Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Family Dog Rescue: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay medical expenses related to some of our dogs with medical problems.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant was very important to help fund medical care for our dogs in need.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Tim (first two photos) is a true survivor! This sweet 6- to 7-year-old cattle dog mix was found in Mexico having been hit by a car and left to die in the streets. He was luckily picked up by rescuers and brought to San Francisco via Operation Santa Paws, an intake that required a strenuous drive from San Francisco to Chula Vista and back up again to save the lives of 16 dogs. Upon Tim's arrival at Family Dog Rescue, we quickly found that his right hind leg had not healed properly. He was limping, and in clear pain from the leg. Working with the vets, we found that the leg ultimately would need to be amputated, an expensive but necessary surgery to greatly improve Tim's quality of life. Soon after surgery, Tim was taken into foster by some of our great volunteers. After a few weeks of vet rechecks and therapy, they made it official, and Tim now lives happily in his forever home in San Francisco.

Miss Marshmallow's life has been full of challenges, but she still manages to be one of the best pups you'll ever meet! In November of 2016, Marshmallow (third and fourth photos) came to Family Dog Rescue along with her 4-week-old puppy Nutella from the Porterville shelter in California. She is a very sweet girl, but we quickly realized how special she really was. Her pup was quickly adopted, but Marshmallow is still fighting and looking for her forever home. Marshmallow is (mostly) deaf, and may have some slight vision impairment too. This is fairly common given her being an all-white dog with blue eyes, but it didn't seem to explain all the other things she had that were a little off. Her tongue sticks out a tiny bit at all times, and she seemed to have a persistent cough that was not responding to normal kennel-cough protocols.

After numerous vet exams, we found that she had some past head trauma that broke her jaw, as well as having coccidioidmycosis, or Valley fever, a fungal infection that colonizes the lungs and which claimed the life of another Family Dog puppy early this year. Luckily, the vets believe they caught Marshmallow's case early enough, and she was started on a course of antifungal medication. Unfortunately, the treatment for Valley fever is extremely intense and can last for months, if not the rest of the dog's life. It requires strong antifungal medication given daily, as well as regular blood panels to make sure no damage is being done to the liver as a side effect of the medication. Despite her troubles and obstacles, Marshmallow is still a very happy girl! She loves to run and play, and is still waiting for her forever home. Meet Marshmallow: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36948374

Friendship Animal Protective League: Petfinder 20th Anniversary Grant
What was the money or product used for?

It was used to treat five dogs who had sustained severe injuries. We call those dogs the Petfinder Five.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant allowed us to save the lives of five dogs who may not have received a second chance without the support of this grant.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant helped provide vet care for five dogs. We call those dogs the Petfinder Five.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

In November of 2016, we were informed that we were one of 25 shelters being awarded a $10,000 grant. This grant had a primary objective of saving the lives of animals who might otherwise not have had an opportunity to find forever homes. That is exactly what Friendship APL did. It all began with a little dog named Penguin (first photo). Lorain police officer and Friendship APL volunteer Rick Broz found an injured dog in the city. He had been hit by a car. His leg and pelvis were left shattered. He spent several days at Lorain Animal Hospital before being transferred to our care. We took Penguin to West Park Animal Hospital. After x-rays, we knew the leg was too far gone to save. It would require amputation, followed by a month of rehabilitation in a foster home to allow the fractured pelvis to heal.

On Feb. 25, 2017, Ashley Sims drove all the way from New Jersey to meet her sister at Friendship with her two Boston terriers in tow. She had been following Penguin’s story since his arrival. After a meet-and-greet between her and her four-legged family (second photo), Penguin was on his way home to the Garden State.

With Penguin’s story came a series of dogs who had sustained similar injuries, either by accident or inflicted on purpose, and who all had similar issues. Next up was dog number two – Lola! Nine-month-old Lola (third photo) arrived from the Mahoning County dog pound. She was intended to be an easy adoption from an overcrowded shelter needing help. Shortly after arrival, though, our volunteers and staff noticed some swelling and tenderness in her front leg. We took her to West Park for x-rays. To our disbelief, she had been walking around on a leg that had been broken most likely weeks before she'd arrived at the Mahoning County Dog Pound. It had actually begun to heal, but in such a way as to cause much discomfort for the poor girl. The leg at this point could not be saved and once again would require the leg to be amputated. Lola officially arrived at Friendship APL on Jan. 9. She found her new home on Jan. 28.

