Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Laura's Hope Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

We added it to our medication fund.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We were able to purchase heartworm medication.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mocha required heartworm medication to continue her slow-kill treatment of heartworms. This grant gave us enough money to purchase the heartworm medication needed. From her Petfinder profile: "Mocha is a 4-year-old Lab blend, weighing about 40 lbs. She is fully vaccinated, altered, and microchipped. She was surrendered by her previous owners because they did not have the time for her. Mocha gets along great with other dogs and children, but absolutely NO CATS. Mocha really enjoys playing ball and will do it for hours as long as you keep throwing it! Mocha seems to have a little toy aggression when other dogs come near her toy, but is fine when people take it from her." Meet Mocha: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39965060/

Austin Pets Alive!: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds were used to help cover intake costs during the initial stages of Austin Pets Alive!’s Hurricane Harvey disaster response. Before the Category 4 storm made landfall, we began calling shelters in Harvey’s predicted path, anticipating that many of them would need to evacuate their animals to other facilities, or be forced to consider mass euthanasia rather than leave helpless pets in structures at risk of being flooded or destroyed. From Aug. 24-25, we transported 220 dogs and cats to safety in Austin from Houston’s BARC and Harris County shelters and the public shelters in Goliad, Aransas County, Aransas Pass, Weslaco, Alice and Edinburg. Each incoming pet had to be vaccinated, tested, microchipped, and given dewormer and flea/heartworm preventatives upon arrival before being placed in foster care or in one of our specialized shelter programs. We also treated any medical issues for those pets that arrived sick, injured or pregnant (of which there were many). Additionally, most of these animals required spay/neuter surgery, which we’ve also provided. This generous disaster grant from the Petfinder Foundation helped pay for intake costs and medical treatment for these 220 pets. For every pet rescued during our ongoing Hurricane Harvey disaster response, we’ve taken on any and all medical costs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Petfinder Foundation was one of the first organizations to offer emergency funding to Austin Pets Alive! during what has become one of the largest Hurricane Harvey responses mounted on behalf of dogs and cats. This grant directly benefited 220 pets rescued ahead of the hurricane by supporting necessary intake vetting. Indirectly, the promise of financial support from organizations like the Petfinder Foundation allowed Austin Pets Alive! to focus on saving as many pet lives as possible in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, no matter what it took. To date, we have given safe haven to more than 5,000 dogs and cats, including some 2,000 that came to our facility in Austin (compared to our normal annual intake of around 7,500), plus more than 3,000 pets that we’ve cared for in Houston (so far). We continue to operate a temporary emergency shelter in central Houston in partnership with Houston Pets Alive!, and have plans to support the city’s long-term recovery through 2018.

How many pets did this grant help?

220

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

As Austin Pets Alive! actively rescued dogs and cats to help shelters in Hurricane Harvey’s path clear their kennels ahead of the storm, dozens of orphaned kittens made their way to our facility in Austin, where they would not only be safe from the hurricane, but also receive round-the-clock care in our neonatal kitten nursery. Vinnie (first photo), a weeks-old kitten from BARC (Houston's city shelter), arrived at Austin Pets Alive! shortly before Hurricane Harvey made landfall, along with his four siblings: Versailles, Vermont, Vertigo and Venice.

No longer at risk of euthanasia or drowning during this disaster, these tiny, fragile kittens spent a couple of weeks in our kitten nursery being showered with love as they received specialized care, including bottle-feeding. Vinnie quickly won over staff and volunteers with his constant purring and cuddly nature, and when ready, he moved into a loving foster home with his siblings, where they continued to grow and thrive. Within a few weeks of being rescued, all five of these sweet kittens had found their forever homes. Shortly after his adoption, Vinnie’s new mom reported he was “blending in with his furry [adopted] siblings beautifully and as calmly as expected!”

Vinnie was among the first wave of 220 dogs and cats that Austin Pets Alive! rescued from shelters as they prepared to be hit by this devastating hurricane. This grant helped pay for necessary intake vetting for these 220 animals — including Vinnie and his two brothers and two sisters — which was critical to preventing the spread of disease in our shelter and the first step in preparing these “Harvey” pets for adoption. Austin Pets Alive! couldn’t be more grateful to the Petfinder Foundation for helping us make happy endings like this possible for shelter pets imperiled by Hurricane Harvey.

White County Animal Shelter: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

We have used $490 of the $1,000 grant solely for the spay/neuter of adopted dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped us get several dogs adopted and ensure that they were spayed/neutered before going home with their new families. It helped increase the adoption rate as it was an additional cost that the family did not have to cover to take their new family member home.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far we have spayed/neutered six dogs for their new families. We still have just over half the grant remaining and plan to use it for adopters to get their new family members spayed/neutered before taking them home.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A sweet dog who was found in the middle of the road by our shelter found her new family. A local resident saw her profile and knew she would be the perfect addition for her parents. Her parents had loved a senior Aussie her whole life, and when the family saw Taci, they knew it was meant to be. The parents lived out of state and the grant allowed us to save the family the cost of the spay surgery so they could arrange transportation and buy her all the comforts and prepare her new home.

