Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

TARPS - The Animal Rescue and Protection Society: Shelter+ Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

Our veterinary bill.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

As a no-kill shelter, we receive many animals with health issues. Our veterinary bills are always the largest part of our budget. This grant allows the cats to receive vaccinations, spay/neuter, and medical treatment when necessary.

How many pets did this grant help?

This is a difficult number to calculate. It would cover 28 neuters, or 16 spays, or 100 rabies vaccinations.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Around the time of this grant, we received a call on a Sunday morning about a small kitten (approx 4-5 weeks old) that was found on the steps of a church in nearby Ludlow, Vermont. We took her to the vet immediately and found she had been bitten on top of the head and under her chin. She couldn't hold her head straight and was in severe pain. With great veterinary care and a loving foster mom Athena is now a healthy, active little girl.

Mid-Atlantic Pug Rescue: Shelter Challenge
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to pay for veterinary bills for pugs that were in our rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We accept pugs regardless of their age or health in our rescue. This grant helped us pay our veterinary fees. In 2012 our vet fees were over $100,000.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant helped specifically helped two pugs with very expensive veterinary bills.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Faith was found as a stray with chemical burns on over 40% of her body and in severe pain in North Carolina. With the help of one of our rescue vets, her caring foster home, and this grant, Faith has shown tremendous progress. Our vet doesn't think all of her hair will come back so she will require sunscreen and need to wear clothes, but she will be able to lead a normal pug life. Faith was adopted and is now living the good life in Charlotte, NC.

Oklahoma City Animal Welfare Division: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to pay for the direct care of 42 storms pets, which included feeding, enrichment (toys, blankets, beds), and daily care. Our board-and-care fee is $10 a day, which is what each pet is charged out to, except for the first day, for which no charge was made.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We committed to keep storm pets 30 days from the date of intake to give owners ample time to find their lost pets. We did keep pets longer, and we do have a couple of pets left in our adoption program. The grant allowed us to keep our commitment so that animals didn't need to be euthanized for time/space. We are an organization dedicated to providing the best services and programs possible to our community. As the largest shelter in the state, we find ourselves called upon to assist metro communities with disaster response and some sheltering (we take in about 3,000 pets a year from neighboring communities as a service to the pets). However, we are not funded to harbor these extra pets, so this grant allowed us to not only assist the Oklahoma City community, which was affected by the tornadoes, but it allowed us to assist the City of Moore and Oklahoma County with displaced and injured animals.

How many pets did this grant help?

We saved 42 pets with this funding. All of them were either adopted, returned to their owners, or transferred to rescue-group adoption programs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Shilo is a tan, male Labrador Retriever. He came into our shelter as a puppy on Feb. 3, 2012. He was too young to place into adoption, so we sent him to a foster home for a month. He came back on Feb. 27, 2012, and was adopted to a woman who lives in Norman, OK, on March 2, 2012. Norman is about 15 miles from Oklahoma City.

On June 8, 2013, Shilo was brought to the shelter with multiple minor injuries after the May 31 tornado/high wind event. On June 10, 2013, his adopter reclaimed him. We were able to identify his owner through the tattoo we placed on his stomach when we neutered him prior to his adoption.

We are often able to reunite pets and owners through tattoos, tags or microchips, but it was especially gratifying to be able to reunite an owner and a lost pet after 1) a disaster event; 2) through our tattooing process; and 3) especially after originally fostering and adopting one through our shelter. Shilo came full-circle during this event, and we are thrilled for him and his person.

Doxy's Horse Recovery, Inc.: Tractor Supply Company Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Doxy's used $578 for dental and [eye] exams and treatment as indicated. The remaining $422 was used to purchase hay.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We have 2 horses who exhibited eye conditions that were examined with recommendations provided by the veterinary to enhance the quality of life and promote the safety of these 2 equines. Six horses were examined by an equine dentist to ensure proper and comfortable grinding to promote optimal nutrition. The funds provided through the grant enabled us to provide our adoptable horses with services that are surely important to their lives but not always able to be provided for financially. Having the "gift" of hay for our 17 adoptable horses was a plus and benefits each horse.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant specifically helped 8 adoptable horses and contributed to the daily welfare of the other 9 horses waiting to be adopted

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Windsong was a senior, 25 year old, mare that came to us in poor condition. Through improved nutrition, dental and good daily care she blossomed into a handsome senior and was adopted on September 7, 2013 to a wonderful, loving home. Magnum, who had been adopted and was waiting to go to his new home, was found to have failing peripheral vision and will now remain at Doxy's until he can be adopted to a family with no more than 2 other horses in order for him to safely live. The first 2 photos show Windsong's before and after pictures and the 3rd shows Magnum in a pasture where he can safely live with only 1-2 other horses.

