Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

The Washington County Humane Society: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Medical bills for Grace, a pit bull mix who was hit by what we believe to have been a snow plow.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Grace's bills topped out at almost $4,000. The $1,000 that we received paid for a portion of her surgery to have her eye removed.

How many pets did this grant help?

Just one - this was specifically for Grace

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

It was a cold winter Wisconsin day when a woman came into the shelter telling us of a dog in her car who had been hit by a truck or car. We assume it was a snow plow because of the hole that had penetrated her head. The dog was covered in blood, but her tail never stopped wagging! We couldn't see much physical damage to her but knew her injuries were severe. She had major road rash on her legs, hypothermia had set in (she had been nearly frozen to the ground) and she had a perfectly round hole near her eye. Her poor head and eyes were swollen, but all she wanted to do was give kisses and be next to you. We struggled to get her to relax as we tied her to a dog bed and drove her to the emergency vet. Grace received lifesaving treatments there, but it was going to be touch-and-go for the first 36 hours. She pulled through and proved just how strong her will to survive was.

After she'd had some time to heal, we could tell something further was wrong with her eye: It was cloudy and not moving as it should. Grace was losing sight in her eye due to the muscular damage and it would be in her best interest to remove the eye. Grace was adopted the day after she was on her adoption floor and even has her own Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Gracee-Pryor/1414679835505527). Every time we look at her photos, we realize this is why we do what we do: We are truly the voice of the animals!

Richardson Rescue : Disaster
What was the money or product used for?

In the middle of the night on Feb. 18, 2015, several buildings at Richardson Rescue, including the rescue office, laundry room and storage building, were engulfed in flames. Sixteen animals were killed.

After the devastation of the fire, we were able to rent and have delivered a temporary office trailer so that we could continue to rescue and adopt while we rebuild. The grant also enabled us to repair and replace destroyed kennels, tarps and shelter frames. We were also able to purchase a large storage building. There was also a pit bull badly burned by the fire, and she spent two weeks at the veterinarian's office. The grant helped cover this bill, and she is now doing well in a happy, loving home. We had also rescued an abused poodle whom we had just removed from the office the night before the fire. She had rubber bands wrapped around each leg, which caused a terrible bone infection in her right leg. The grant enabled us to have x-rays and treat this sweetie for one month for the infection. We were also able to purchase vaccines and tests that were destroyed in the fire.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to make repairs and get equipment to clear away the rubble left by the fire. We were able to continue our lifesaving work almost without any interruption. We treated two very needy dogs and kept our remaining pets as healthy and happy as possible during the crisis using the much-needed funds this grant provided.

How many pets did this grant help?

In addition to the two already mentioned, the grant helped us to continue to care for the 75 other pets in our care.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sweet P is a beautiful, sweet pit bull who suffered from a severe case of Demodex. On the morning of the fire at our rescue, she received second- and third-degree burns over most of her body. She stayed at the vet's office for two weeks to receive daily cleaning and treatment of her burns. When she returned to us, we had a couple visit with their rescue dog previously adopted from Richardson. It was love at first sight. Sweet P now lives in a home filled with love and kindness. She is completely healed and her hair is growing back beautifully. She is the first two pictures.

We also rescued a poodle who was horribly matted, with rubber bands wrapped around both front legs. She actually had dents in the bones of her right leg. It was determined she had a bone infection in her right leg. She was treated for one month for this condition and made a full recovery. She now has a loving and happy home. She is the last two pictures.

Center Valley Animal Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was requested for the purpose of restoring and expanding the current dog exercise and training yard. Due to other construction needs at the ranch, the dog yard had been shortened by more than half. CVAR used the Petfinder Foundation grant money to tear down some of the previous construction and then to put up new chain-link fence panels and two gates. The money still remaining will be used to create a passageway to the yard for one of the dog rooms.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Many of the dogs who come to CVAR have behavioral issues due to lack of training, abuse, neglect or just high energy. To help the dogs become more adoptable, CVAR provides daily exercisers, training and socialization with humans. CVAR was able to bring in a professional dog trainer on at least two recent occasions to help the volunteers learn how to approach highly anxious or badly behaved dogs to walk, exercise and train so that they can find suitable forever homes. The use of a large dog yard is crucial to this and to continuing training.

How many pets did this grant help?

