYC: Play Yard Renovation Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC) is truly grateful for this generous grant from the Petfinder Foundation, which was used to install a roofing structure at ACC’s Brooklyn Care Center’s outdoor play area to facilitate dog play groups and dog-to-dog socialization. This roofing structure is essential for the comfort of our dogs. ACC runs playgroups daily to provide the best possible quality of life for the dogs in our care, but inclement weather such as rain and snow as well as the hot sun can remove some of the benefits that dogs receive from this lifesaving program. The newly installed roofing structure at our Brooklyn Care Center ensures the efficacy of daily playgroups in a healthy and stimulating environment for NYC’s shelter dogs by providing high-quality enrichment and valuable socialization, which reduces stress and illness and ultimately increases adoptions.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

ACC is one of the largest animal-welfare organizations in the country, taking in more than 35,000 animals annually. We are different from other rescue organizations because we never turn away any homeless, abandoned, injured or sick animal in need, including cats, dogs, rabbits, small mammals, reptiles, birds, farm animals and wildlife.

The generosity of the Petfinder Foundation has enabled us to achieve our goal of providing the tens of thousands of dogs we care for each year a healthy, positive environment with the greatest possible chance for placement. Each year, on average, our Brooklyn Care Center cares for more than 3,500 dogs. For years to come, each dog now entering the Brooklyn Care Center will benefit directly from this roofing structure.

How many pets did this grant help?

3,500 yearly

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Orchid, a 7-year-old mixed breed (first photo), was found abandoned and tied to a pole in Rockaway Beach, New York. She was then brought to ACC’s Brooklyn Care Center by a Good Samaritan. Orchid immediately became a staff and volunteer favorite, as she was so sweet and always wagging her tall! Overweight (yet that much more to love) at 78 lbs., Orchid would become very hot and winded during playgroup. Once the roofing structure was installed with the generosity of the Petfinder Foundation, she learned how to stay cool in the shade, which enabled her to spend more time out in playgroup, socializing with other dogs and letting her true personality shine. Orchid was placed with one of ACC’s dedicated New Hope rescue-group partners.

Chicago Animal Advocates: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We used the grant to help pay for a brain MRI and spinal tap on a medical-mystery dog in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We needed about $2,400 to do this procedure. We had spent so much on Bon Bon before this, trying to figure out what is going on. It had been draining our funds to help other animals in need. Each time we came up empty-handed with answers.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bon Bon came to us over a year ago as an owner surrender. We quickly noticed he was having weird health issues: constant regurgitation, permanently dilated eyes, and odd tremor episodes. Nothing we did gave us an explanation. Our next step to hopefully get answers was to perform an MRI and a spinal tap. This was extremely expensive and a risk, since it still might not give us an answer. This was a bittersweet feeling for us. His MRI and spinal-tap results came back clean. The good news is, there is no cancer or neurological problem causing his issues. This gives us a good feeling that Bon Bon should have normal lifespan. Yet, we still wish we knew why this was happening and how to help stop it. Our vet thinks this is how he was born. We are now working on getting a Bailey Chair for him to help with the regurgitation. Overall, we are happy to know there isn't something major causing his problems and that he can live a long, happy life. Now we are focusing on finding him the right home to care for his needs. He is truly a happy, sweet dog. Meet Bon Bon: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37704657

Paws for Life Utah: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay medical bills for an injured kitty, Frankie (aka Frankenstein), who, sadly, crawled under a car hood to keep warm and, when the driver started the car in the morning, poor Frankie was caught. He suffered several injuries and a broken leg. After spending several months at our veterinary clinic (where he became a celebrity!), he was adopted by a loving woman and her sweet dog, and the three of them are now inseparable. He has had several surgeries, and the bills that are attached to this report represent a portion of his medical costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us immensely in paying a portion of the medical bills for Frankie. The community is responding so positively to the support from the Petfinder Foundation, as they have been following his story. He is one amazing and loving cat! This grant helped us not only with this one kitty, but in communicating the mission of our volunteer-based organization and highlighting the type of live-saving work we do with the support of the Petfinder Foundation. They are more aware of the needs of homeless pets and how to find them on Petfinder.com.

How many pets did this grant help?

One directly, but many more pets in good will

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A big THANK YOU to the Petfinder Foundation for granting us $1,000 for emergency medical funding for Frankie, the poor kitty who crawled under the hood of a car to keep warm and was terribly injured. The owner of the car had no idea that a sweet little gray-and-white kitten was under the hood of his car when he started it. Sadly, much of the kitten's skin was torn and his leg was broken. After several surgeries and several weeks of rehab, his fighting spirit got him through the recovery process. He is now in a loving home with his new mom and a loving dog brother who adores him!