Coincidentally, while we were sitting in the emergency clinic with Lola, the City of Cleveland dog warden walked in with a dog who had been hit by a car (fourth photo). What was wrong with the young boxer mix? You guessed it: another broken leg! The dog would be made comfortable by the West Park staff and held for three days should an owner step forward. No owner stepped forward, and Friendship agreed to help the stray dog. Dog number three would come to be known as Serendipity, because if we had not been there with Lola, would we ever have had the opportunity to help her?

Serendipity’s injury was recent. Thanks to the work of the Cleveland Kennel and the team at West Park, her leg was able to be saved. It required the placement of plates and pins, but she would be the only dog in this story able to keep her leg. Serendipity officially arrived at Friendship APL on Feb. 1 (she arrived at West Park Animal Hospital on Jan. 9). She would find her forever home on Feb. 4.

Next up was Arrow, an 8-month-old pit bull (fifth photo). This was a direct request from a veterinarian. This sweet boy was surrendered to the vet for euthanasia following an injury to his rear leg. After seeing the multitude of stories over the past two weeks, it made sense that the staff would reach out to us to help. Arrow arrived at Friendship APL on Jan. 14. He found a loving family on Jan. 18!

So that made four. The final dog in the bunch (sixth photo) was very special. We had emergency call come in concerning a puppy who had been attacked by another dog. The good Samaritan was able to rescue the dog from the attack and drive him over to Friendship APL. The little beagle mix was only 4 or 5 months old. The injury was so severe, it required immediate surgery. Their were two immediate concerns. Bite wounds are more likely to become infected, and her leg had been snapped in two. This would be the hardest decision we would have to make.

We had two choices. One: We could put pins and plates in and save her leg. Or two: We could amputate. Option one seemed like the obvious choice. However, upon further discussion with her veterinarian, this could result in multiple surgeries. Given her age, her leg would continue to grow. This could result in her having to undergo multiple surgeries over several weeks. With each surgery, there would be a risk of complication. We decided to go with option two. She would only have to spend a few weeks recovering in a foster home adjusting to life on three legs before heading to a new home. And that is exactly what happened.

Aubrey arrived at the shelter on Jan. 22. She found her Valentine on Feb. 14.

One of the strangest parts of this story is that Penguin would lose his right, rear leg. Lola would lose her right, front leg. Arrow would lose his left, rear leg. Aubrey would lose her right, front leg. That means every dog who needed surgery in January would lose a different leg (except Serendipity, who did not lose a leg at all). What are the odds of that?

On behalf of our entire staff, volunteers and the Petfinder Five, we extend our most heartfelt gratitude for helping us save their lives.

Capital Area Humane Society: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Toys, treats and enrichment items for our Freedom from Boredom program.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Freedom from Boredom provides mental, physical and social stimulation to animals in our shelter to keep their minds and bodies busy. Enrichment keeps social, well-adjusted animals from declining in a shelter environment and helps bring out the real personality in animals who originally present as hostile, scared or unreceptive to human contact.

How many pets did this grant help?

648 during the three-month period.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Chance is a large pit bull rescued by our humane agents in November 2016 after he was found abandoned by his owners. Upon admission, he was scared and reactive, needing to be control-poled to be vaccinated. Thanks to the hard work of staff and volunteers in our enrichment program, we were able to uncover a very smart, playful boy who delighted in puzzle toys, games, and all types of sensory enrichment. His behavior improved and he was able to be placed up for adoption in late January of 2017 and found his forever home on April 4, 2017.

"Thank you so much to the Petfinder Foundation for providing an Adoption Options in Action grant in support of the Capital Area Humane Society’s enrichment program. We provide the highest quality of care for our animals and have raised the bar this past year by adding a formal enrichment program to provide physical, intellectual and social enrichment options for our animals. The grant enabled us to purchase enrichment items such as puzzle feeders, ball pits, bubble machines, healthy treats, scenting products and more. We want to keep wiggle-butts wiggling and introduce new experiences to animals who may have only known life at the end of a chain with little socialization. Thank you for helping our cats, dogs, rabbits and many 'other' species that we care for each year!"

