Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Leflore County Humane Society: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

We were able to use the money from the grant to do two heartworm treatments and one minor surgery, and to buy vaccines.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us to provide medical treatment to two animals to be able to get them healthy so they could be adopted.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Cotton came to us on Dec. 18, 2013. He was found in a ditch, cold, starved, matted and very sick. We immediately sent him to the vet. His ears were so full of hair and debris that he could not hear. He had feces stuck to his bottom and was so raw that he was bleeding. His hair was so matted that he had sores all over his little body. He was in such bad shape our vet did not think he would live for 3-4 more days. I took him home with me the week of Christmas so he could get a little extra TLC. He continued to visit the vet every two weeks to have his ears treated. He was heartworm positive, so we had him treated and neutered. After many baths, groomings and good food to eat, Cotton began to look more like he should and to feel better. He was adopted on Feb. 27, 2014!!! I have attached before and after pictures of Cotton to show you how he improved. We at LCHS would like to thank the people who voted for us and also the Petfinder Foundation for awarding this grant to us to enable us to provide all the care that our animals so greatly deserve.

Pack Ethic Rescue Inc. : Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

We used this $1,000 grant to help purchase a Walk In Barn for our rescue barn animals.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We rescued some barn animals that lost their homes due to a fire and with the help of this $1,000 grant we were able to purchase a Walk In Barn for them to use to have shelter from the elements of Upstate New York.

How many pets did this grant help?

5

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Living in the country means being surrounded by farms and the animals that live and work at them. There are thriving dairy farms full of Holstein and Jersey cows. There are fields of Angus cows bred and raised for beef. There are farms that raise hogs, goats and chickens. There are horse barns, whether for breeding or boarding. Every farm has a different story, a different objective, mission or aim. There are small hobby farms consisting of families or individuals with their small group of various farm animals. Whatever the case may be, just as with domesticated cats and dogs, these animals also sometimes need saving too. Pack Ethic was not going to stand by and NOT help when these creatures called out to us. Eric was raised on a farm and with his knowledge and our dedication to the health and comfort of any animal great or small, we knew that we could try and make our own little bit of difference here in this countryside.

THE COWS
Pack Ethic reached out to an individual who suffered a fire in their barn and was unable to rebuild. A group of cows came to call this place home. They were so young when they were removed from their mother and sold at auction that they were all lacking in health and immunity. They were still so young when they were displaced by the fire and needed lots of TLC and good food. Now these cows can look forward to safety and comfort forever. They will never have to worry about going hungry or going to slaughter. They are home sweet home!

Doberman Rescue of Nevada: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

To pay veterinary bills.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Paid veterinary bills.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Noah is a 3-year-old Doberman stray who was having a rough time. Animal control fished him out of an irrigation canal where he was struggling to stay afloat. The shelter was going to euthanize him because he had an upper respiratory infection – unless a rescue saved him. Doberman Rescue of Nevada treated his URI, had him neutered and started an aggressive course of nourishment to get some meat on his bones. We also noticed that he drooled a lot -- not typical for a Dobe. So our vet researched many possible causes and performed several medical tests to ensure that we were not overlooking any other ailments such as megaesophagus, lockjaw or immune-mediated encephalitis. Thankfully, we found no indication that he was suffering from any of these conditions, but we had to do these procedures to eliminate them as possibilities. Noah is a gentle, sweet boy who is aching for a forever home. Although he has not yet been adopted, DRNV will find him a nurturing family who can tolerate a little drool in return for a wonderful Doberman who just wants to be loved.

Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society: A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant was used to vaccinate rescued animals in PAWS' care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant provided needed vaccines for our rescued animals, which enabled us to adopt them out to loving homes and rescue new animals in their place. Every PAWS animal receives vaccines, spay/neuter, and other needed veterinary care before going to their new homes. We are grateful to the Shot at Life program for supporting our lifesaving efforts in this vital way.

How many pets did this grant help?

150

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mr. Marbles was found as a stray in West Philadelphia and rescued by PAWS. We took him in and provided him with his neuter surgery, microchip, flea treatment, and vaccinations. Mr. Marbles found a loving adopter two weeks after his rescue and now lives happily in Center City Philadelphia. After he went home, PAWS used his space to rescue a new cat in his place.

Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

$1,000 was used for our general expense account. Food, operation of the building, vet care (this is a huge one!), adoption programs (we frequently
run discount programs), staffing, education, community outreach, spay/neuter programs for the community -- these are just a few of the many things UPAWS uses donations and grants for. All help our pets and also help them find loving homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter is an open-admission NO KILL shelter in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. UPAWS is not controlled by outside sources, nor do they receive funding from outside sources. Marquette county does not provide financial support to UPAWS. UPAWS does not hold any political agenda with national organizations such as PETA or the Humane Society of the United States, nor do they receive monetary donations from them. So grants such as these are vital to the ongoing running of our shelter.

How many pets did this grant help?

UPAWS cares for 1,800 pets a year.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

CARMEL is one of many pets helped. She has a open sore that our vets have been treating for months. Grants such as this are used toward much-needed vet care for pets such as Carmel. Carmel is a pretty 5-year-old female spayed orange tabby. She was surrendered because the owner couldn't afford her pets. She is affectionate, friendly and cuddly. She is litterbox trained and nice and neat. Little Carmel has an allergy that has causes a sore boo-boo on her side, but this hasn't stopped Carmel from being the sweetest kitty at the shelter! She does wear a cone now while she has her vet-prescribed meds so she doesn't lick her side. This darling girl is wonderful and she loves her people friends. Carmel takes her medicine like an angel, loves to be touched and enjoys the company of all those that say hello to her. This is a wonderful girl who longs for a kind soul to take the time and really meet her. You'll see what a sweetheart she is.

Friends of the New Haven Animal Shelter: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

Our organization is an all-volunteer group that helps pay for medical care beyond what the City of New Haven can pay. This generous grant goes a long way to help dogs and cats get the help they need in order to be healthy when they go to their new homes.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant was used for eye and femur operations for two of our very deserving dogs.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One Saturday afternoon right before the shelter closed, a man rushed in carrying a young white pit bull in his arms. It was apparent that the dog was injured and couldn't walk. A member of the shelter staff rushed the dog to the vet, where it was determined that she had a badly broken femur. She was a sweet girl who didn't make a sound while she was being carried and in pain, and the decision was made to do everything possible to heal her. Now named Lucy, she had the surgery and recovered in the foster home of a generous volunteer who took the time to rehabilitate her. She is now fully recovered and awaits her forever home.

Cherry was found as a stray and got her name because of the double cherry eyes she had when she entered the shelter. Because she couldn't see, she was very fearful of her surroundings and was wary of trusting people. The volunteer group felt that she was suffering due to her condition and paid to have her eyes fixed. Now she is able to see that the world isn't so scary. She is still a work in progress when it comes to trusting strangers; however, we have found that once she trusts you, she is a very sweet and loving girl who wants nothing more than to get affection and love from people. We are hoping that she will find her family soon.

Webark Estates: Stretch and Scratch Cat Scratchers
What was the money or product used for?

Cats in our program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Cats love the scratchers!

How many pets did this grant help?

50

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lola, accepted into our Safe Kitty Program after her owner died, has really come out of her shell with the cat scratchers.

Oshkosh Area Humane Society: Stretch and Scratch Cat Scratchers
What was the money or product used for?

The products -- Stretch and Scratch cat scratchers -- are used for the cats that are being held temporarily in our stray and medical wings. Because they are housed in metal cages while they wait to be redeemed or moved to the adoption floor, they do not have access to a scratching post as our other cats do. So we put a Stretch and Scratch cat scratcher in every cage so they can relieve stress and calm themselves through scratching.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The ability to scratch provides cats the opportunity to behave normally, relieve stress and get mental and physical stimulation. This is very beneficial to cats who are new to our shelter and are in unfamiliar surroundings. It helps make their time in the holding and medical area much less stressful.

How many pets did this grant help?