Crossroads Animal Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

These funds were used to cover the medical expenses for Katie, an English sheepdog (first photo), who came to us in very poor condition (second photo). She had matted, dirty, maggot-infested fur that had to be shaved down (third photo); severe arthritis; and was so emaciated and weak, she could barely stand. Once we got her cleaned up, she was placed on arthritis meds and a special diet, which cost about $100 a month.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed CARE to continue supplying arthritis meds and specialty diets for Katie through Crossroads Animal Hospital.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Katie was a sweet girl who came to us in rough shape: She had matted, dirty, maggot-infested fur that had to be shaved down; severe arthritis; and was so emaciated and weak, she could barely stand. She made an awesome recovery thanks to our vet and Katie's foster home. However, this sweet girl was listed as special-needs due to her arthritis meds and special diet, which cost about $100 per month. She was very happy in her foster home, where she got along great with both kids and other animals. We needed donations of $100 per month to keep her in her current foster home long-term. Thanks to generous donations, Katie was able to stay in her foster home long-term.

Saving Grace Rescue, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Care for Astro, a kitten from a hoarder situation who had flea-powder toxicity that lead to seizures, permanent blindness and permanent ataxia. He was also severely anemic and malnourished, severely infested with fleas and earmites, and had an upper-respiratory infection.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to pay for his emergency care, continuing medical care, neurological consult and basic husbandry. Astro has made a near-full recovery aside from the blindness and an amusing wobble. He is a happy, loving and playful kitten who will go to his new home this weekend!

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Little Astro was rescued from a hoarding situation. He was found blind and infested with fleas. He was unable to find food in the stench and was losing weight and near death when we got him. Astro cannot see and needs a bit more time to learn to balance, but he is full of love and affection and some serious quirks. As soon as he's picked up, he goes limp in your arms. His eyes look healthy, but he is completely non-visual. Astro had two seizures in the first few weeks, but things quickly improved after he moved into his foster home.

After a much-needed flea bath, little Astro revealed his unique "abilities." Josh Norem, Astro's foster dad, combed out an insane amount of fleas. The little tabby was so grateful for the relief that he curled up in his lap, switched on his purr motor, and started catching invisible bugs in the air.

He has come far and is doing much better. He leaps around playfully every morning and is loving his new life with comfort, food and care. After getting up on the couch through the stairs, he wedges his legs snugly between the couch and the stairs just the way he likes it. Astro may be a bit trembly, but he wants his humans to know that he's just as purrfect as any other kitty with all the joy and love he can offer.

UPDATE May 21, 2017: It's been a long journey of healing. Astro was very fortunate to have an amazing foster home. Here he is going to his new home (last photo)!

Fayetteville Animal Protection Society: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

A cocker spaniel named Sadie's double total ear-canal ablation surgery

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

When owners don't seek veterinary care for ear infections (especially with spaniels), the ears can become permanently damaged. It's extremely painful for the dog and requires an expensive and intense surgery to remove the infected ear canals.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Sadie

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

At only 5 years old, little Sadie knew nothing but neglect. Someone likely bought her as a cute puppy and had not done any research on the needs of cocker spaniels, judging by the condition of her ears. Sadie’s owners were moving to Germany and instead of the life she had known with her family, she was dumped at Cumberland County Animal Control (a local [open-admission] shelter), not knowing where she was or what she did wrong. We had saved her on April 18, 2017, and discovered shortly afterward that her ears caused her an immense amount of pain. Poor Sadie needed a total ear-canal ablation (TECA) in both ears. When owners don't seek veterinary care for ear infections (especially with spaniels), the ears can become permanently damaged. It's extremely painful for the dog and requires an expensive and intense surgery to remove the infected ear canals.

One issue with our being a private, nonprofit, no-kill animal shelter is that we receive no government or state funding, but we couldn’t turn away poor Sadie. Even with the daily pain she was suffering, she is a sweet, affectionate pup who wants nothing more than to cuddle in your lap. The Petfinder Foundation stepped in and through their Emergency Medical Grant and support from our community, Sadie received the surgery she so desperately needed and deserved. We are so proud to say that she now is in her forever home, never having to wonder again if she’s loved.

HALO Animal Rescue: Petfinder 20th Anniversary Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Treating one of our cats, Enoki, at the vet for pancreatitis, irritable bowl syndrome and giardia.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Enoki came to us with several medical problems and this money really helped us recoup some of the funds spent on him.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Hi, my name is Enoki and I'm 10 years old. I'm a special-needs kitty with a great personality. I was in HALO's care for seven months before finding my forever home. The staff at HALO really got to know and love me. I am curious, attentive, friendly and a loving, young-at-heart girl. I always seek people out for lots of love and am super social. I love window seats, being pet and brushed and I do tolerate baths. I am going to need to be on a special diet and may need to have regular vet visits, it turns out. While I was in HALO's care, they found out I have pancreatitis and IBS. They also treated me for giardia. The people at HALO have been really wonderful and I felt like their own. I have since found a loving forever parent to help me with my needs. I am really happy.