Rachel D.K. Finney, CAWA
Executive Director
Capital Area Humane Society

(Third photo: Potbellied pig Little Bit enjoying his puzzle feeder and ball)

Rocky Mountain Feline Rescue: Petfinder 20th Anniversary Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $10,000 Petfinder 20th Anniversary Grant was used for spay and neuter costs for 250 shelter cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In the first quarter of 2017, Rocky Mountain Feline Rescue has transferred 441 cats into the shelter, and 219 and of those cats were through the “Second Chance” program -- a 60% increase from the prior year over the same period. The shelter believes this rate of intake will continue throughout the year and Rocky Mountain Feline Rescue may spend close to $45,000 in spays and neuters of shelter cats this year.

How many pets did this grant help?

250

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Staten Island (first photo) is a 6-year-old male, domestic long-haired, sand-colored tabby. When he came to us at the rescue, he was completely matted. After a close shave and with his coloring, Staten Island is a handsome little lion cat looking for his forever home! He's a total love bug, but would do best in a house where he can be the only cat. Meet Staten Island: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37598181

Brewtus (second photo) is a dapper 1-year-old tuxedo male. He is a very active cat, and is not shy about seeking your attention. This very chatty boy like to climb as well! Brewtus would be best in a household without another aggressive male cat. Meet Brewtus: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37514857

Zipper (third photo) is a regal 10-year-old female tabby who loves to hang out in the sunny spots in the shelter. She is a big lady! This chill cat would do best in a low-energy home with some mature, laid-back owners willing to let her just be herself. Her active years may be behind her, but she's a healthy, happy cat who loves a chin tickle while she naps in the sun Meet Zipper: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34489509

Kentucky Dachshund Rescue: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Surgery for Rusty, a dachshund

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

One, but he is special.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Rusty's surgery was delicate and expensive. After several fundraisers, we were still short on funds to provide him a normal life. The Petfinder Foundation provided a generous grant of $1,000 to help Rusty have his first paw surgery on his right paw. Rusty is in recovery now with a cast for six to eight weeks. He will be able to use his paw normally within four weeks. However, we are still needing to provide surgery on his left paw. The vets have given us a discount if done in six months so we are working hard to make it happen. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

The Humane Society of Greater Kansas City: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to help with expenses for one of our dog's broken legs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

This grant helped Aiden, who was picked up by Animal Control with a broken leg. His leg was broken in multiple places and he had to see a specialty vet to get it fixed. From his Petfinder profile: "Aiden is an adorable pit bull/boxer mix. He’s 1 1/2 years old, and he is such a sweetie! He loves people and loves attention. Aiden takes treats very gently and seems to have a medium energy level. He also keeps his kennel clean. He weighs 62 lbs. and could fill out a little more. Aiden does cry when left alone, so he wouldn’t be a good match for apartment living. Aiden was a stray and he had a broken leg when he was picked up by KCK Animal Control. He was taken to Blue Pearl for treatment. His cast has been removed since these photos were taken and he's walking very well now. Aiden gets along well with other dogs. If you have a dog you can make an appointment to bring your dog in to meet Aiden. We've also tested him with the cats in our cat room and he seems to be fine with cats, too. Aiden has been neutered, vaccinated, microchipped and tested for heartworms. He’s a sweet boy!" Meet Aiden: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37366178

SPCA of Anne Arundel County: Susie's Senior Dogs Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Medication (phenobarbital and glucosamine)

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Co Coa's seizures and arthritis are now managed with her phenobarbital and glucosamine.

How many pets did this grant help?