350+

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We had two active kittens, Chai and Latte, that were being held in the medical wing for medical issues. They were extremely active and needed more stimulation than their cage could provide even though our staff interacted with them as much as possible. By putting the Stretch and Scratch cardboard scratchers in their cages, they had something to work off their energy and relieve stress. We noticed they became calmer a day after we put the Stretch and Scratch in their cages.

AARF (The Animal Adoption and Rescue Foundation): A Shot at Life Vaccination Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant of vaccines came in August 2013. We were able to vaccinate many cats and kittens over the next few weeks. I am attaching some pictures and stories of the cats/kittens who were helped with this grant.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

AARF is very grateful for the help these vaccines provided. It allowed us to do even more for those who came to use for assistance.

How many pets did this grant help?

300

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Mazie: My name comes from the word amazing. I am amazing because I was found in the middle of Stratford Rd. A nice man who rescued me and took me to the vet saved me from the traffic. I have cerebellar hypoplasia, which means I am unsteady on my feet and have a little shake to my head. The vet told my foster mom that I am deaf and partially blind, but I am the sweetest kitten you will ever meet. I even like to play with toys and I love to eat. DOB 3/13. Mazie was adopted by a physician who was completely willing to deal with her “issues.” We received a video of Mazie doing therapy -- climbing out of a box! She is healthy and happy and a constant source of love and joy to her family.

Khan: Khan is a seal point snowshoe Siamese boy. He is new to AARF so is still shy and getting to know us. Khan was born in May of 2013 (our best guess) and has been neutered. Additional note: Khan was adopted twice and returned because of his shyness. He has recently found his forever home and is doing well with his loving, patient family.

Barry: My name is Barry. I am an orange tabby cat -- neutered male -- with an exceptional personality (if I do say so myself). I was on the schedule to be euthanized at the animal shelter, but a staff member called AARF and I was rescued from the needle. I'm a friendly boy -- ready to play! When you meet me you may notice that my back right leg is shorter than my left -- doesn't slow me down much, so I don't even notice. DOB 5/11

Additional note on Barry: He was adopted by a disabled veteran. He said, “I had to adopt him because he has a missing foot. So do I.” We were all in tears when the two of them left for home together!

Huey: DOB 2012; neutered; abandoned at an apt complex. Huey has been adopted into a loving, forever home.

Ming Ling (top photo): DOB 4/2013; found behind an apt complex. Ming Ling has been adopted.

Dixie (bottom photo): DSH white/gray, s/f, 1.5 years old. Dixie was abandoned and brought to AARF by a neighbor. She resided here for about six months before she went to her forever home.

These are only of the few who benefited from the grant awarded to AARF. Please accept our sincere gratitude for this gift.

Humane Society of Southern Arizona: Cat Castles
What was the money or product used for?

The grant went to cardboard cat boxes/perches for the cats in our care at the HSSA. These boxes are vital to the enrichment and stimulation of the cats we are caring for while they are waiting for their forever home.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has allowed the HSSA to provide increased enrichment and stimulation for the cats in our care. The boxes/perches will remain with the cat or cats (if a bonded pair) through the duration of their time at the HSSA and will go home with each cat at the time of their adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will help approximately 600 cats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sweet and petite Luna was found as a stray and offered a second chance at the Humane Society of Southern Arizona. With a bad case of stomatitis, poor Luna had to have all of her teeth removed, except for four canines. She’s feeling much better now and can finally eat with gusto. Luna is making up for lost time by snuggling with every visitor willing to share a hug. This little lap cat adores her human friends and would love to have you all to herself. If you could offer Luna a chance at the good life, please meet this terrific tabby today at the Humane Society of Southern Arizona.

Jacob and Mose are two fluffy peas in a pod and can’t wait to find their forever home together! Transferred to the Humane Society of Southern Arizona from another shelter for a second chance, these bonded brothers have been through homelessness and illness but don’t mind life’s challenges as long as they have each other. Things are finally looking up for Jacob and Mose, who are now in good health and get to relax at the Humane Society of Southern Arizona while enjoying healthy food, great company and their new Cat Castle! Jacob climbs inside for a cozy hideout while Mose prefers to keep watch from the top. They can’t wait until they get to enjoy their Cat Castle with a family of their own.