17 dogs so far. There will be countless future dogs whom this grant will help.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kiego is a high-energy coonhound/Lab mix. He came to CVAR from Thurston County, WA, where he was picked as a stray who had been in numerous fights. He came with bite wounds and an aggressive attitude toward other dogs and CVAR's farm animals. On daily walks, Kieko would lunge at other dogs and other animals and, given his high energy and strength, some volunteers could not handle him. CVAR brought in a professional dog trainer who worked with Kieko and the volunteers at the shelter and quickly showed us all how to train him not to lunge at other animals. The training took place in and near the expanded dog yard.

Kieko has now found a new home with one of CVAR's volunteers and continues to benefit from the training and socialization. He now exhibits more gentle behavior. Kieko always had a gentle nature about him, but his previous neglect and fights and made him wary of other animals and dogs. Time at CVAR and the training there helped him find his new, loving forever home.

The first photo is Kieko with his new mom; the second is him with dog trainer Tiffany. The third photo is Kieko in the old dog yard; the fourth is the new, expanded dog yard.

Michiana Humane Society & SPCA: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used for our Spay-Neuter Initiative, whereby 100% of dogs and cats adopted from the shelter are spayed or neutered before leaving. This program encourages people to adopt because they will not have the added expense of the surgery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our shelter is located in a community with many working-class people who watch their pennies. They may be able to provide basic care for a pet, but often the additional $50-$200 cost of a spay or neuter surgery means they cannot choose the pet they want. But our area also has a large overpopulation of unwanted animals. By guaranteeing that the surgery will be taken care of at no additional cost to the adopters, we make our dogs a better value!

How many pets did this grant help?

During the two months since we received the Orvis Operational Grant, we adopted out 44 dogs, 75% of whom needed spay or neuter surgery before leaving. The average cost of a dog surgery is running about $75, so the $1,000 grant helped get 13 dogs into new homes!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One specific example in a funny way is Ringo, the red Pit Bull. Ringo was surrendered to the shelter by a serial dog owner who once again found herself unable to afford her pets. At three years old, and as a Pit Bull, Ringo faced an extended stay waiting for people to adopt her. But her red coat made her unusual, and she loves people, so we sent her off to a local vet to be spayed. She came back to the shelter the next day, and a few days later we got a visit from the veterinarian and her son! It turns out Dr. Puerling really liked Ringo and had decided that she would like to adopt her! Her son agreed, and then they brought their dog for a meet-and-greet. All went well and Ringo, now Red, went to a wonderful forever home!

If not for bringing her in to be spayed, Dr. Puerling would never have met Ringo and the match would not have happened!

Animal Protective Association of Missouri: Pet Transfer Program
What was the money or product used for?

This funding supported the APA's Pet Transfer Program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This funding paid for program supplies, medication, utilities and staff salaries for the animals in the Pet Transfer Program.

How many pets did this grant help?

34 dogs

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Not perfect, but perfect for them: When Eddie arrived at the APA in December 2014, he was coming from a rural area where he had not learned a lot about city living. Because he had never been housetrained, and because he was not neutered, Eddie marked. And marked. Everywhere he went, Eddie left his signature. This, obviously, wasn’t the most desirable trait to see in a potential housemate. So, as with all our animals, we neutered Eddie and started working on housetraining. Eddie also hadn’t mastered a lot of basic pet skills in his life -- he jumped on people and pulled on his leash -- so we entered him into our PRAISE dog training program, where he did great and learned several basic commands, attention lessons, and how to just be a mellower dog around people.

Although it took a lot of time and love, our dedicated dog walkers provided Eddie both those things in abundance. They came in several days a week to work with Eddie, socialize him, and help him learn. It wasn’t a quick process, but it turned out to be just what he needed. Eddie’s energy levels became more regular, he learned how to walk more calmly on a leash, and he followed the “four on the floor” rule for dog paws.

One day in May, a man came in just to look around at dogs. He wasn’t sure what he was looking for, and he wasn’t planning to adopt anyone that day. We’re always happy to see people taking their time to carefully consider their new pets, so we encouraged him to browse as long as he liked. He left that day and came by again soon after, again just to look. About a week later, he was back, this time with his son, a young man who was very excited to meet a potential new pet. They visited with several dogs before asking to see Eddie. When Eddie came in the room he happily sniffed around for a minute before proceeding right over to the man’s leg and greeting him, Eddie-style. Needless to say, it wasn’t the best way to start a visit.

However, immediately after that misstep, Eddie walked straight over to his son and began showing him affection, licking him and having a great time being petted by him. The young man fell in love with the sweet, sleek black pup, but Eddie is a big responsibility, so the man and his son left to give some thought to the dogs they had visited.