Hendricks County Humane Society (HCHS): Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To provide hands-on cat care workshops called Reading to the Cats for young people, intermediate through early high school (second photo), and to save the life of a dog who kept coming back to us by providing obedience training which made him no longer difficult-to-adopt.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped HCHS establish a reputation in the community for providing educational programming that helps young people to better understand animals and to recognize that having a pet brings with it the need to be responsible for the animal's complete care. The workshops helped socialize our adoptable cats and provided information to HCHS about which cats were good with children. This grant also helped us find a home for a dog who'd had two unsuccessful adoptions and each time he was returned, we were told that he was aggressive and too hyper.

How many pets did this grant help?

Many cats were helped because the children attending the workshop learned some things about their own personal cats as well as cats that they may have in the future. For example, they made scratching boards (third photo) and learned why cats need to scratch. They learned what is involved when a microchip is implanted in a pet and saw a microchip for the first time. In addition, the cats who were in our building at the time of the workshops benefited from the socialization they received from the children and their adopting families were provided bags, decorated by the children in the workshop, filled with cat information, toys, and treats (fourth photo).

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Until we had our workshop, we were pretty sure that a cat named Rinny was unsociable. She would hide in her condo and peak over the edge when someone came into the room but then she would hide her head again. On the night of our Reading to the Cats workshop, Rinny perked up at the sound of the children's voices as they entered the room. She even came halfway down her condo and allowed herself to be petted (first photo). This action helped us to market Rinny as good with children. Meet Rinny: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37801744

Also, Zeus, a rottweiler/Lab (fifth photo), was adopted two times and returned both times. He was reported to be an "out-of-control dog" and "aggressive" because he jumped up on people and growled in their faces. Through our Petfinder posting, a lady contacted us and was considering adopting Zeus but was worried about his bad behavior. HCHS felt that Zeus needed obedience training and the lady agreed to a cooperative effort wherein she would take Zeus to obedience classes (sixth photo) and HCHS would pay the class fees. Before the classes concluded, the lady adopted him! She learned that if she provided Zeus with structure and firm guidance on how to behave, he was a wonderful pet. Now, finally, Zeus had a forever home.

We are grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for helping us to help animals. Lives were saved through the use of grant money.

St. Mary's Animal Welfare League: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Sampson had several teeth that were impacted that needed to be removed. Sampson was difficult to anesthetize because he suffered from a thoracic hernia when he was first brought into SMAWL. The estimate for Sampson's dental surgery and treatment plan was between $1,231-1,354. The actual cost of the surgery was $1,164. The grant money provided to SMAWL was incredibly helpful and covered almost 100% of that bill.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

SMAWL budgets yearly for emergency procedures such as Sampson's. Paying the full bill for Sampson's surgery would have taken a large chunk from that budget and taken away from other cats that we could help in this year. However, because of the grant provided, SMAWL will be able to maintain our intake goals and help as many -- or more -- cats than we had budgeted for.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

My name is Sampson and I have super powers. I came from a hoarding situation with dozens of other cats until Animal Control rounded all of us up and took us away. The nice people from SMAWL chose me and some of my friends to go live at the Cat Castle. I was very skinny and I was hungry all the time but I didn’t gain weight. I went to live with a foster mom who tried to fatten me up but she noticed that I breathed really hard and after eating I often threw up. When I went to the vet for a check-up, she couldn’t hear my heart on one side. Everyone was pretty scared about that and took me to another vet for x-rays. The x-rays showed that most of my organs were in the chest cavity. My heart and lungs were on one side and my liver, spleen, stomach and some other stuff were on the other side. I was probably born with a thoracic hernia and when I was really little, my organs moved up into my chest. They stayed there and didn’t have enough room to grow normally. I was hungry all the time because there was not enough room for my stomach to get full. I couldn’t breathe right because my lungs didn’t have enough room to expand. I needed expensive surgery to fix the hernia and put everything back where it belonged.

While SMAWL looked for a way to pay for this, I started to feel much worse. I was at the hospital for evaluation when one of my lungs collapsed and I went into emergency surgery. The surgeon worked very hard to fix me. I had some tough times, but with my new foster mom, I gained weight – almost 5 lbs. – and got stronger. I had lots of tests and most of my troubles resolved over time and with medication. They tell me my liver enzymes are high, but nothing slows me down.

I’m happy, playful, loving and feeling fine. I love to play and sleep in the sun and I really love my food, but mom and my doctor say I need to be on maintenance now that I am at a healthy weight. I like to play chase and I especially love squeaky toys. I have a foster brother and we play chase every day. I take three medications every day – one pill and two liquids. I’m not really happy about that, but I mostly take my medicine well. I need to have bloodwork every six months.

I would really love a forever family. My medicine costs about $70 per month. I eat dry food and two small cans of food every day. Sometimes I eat some treats. I like tomatoes and buttered toast as special treats when mom isn’t looking.

Sampson has been with SMAWL for just over two years now. His foster mom loves him very much, but would love to see him in his own home. Meet Sampson: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34548047