Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Noah's Ark Animal Rescue dba Meowness Cat Adoptions: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Spay/shots/testing for Josie (a homeless cat) to prepare her for adoption.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Provided financial means to rescue a homeless cat and provide needed veterinary services.

How many pets did this grant help?

One.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Josie was rescued from homelessness after her former owner was evicted from his home in Phoenix, Arizona. The sheriff changed the locks and the cats escaped through a broken window. Josie was adopted in November of 2017 and lives with a longtime cat lover and a big kitty sister.

Paws for Life Utah: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

We used the P.L.A.Y. pet beds for our shelter pets, and those in our boarding facility, as well as those in foster care. We are still using all of them -- they are so durable through the wash!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It allowed us to give the shelter pets a warm bed to sleep in rather than a cold shelter floor.

How many pets did this grant help?

30

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

These adorable Pomeranian puppies were two of more than 160 that were rescued from a hoarding situation in Las Vegas. We transported a total of 17 Pomeranians to Paws for Life Utah and found every one of them a loving home. These two puppies needed medical care, and we were grateful that they had time to rest and relax on a P.L.A.Y. pet bed. The second picture is that of Lucy, a 12-year-old Chihuahua mix whom we rescued from an [open-admission] shelter in Los Angeles county. She needed medical care (surgery for a bilateral hernia and to remove several mammary tumors) and rested comfortably throughout her recovery on a P.L.A.Y. pet bed.

Gateway Pet Guardians: P.L.A.Y. Pet Beds
What was the money or product used for?

These P.L.A.Y. beds were used to enrich the lives of the pets in our emergency shelter and in foster homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The beds were a hit with all who tried them. They were durable and washed well. We had several foster families say the existing pet in the home wanted it for themselves.

How many pets did this grant help?

15

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cozumel is one happy recipient. His foster mom sent his bed with him when he was adopted. Here he is enjoying a "Chill" moment!

Calvin's Paws: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for cold laser therapy, surgery and vet care for a facial debriding wound on a feline. The wound covered half of the cat's face and eyelids, back to his ear and down to the base of his neck. He receives daily wound cleaning, dressing, sugar-and-honey packs and periodic sutures to help close the wound. Anticipated total time for recovery is 10-12 months.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This amazing community cat had sustained a wound (likely from a fight) which turned into an abscess and burst, leaving half of his face an open wound, exposed down to the muscle and tendon, with no eyelids and no skin from his ear to his eye and down to his neck. This cat had been walking around like this for almost two years. He presented at our clinic in a carrier, purring and rubbing both sides of his face on anyone that would give him attention. Clearly this boy wanted to live and we wanted to help him -- and our vet was completely committed to helping. Luckily the Petfinder Foundation was willing to help us finance the care that this boy needed to have his own miracle and get on the path to recovery.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Several years ago, someone left this gorgeous Maine coon boy to try and survive on his own. Some kind folks in the neighborhood started feeding him and trying to earn his trust, but two years ago, Elvis sustained a wound on his face from a cat fight. That wound turned into an abscess and burst. The kind folks feeding him sought help, but no one would help them – offering only vague estimates of $1,000 to fix him, or to euthanize him. Eventually, his people found us, and he came in for a community-cat spay day this weekend. As soon as we met him, Elvis rubbed his face from one side to the other on the volunteer’s hand and he purred. (Also, for those wondering – yes, we were more than a little wigged out when he rubbed his gaping wound on our hands!) He was not acting painful or scared, despite the fact that half of his face and his eye were one huge open wound.

Our vet set a plan to do a cleaning, then begin getting the tissue healthy, debriding, doing sugar-and-honey packs and cold-laser therapy while she worked on closing the wound in tiny increments to avoid starting back with another abscess. The finders named this boy Elvis and he has become the rock star cat in our rescue. Everyone loves him and he walks around the vet's office like it is his own personal Graceland. A huge male cat named Hatteras is also at the vet's office awaiting his forever home. He has become Elvis's bodyguard and requires pets before he lets anyone near his pal. They are now celebrities and are even making a guest appearance at the Sip and Shop event at the Purr and Bark/Woofinwaggle event this weekend. Getting Elvis back to his perfectly handsome self is slow going, but he is a super happy cat and happy to be alive. The Petfinder Foundation's grant helped us to be able to save a wonderful cat who had been turned away and discarded by person after person for many years. Elvis is forever grateful, as are we and his entire fan club.

St. Francis Society Animal Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 Emergency Medical Grant was used to help Norman, a critical-care feline.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant was used to help offset the more than $10,000 in veterinary bills we accrued for Norman's care.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Norman is a 2-year-old domestic shorthair cat. He was brought to our county animal shelter by a good Samaritan who found him lying in the middle of a main highway, having been hit by a car. Norman was saved from euthanasia by a local animal lover, George. George brought Norman to a private veterinarian, who diagnosed him with bilateral luxating patellas. As if that wasn't terrible enough, Norman contracted a severe upper-respiratory infection that quickly overtook his body. Unable to afford the proper care for Norman, George surrendered him to St. Francis Society. Norman needed 24-hour critical care at a veterinary specialist (Blue Pearl) as he fought the infection in his body. In addition to the infection, he was also suffering from a critical electrolyte and sodium imbalance and had to be in an incubator, as his body was unable to maintain its temperature. He had a feeding tube as he was unable to eat on his own.