After considering the decision for a few days, the two came back for Eddie, arriving just before we closed at 5:00. The car had barely stopped when the son jumped out of it, rushing inside to pick up his new best friend. Eddie happily greeted his new family members and posed for his adoption photo. His new dad acknowledges that it might take some time for Eddie to become fully adjusted to home life, but they’re ready and happy to work with him because he’s already made himself at home in their hearts.

A Passion For Paws Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This money was used to purchase food and toys for dogs in our care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Many of our rescued dogs arrive malnourished. This grant provided food to get them back to full weight and strength. The toys provide social stimulation. These dogs stand a much higher chance of being adopted and successfully transitioning into a new family.

How many pets did this grant help?

25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Akira is a large young female Akita. She arrived at our Akita Ranch underweight and with dermatitis. Some vet treatment and proper food has brought her weight up and her coat is beginning to heal. Through it all she has been upbeat and joyful, and happy just to have a place to safely run around.

Noah's Animal Refuge Centre: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Noah's Animal Refuge rescued a beautiful little German shorthaired pointer pup who was found on the side of the road. He was emaciated, had demodex mange, eye infections, and a hernia. His vet bill was $404 to get him back to health and ready for adoption. We also have a rescue horse who needed help; her bill was $140. We also purchased a retractable sign for $135 in order to bring attention to our animals at adoption events, 2,000 nice tri-fold brochures for $265 that tell our story, business cards, magnets and a banner for $70.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation's Orvis Operation Grant, we were able to help the animals in our care in multiple ways.

A good Samaritan found a poor 6-month-old German shorthaired pointer-mix pup on the side of the road. We named him Toby. This baby was very sick, had mange, eye infections, and a hernia. With your help, we were able to get him the care he needed He is now a happy, healthy boy, and is ready for adoption!

We also rescued a very emaciated horse named Darby. Your funding helped us pay for her testing and care to get her back on track. Luckily, Darby's tests were all great and she is now in foster care living on 20 acres of beautiful grassland, and is fattened up and living a happy, healthy life.

By assisting us to purchase some of our promotional materials, it will allow us to get the word out about Noah's Animal Refuge and promote our facility, thus assisting us in adopting more animals. THANK YOU!!

How many pets did this grant help?

Countless!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A cry for help came across our page for a poor sick baby who was found on the side of the road. Toby had been severely neglected and had multiple health issues. We agreed to take him in without a second thought, and soon found out how much care he would need. He spent several days at the vet's office, needing multiple medications for eye infections, skin infections and, when he was healthy enough, neutering and hernia surgery. Toby is so thankful and is now happy and healthy waiting for his forever home.

Meet Toby: https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/32240792/

Pibbles & More Animal Rescue Inc.: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Benny's vet care

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Benny was very sick when he arrived to his foster home; read his full story below.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

How you doin'? My name is Benny, but my foster mom and dad called me Benny the Brindle and they saw my natural tendencies towards leadership and dubbed me the mayor of my neighborhood. When I arrived at my foster house, I was not feeling 100%. My lungs were not filling with air like they should and this left me out of breath and gasping at times. Not very good for a mayor to not be breathing right when he visits his constituents. I also was having some hip issues; I couldn’t make it up the steps and I would fall, needing help to get up. It was not the finest of scenarios for a gentleman like myself to end up in, but being Benny the Brindle, I had to protect my rep.

The Mayor’s Alliance for NYC's Animals let me hitch a ride with them down to the suburbs of Philadelphia. Now, being a NY boy at heart, I wasn’t so sure about this Philadelphia, but hey, I figured I would give it a try. I got out of the van and as you can see, I was quite pleased with my surroundings.

I settled into my humble abode quickly, but my health was not being cooperative. I was coughing, and even getting across the yard into my new “apartment” in my foster house became quite difficult for me. After watching me overnight, my foster parents rushed me to the vet the next morning because my cough was non-stop and my breathing was really labored. So we went to see my now very good friend Dr. Patten at Liberty Vet Clinic.

This was not one of my more memorable fun times. They had to check my lungs and get some kind of a culture to try and figure out what was going on. I was under the weather and I had my mayoral duties to attend too. We went back with some medications to my foster home and I still was not getting back to my old self. In fact, things were getting worse. I couldn’t even get up the next morning, and breathing was becoming nearly impossible. Foster Mom rushed me to the veterinary hospital, where I was quickly put into the ICU and on oxygen.