Valley Animal Haven: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

We used the funds to purchase all-weather covers for our large exercise yard and both of our meet-and-greet yards. When we originally applied for the grant, we were quoted a price from a website that was recommended to us, but with the generous $2,900 grant, we began a much more extensive search in an attempt to make the money stretch as far as possible. We found a carport company that was able to cover all of our yards for $3,500. We financed the remaining amount that was needed for the projects and now we have beautiful covers on our meet-and-greet pens and our exercise yard.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These covers have already been a tremendous benefit to the animals at our facility. Our weekly training class is utilizing our exercise yard with our shelter dogs. This class was not possible until the cover was put up, as the trainers and dogs had to be out in the blistering heat or pouring rain. This grant helped us solve that problem. Now the dogs receive the training that they desperately need to make them more highly adoptable.

Our trainers are actually students from our local continuation high school. Our training program is curricular in nature, which means the students must have good school attendance and maintain a GPA of at least 2.0 to participate in our program. Our training program has given these students an incentive to stay in school and keep their grades up if they want to participate in our academy. We just completed our first 8-week training session and we are thrilled to say that we had six students fully complete the program, and two of them had perfect attendance.

The seemingly simple addition of a cover over our exercise yard had made an immeasurable difference in the lives of our dogs and has had a positive impact on the youth in our community. There are already 13 students registered to participate in our next training session (beginning Nov. 16, 2017).

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will potentially impact the lives of every dog that passes through our shelter. The covers over the exercise yard and meet-and-greet pens allow potential adopters to visit our adoptable pets in all types of weather. This one-on-one time between adopter and dog has resulted in fewer animals being returned to our shelter after adoption.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We recently took in a litter of six 6-month-old golden retriever/cattle dog mix puppies. These puppies were all lacking in social skills and had no leash experience. Our exercise yard was the perfect setting for our trainers to work with this litter of puppies. The puppies felt more at ease in the training since they were able to remain in close proximity to each other while still having enough room to move around and absorb their lessons. Our student trainers are really enjoying having a cover on this exercise yard, as they can now have cover from the sun and the rain to do their classes. The puppies quickly excelled in their training class and all but one have already found loving families. Their adopters were very impressed at the pups' skills. This was all directly attributable to the fact that our student trainers now have a proper place to conduct classes.

Cavalier Rescue of Florida, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant was used to pay for chemotherapy treatments for Honey, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel, who was rescued by Cavalier Rescue of Florida.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us the opportunity to provide Honey with lifesaving medical care to treat her cancer. As an all-volunteer rescue without support from endowments or tax dollars, we must fundraise to provide care to all of our rescues. With the support of the Petfinder Foundation, we were able to help Honey without delay.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Honey is an almost 9-year-old Cavalier King Charles spaniel who arrived in rescue from a breeder/hoarder situation having delivered multiple litters of puppies. Upon arrival she had a visible tumor that needed to be removed. The tumor was biopsied and she was diagnosed with a grade-3 mammary-gland adenocarcinoma. Through consultation with the oncologist, it was determined that chemotherapy would offer Honey's best chance at a long life without a recurrence of cancer. She would need between five and six treatments, delivered over a four to five months. She began her treatments in September 2017 and had her fourth treatment on Nov. 21, 2017. She is responding so well, so she will require only five total treatments. Honey will be available for adoption once she is given clearance from her doctor. We hope that by the New Year, Honey will be ready for a new forever family.

We greatly appreciate the support of the Petfinder Foundation, because the cost of Honey's overall medical care, from arrival to adoption, will exceed $5,000. This donation made it possible for us to provide her with the care she needed immediately. We were able to fundraise the rest while also providing care to the other Cavaliers in our care. Honey now has an excellent opportunity to live much longer, and we will make sure she is treated like a princess!

Athenspets, Inc.: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Kongs are used as mental enrichment for the dogs at Athens-Clarke County Animal Control (ACCAC).

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Through publicity, relationships with rescue organizations, and funding for medical and spay/neuter programs, Athenspets has reduced the euthanasia rate of dogs at ACCAC significantly in the past two years, but keeping the dogs mentally stable and engaged while at the shelter has increasingly become a problem as stay times have increased. The Kongs provided by the Petfinder Foundation provide the needed stimulation for the dogs by acting as a "puzzle" from which they need to extract moist food or peanut butter and a toy with an irregular shape which they must learn to control.

How many pets did this grant help?