Two (until one of them passed away in February)

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Co Coa and her sister, Frieda, were surrendered to us back in January (in the first photo, Frieda is on the left and Co Coa is on the right). They were two little old ladies who did not do well in the shelter environment. Freida was 10 and Co Coa had just turned 12; they were very confused and depressed upon being surrendered to us. Back in February, just a month after being dropped off at the shelter, Frieda passed away. Co Coa was placed into a very loving foster home with four other dogs (all small pups!) and she is loving her life!! She is being spoiled by her foster mom and enjoys going to SPCA events to get lots of love and attention from anyone she meets. She's a true Lab! Co Coa is still looking for her forever home! Meet Co Coa: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36756108

Humane Society of McCormick County: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The donor contacted us and wanted to sponsor Demi's adoption fee.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Demi was just 5 weeks old last April when she was picked up with severe upper-respiratory and eye infections. She healed, but ended up with a somewhat weepy eye. She was a very loving kitty, but her looks turned some people off. Demi's adoption fee was sponsored in February and she was adopted less than two months later by an engaged couple living in an apartment. She had been with us a whole year, so the sponsorship definitely helped her get adopted. Her new parents have been sending pictures and report that she is doing great in her new home and they may come back to adopt another cat.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Demi was just 5 weeks old last April when she was picked up with severe upper-respiratory and eye infections. She healed, but ended up with a somewhat weepy eye. She was a very loving kitty, but her looks turned some people off. In February, a kind woman from Pennsylvania found her on the website. She wasn’t interested in adopting, but Demi’s story spoke to her and she sponsored her adoption fee. We made up a sign that said her adoption fee was sponsored and used it at adoption events. And then a kind woman came to the shelter this week to see our cats. She spent time with many of them and Demi was her pick. She was surprised and happy that Demi’s adoption fee was sponsored because then she could give a donation in the future to help another kitty get adopted. She has already reported that Demi is settling in well. She was adopted a year after she was picked up.

Grey Face Rescue & Retirement: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Emergency Medical Grant we received from the Petfinder Foundation was used for the ongoing care of Nellie, a dog in our rescue. She required medication exceeding $200 per month.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped our organization immensely by supporting the costs of Nellie's medication. We were also able to buy a bulk quantity of her medication, which encouraged her foster to adopt her.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Nellie came to Grey Face Rescue & Retirement from Siouxland Humane Society in Sioux City, Iowa. Nellie was a young lady deserving of a second chance. At only 7 years old, Nellie suffered from CHF (congestive heart failure), urinary incontinence, a heart murmur and severe arthritis in her left forearm. Nellie received x-rays of her heart and lungs, x-rays of her extremities to determine the cause of her left forearm limp (which was determined to be severe arthritis), full-panel bloodwork, and urinalysis and a urine culture, along with a consultation by an orthopedic surgeon at VCA Feist and Forest Lake Clinic. Nellie is currently prescribed Pimobendan, Furosemide, Proin, Carprofen and Tramadol, which cost over $200 per month. Nellie was as sweet as can be and was looking for a home to call her own forever.

From her Petfinder profile: "Nellie is a beautiful, sweet old girl who is pretty laid-back and easygoing, which means she'll transition really easily into any kind of household! She enjoys going for walks and will sit for a treat. She is a bit shy when she first meets you, but quickly warms up to you as long as you give her lots of love and belly rubs. She is not one who likes to play fetch; she would prefer to be by your side and just lounge around. Nellie does have a heart condition that requires medication every 12 hours, but it's very manageable and she can still live a full, happy life!"

Nellie received the medical care she so much deserved and now lives happily with her foster family, who have adopted her :)

Stray Animal Adoption Program: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The $80 (Ozzy) and $145 (Toby) donations were used to provide vetting needs for both dogs, including vaccines and neuter.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Since all SAAP animals are required to be neutered (or spayed) and fully vetted prior to adoption, these funds have allowed Ozzy to be adopted and has prepared Toby for adoption.

How many pets did this grant help?

2

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We are pleased to report that Ozzy (first and second photos) has found his forever home! We thank the anonymous donor who supported Ozzy while he was in SAAP's care.

Toby (third and fourth photos) is a cute and cuddly Shih Tzu who would love a forever home in a child-free home that has a loving and patient human, with animals who will not bother his food! Until he finds his forever home, Toby is in good hands with his foster mama, Brooke, who provides love, guidance, and treats. Meet Toby: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36737193