I certainly gave my foster parents a scare a few times when things were not going so well. I had a terrible case of pneumonia on top of kennel cough and a bacterial infection. I had to spend a week in the ICU with the good doctors watching over me all the time. They knew they had to get Benny the Brindle back to his job of charming all those he meets. After all, that is what a mayor does, is it not?

After I got home, I was told to rest. How can Benny the Brindle rest when he is finally starting to feel like his old self, I ask you?! I gave my foster family a run for their money, literally. After a day or so of recuperation, I thought it would be a good idea to, well, ya know, take off across the yard and run. I thought my foster mom was going into cardiac arrest when she saw me do it. In fact, I think she did. But, I knew I was on the mend and I was ready to get back to my job of making people happy.

After about three more weeks, I was fit as a fiddle! I got to go see Dr. Patten and get more X-rays to check my lungs and it was GREAT NEWS!! Dr. Patten said that I had the lungs of a 2-year-old and I was ready to go to live with my forever family!

My family drove all the way down from my hometown of NYC and took me back to be part of their family. I have settled in nicely. I can do steps, and take long walks and visit the lakes and parks and greet all those from my neighborhood sharing my story. Benny the Brindle just needed a shot, ‘cuz he may be 15, but he’s got some NY fight in him. I mean, look at how handsome I am … 15 never looked so good, baby!!!

And now, because a few people from Pibbles & More Animal Rescue (PMAR) believed in me and my fight and my will to live, I lived happily ever after …

One Love Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to care for our dog Grace. She arrived to our rescue on transport with a clear case of carpal hyperextension.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

With this grant, we were able to get Grace pet physical therapy for her legs. We would have struggled financially with her medical expenses without the help of the Petfinder Foundation.

How many pets did this grant help?

One, Grace.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Grace came to One Love in early February 2015. When she arrived off the transport caravan, we could tell immediately that she had a big problem with her legs. Her wrists were collapsed from the normal upright position, making her paws look long and flat. This type of deformity is called carpal hyperextension, and it’s caused by poor nutrition during some critical growth periods.

Grace was taken to the vet immediately. They discussed splinting her legs at a future appointment. Grace went back to her foster home to rest and recuperate. She was put on the same five-star food that all of our foster pets receive. Amazingly, after just over a week of good nutrition, Grace’s leg deformity began to correct itself! The power of good food should never be underestimated! It was later decided that splints were not needed, but Grace should see a specialist.

Besides the issues with the front legs, the hind legs were also challenged and Grace continued to have mobility issues. On the advice of our vet, we took Grace to Pet Physical Therapy (Pet PT) to work on both her front and hind legs. Building strength now was preferred to splinting since she had already come so far with the food and activity.

Dr. Russell Howe-Smith of Pet PT saw our Princess Grace and determined that her overall joint laxity was secondary to poor nutrition and confinement/inactivity prior to rescue. He prescribed the use of the underwater treadmill to build strength and tighten tendons. Grace received this therapy twice a week for six weeks.

We are happy to report that Grace was released from Dr. Howe-Smith’s physical therapy after the six weeks were completed. Her prognosis: very good! Her muscle strength has improved dramatically. Her orders? Keep fit with straight-line walking and playing in the back yard. She doesn’t need any pain meds, either!

Grace is now healthy and active and about to be adopted shortly! We have included pictures of her with her forever family, and we couldn’t be more pleased with her terrific transformation.

Once again, we owe a big debt of gratitude to the Petfinder Foundation for providing us with a $1,000 emergency medical grant to help Grace recover. This kind of help is critical to the work of rescue and allowed us to give this sweetheart the best care possible.

H.O.P.E. Safehouse Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The $90 we received through the Sponsor A Pet program went to pay off medical bills for Stuffing (a canine).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

HOPE’s biggest expense is medical bills, as we take in animals who have curable illnesses but may be euthanized at their current facility because of the expense or time required to care for the animal. Any donation to help with our medical bills helps us rescue more animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

HOPE Safehouse went to an animal transport location where we had agreed to take a few dogs and cats. Stuffing, a Rottweiler and Shepard mix, was not one of our agreed-upon animals, but none of the other rescues wanted her because she looked old, so HOPE took her. After Stuffing was taken to our veterinary clinic, it was determined that she was six years old, tested positive for heartworm, had nub teeth from eating rocks and garbage and had tin foil in her stomach.

We gave Stuffing all the necessary medical care she needed before and during her stay in a foster home. The local newspaper ran a story about Stuffing on Dec. 24, 2014, and she had an accepted adoption application on Dec. 26. Stuffing’s story is what HOPE is all about.