At least the 36 who were at the shelter when the Kongs arrived, but they will continue to help newly impounded dogs, so the final number will be many times that.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A few of the dogs helped have been Didi, who has since been rescued; June (www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38595940); and Beauty (www.petfinder.com/petdetail/38749886). From June's Petfinder profile: "Mama June is still carrying milk. Hopefully, her puppies are safe, and she can put her puppy days behind her. It’s time for June to enjoy her youth -- she’s only a year old herself! She was happy to leave her kennel and have some time for attention and treats. I tossed a ball for her, and she watched it roll and looked at me with an expression that said, 'You’ve got to be kidding!' She’s still carrying quite a load of milk, but that will change and June will return to her pre-puppy figure. She’s actually a petite girl. June wasn’t too sure about dogs in the adjoining interaction pen and wasn’t comfortable with those who were boisterous, but she was better with those who were calm. One thing is for sure: June likes being with people and is happy for any love you give her!"

Humane Society of Manatee County: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The generous grant was used to replace a storage shed that was damaged by Hurricane Irma. Replacing this shed was critical to our organization because it was the only place we could store all of our lawn-maintenance and play-yard-maintenance equipment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant enabled us to replace a valuable storage unit which contained all items needed to care for the play yards and shelter property.

How many pets did this grant help?

70

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant was for a much-needed shed that was destroyed by Hurricane Irma. So all of our animals will benefit. Facebook caption for the photo: "Calla, Maximillion, Corn Cob (left to right) and the rest of our shelter pets wanted us to post this personal message thanking our thoughtful community for their outpouring of support during the Irma aftermath. We still do not have power and are so grateful to those who are doing our laundry in their homes and returning clean towels and blankets, walking dogs, cuddling our cats, fostering and donating a large variety of needed supplies. All of our shelter pets are safe and well cared for. We have installed temporary air conditioning units in the kennels being powered by a generator."

Humane Society of Western Montana: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant
What was the money or product used for?

This August we requested money to use for our Ken Shughart Junior Award winner to help honor and foster a connection with incredible young people in our community who have shown compassion for animals. As our Ken Shughart Award Banquet will happen in April 2018, we have not spent this grant money yet. Please consider this a preliminary report of what the money will be used for.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helps us to connect and honor young people in our community who show compassion toward animals. We focus on the human-animal bond at all ages. Our goal is to raise awareness about our shelter to younger people so that they can be involved in supporting our animals. In April 2018, we will be using this grant to honor our 2018 Ken Shughart Junior Award recipient. Several young people who have shown care for animals will be nominated and considered for this Junior Award. It's a wonderful opportunity to get more young people involved in our shelter to care for our animals!

How many pets did this grant help?

N/A

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This money is focused on helping young people in our community. Last year, the Ken Shughart Junior Award was given to Kathryn Donovan for her outstanding service to pets in our community. Kathryn is an 11-year-old who owns a business called Kaboba Designs. She hand-makes fun, braided dog toys. Ten percent of all of her sales are donated to the Humane Society of Western Montana. With this award, we have been able to foster a relationship with Kathryn that helps us to keep her connected to our shelter. We sell her toys in our re-Tail store, and she was a featured vendor at our One Stop Shop fundraiser. This year, and in years to come, we plan to continue connecting younger people to our shelter in many ways.

Cooper's Chance Animal Rescue: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant
What was the money or product used for?

To expand our Youth Humane Education Program to 50 low-income children.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our organization and animals were helped by the community connections we made through the education program, which also brought awareness to the plight of pit bulls, senior pets and dogs with special needs.

How many pets did this grant help?

10

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant directly impacted Rosey, a 1-year-old pit bull/boxer mix who was an animal ambassador to the youth at our camps. Rosey was rescued with severe Demodex mange and required several months of care before she was finally healed and ready for adoption. Although she was so neglected, she was always friendly and loved people. She was the perfect ambassador for her breed; she brought awareness, education and advocacy with lots of puppy kisses and tail-wags! Being able to attend the youth camps keeps her socialized, especially meeting children and experiencing new places, which helps her remain healthy and adoptable, and gives her more exposure to adoptive families. Meet Rosey: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39043866

Seattle Humane Society of King County: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We asked for the funds to help with our teen-education program. Many of the participants are in outlying areas of the county and can't easily get to our shelter, so we either travel to them, or provide transportation when we can. We have to pay to rent that transportation to bring the kids to the shelter so they can get the hands-on experience and learn within the shelter environment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant didn't directly help pets.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant wasn't meant to help our pets directly, but it certainly will have an effect down the road! Our teen-education program is important to so many kids each year. High-school students from all over the region participate. They have the chance to learn about animal-handling and training, and even get to interact with our vet services team. We want them to walk away with a sense of respect and empathy for animals, and for many, a strong interest in volunteering, being involved at the shelter or considering veterinary medicine for a career!