Today, our special cat, Norman, continues to progress in his journey to recovery. Several weeks ago, he was released from his specialists at Blue Pearl and also VCA Carrollwood Cats after treatment for the condition that nearly took his life. All of his medical professionals attest that Norman truly is a “miracle cat” in that there was very little hope early on that he would make it through the severe URI that compromised his entire immune system. But with the extensive medical care and love he received from his St Francis foster family, Norman flourished, and is now nearing the time when we will be able to have his luxating hip injury corrected. Following his FHO (femoral head ostectomy) surgery, he will undergo rehabilitation for a period of 6-8 weeks. After this period, we are very hopeful that Norman’s mobility will be much improved and a forever home can be found for him.

Paws Ranch Rescue & Animal Sanctuary: Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Tuition for DPFL Mentorship at Austin Pets Alive! from April 10-13, 2018

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We learned valuable skills and now run daily playgroups. Each dog gets out of their kennel every day and engaged with other dogs. This is very beneficial, both physically and socially.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far this grant has helped all 30 of the pets currently at our shelter.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Star came to our rescue as a 12-week-old pup. She was passed over initially due to the high number of purebred Lab puppies we had available at the time. While staying at the shelter for six months, her social skills suffered and she became barrier-reactive. While we were still at the mentorship, we began to asses Star for playgroup. Once back in San Antonio, we let her play with other dogs her size and energy level. A few days later, a couple came to see Star. They were so impressed with her social skills that they adopted her right away. She is very happy at her new home, actively engaging in appropriate play.

Compassion For Cats of New London County Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

For food and litter for Aslan

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped pay for a small amount of food and litter.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This $25 grant was for Aslan from someone who would liked to have adopted him but couldn't, so she gave money to help out until he went to his new home, which he did. From his Petfinder profile: "Aslan is an orange-and-white Maine coon/tabby mix. He is feline-AIDS-, leukemia-, and heartworm-negative, neutered and up-to-date on shots. Aslan is a big boy, very easygoing, handsome, friendly, affectionate, playful and sweet. He loves everyone, and doesn’t even mind being held! He gets along very well with people, cats, and nice, gentle children."

Central New York Cat Coalition, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Spay/neuter

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped to pay for a cat to be spayed/neutered so it could be adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A donor sponsored a special-needs cat we had for adoption who was later adopted by someone who saw her on Petfinder. This grant was used to pay for the spay/neuter of another animal who was able to be saved since she was adopted. The sponsored cat was Misty. From her Petfinder profile: "Hi, I'm Misty! It's hard being a black cat, as not many people look at us. It's even worse being a black cat with a food allergy. That's my dilemma!

"I was abandoned in the freezing winter and trying to stay alive under a shed until I trusted my rescuer. Pictures don't do me justice, as I am stunning in person! I have shiny, soft, thick black fur with the most gorgeous emerald eyes. I am looking for a quiet home with someone who has a sunny window to sit in and would love to have me sit next to them on the couch stroking the softest fur you will ever touch! I'm a pro at using my scratching post and not furniture. I also have good litterbox manners. I am looking for a special adopter who will feed me my Hill's Digestive I/d. As long as I am on this food, I am happy and healthy. I am a princess and would love to be your one and only pet. I would love to meet you!"

St. Animal Pet Adoptions: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

This money was used to pay a large medical bill for one of our cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We rely on donations and adoption fees to cover our medical, housing and food bills. Grant money is always appreciated to help with these costs.

How many pets did this grant help?

This helped one pet.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

On Jan. 2, 2018, we received Chino, a yellow-and-white domestic shorthair cat. Both of his back legs were broken. The rescue that found him didn't have the means to care for him and asked if we would take him. We did, and took him to our regular vet, who said we needed to take him to a vet who could handle his severe injuries. The left leg had a dislocated femur and the other leg had been fractured in two places. The plan was to amputate the leg with the two fractures. Chino had surgery on the dislocated femur. This was successful, but while the left was healing, the right leg with the two fractures also healed. When he went back to the vet after six weeks, the vet was in awe that he could walk on both legs! Chino has gotten better and better and is being adopted. After all he has been through, he is a very loving cat. I will miss him.

Flock Together Bird Rescue, Inc.: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used mainly for Boots, our Congo African Grey who has no feet. We bought her several toys and some Nutri-Berries and Avi-Cakes, which are her favorite treats and which she shared with all the other birds.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

It helped provide toys and treats for all the birds, which they usually get only occasionally.

How many pets did this grant help?

59 exotic birds (parrots)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The main bird helped, and whom most people want to help the most, is Boots, our Congo African Grey with no feet. You can meet her at www.petfinder.com/petdetail, but she is not adoptable, as it states in her description. From her Petfinder profile: "Boots came to us about seven years ago in order to prolong her life. While she was in her nestbox, mice are believed to have got in and chewed off her feet. After about a year, the breeder couldn't keep her anymore because of the special care she requires.

"She lives in a special padded house, with padded perch platforms so she can climb up and sit. Even with all the precautions, she is still prone to bumping a 'nub' or getting a rubbing sore and bleeding. Just recently, our vet had to cauterize a spot she had injured.

"She is very special because she can not only talk clearly but can sound exactly like every sound she has ever heard!
She loves broccoli, carrots, and any type of bread or crackers. She plays with her toys and loves to chew holes in her bottom towels that have to be changed regularly!"