Center Valley Animal Rescue: Tractor Supply Company Grant
What was the money or product used for?

CVAR used the grant money to complete and build two horse pasture shelters. Cement floors had been laid for both shelters and one shelter had been partially constructed. Both shelters are now completed. Labor for the project came to $870.00 and additional materials needed came to $716.34 for a total of $1586.34. CVAR used the Petfinder/Tractor supply grant for the first $1,000.00 and CVAR paid out of its own reserves for the remainder.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

CVAR is located in Quilcene, WA, an area which experiences fall and winter rain and snow storms. It is essential for the well being of our large farm animals to have adequate shelter during inclement weather. Additionally, the shelters are used as a shelter for the feed for these animals so that the feed does not become water logged or moldy. A third reason for the shelters is to enable our Veterinarian to examine and treat animals with a cement floor and a sheltered roof.

How many pets did this grant help?

CVAR takes care of an average of 140 to 150 animals at any given time. As one of the few local places which takes large farm animals, CVAR averages around 10 to 14 horses, 4 llamas, 2 alpacas, 3 sheep, 4 goats, 1 emu, 1 large steer and 1 large pig.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Page was one of four horses who came to CVAR through the efforts of CVAR and the local sheriff department. Page, a 25 year old thoroughbred, was in the worst shape. Along with being covered with lice and other parasites, she had three split hooves and a heart murmur due to muscle breakdown from starvation. This once beautiful racehorse looked pathetic. In just the first 24 hours, each horse put on about 20 pounds with just water and bland grass hay. After a month, they had gained 76 to 189 pounds. Page was the one who gained the most weight. It's amazing what proper feeding and good medical care and love can do.

Almost Home Humane Society: One Picture Saves a Life
What was the money or product used for?

We have been giving the camera to our volunteers who are interested in taking photos and videos of our adoptable animals!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant has helped us promote our animals in more way then we could of imagined. By having more volunteers photograph our animals, they are getting to know them on a deeper level and then spreading the word to their friends. Some of our volunteers are still getting use to taking videos with the camera but those who have mastered it are showing the public how that behave outside their kennels which is very important.

How many pets did this grant help?

So far, ~25

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We have had several animals be adopted rather quickly based upon their photographs taken with the Canon Rebel. One specific kitten would be Neil (grey and white) who was adopted almost instantly due to his photo!

Pig Pals of NC: Tractor Supply Company Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Feed purchased from the Tractor Supply store in Siler City, NC. Wood and fencing to expand existing structures to accommodate 4 new pigs, and medical expenses.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant award from Tractor Supply was used in various ways. The organization used the grant to purchase feed for over 30 miniature pigs. In fact, the feed was purchased from the Siler City, NC Tractor Supply store! In addition, we had 2 newly rescued pigs that needed emergency medical care. One pig was rescued with hooves that were 5-6" in length, crippled, and not walking (Abigail). Her companion pig (Bearista) had a 8" by 4" mass on her abdomen. Both had to be seen immediately by our attending veterinarian upon intake. To our sadness, Bearista passed away 2 weeks after surgery. Her necropsy revealed lesions within the intestines and cancer. Finally, we expanded our pig barn to accommodate 3 other new pigs that came to reside with Pig Pals of NC. So, the funds were also used to purchase wood for separating the stalls and fence panels for expanding outdoor pens.

How many pets did this grant help?

35

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Abigail was rescued with hooves that were 5-6" in length, crippled, and not walking. Her companion pig (Bearista) had an 8" by 4" mass on her abdomen. Both had to be seen immediately by our attending veterinarian upon intake. To our sadness, Bearista passed away 2 weeks after surgery. Her necropsy revealed lesions within the intestines and cancer. Also, we expanded our pig barn to accommodate 3 other new pigs that came to reside with Pig Pals of NC (Max, Baxter, and Rooty).

Suncoast Humane Society: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds awarded by this grant will greatly benefit Suncoast Humane Society and ultimately the people and animals of the communities we serve. Your support helps us to continue our affordable spay/neuter program and preventive health care services. We continue to offer our pet pantry that provides food for pets belonging to families also suffering from the economy. As the area’s only open admission animal care center, we continue to accept and care for the communities’ lost, abandoned and abused animals. The support of the Foundation is truly appreciated.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

On average, it costs Suncoast Humane Society $250 per animal surrendered to our shelter. Included in these costs is spay/neuter surgery, testing, vaccines, possible specialized medical care, possible fostering (supplies for foster parents), the cost of food and the salaries for the animal care staff who are entrusted with caring for our shelter animals. At the time an animal is surrendered we request a $25 donation per animal. Often times, people are unable to fulfill the whole donation amount as they are giving up the animal due to financial distress. We typically receive an average of $10 per animal, of which the remaining medical and housing costs must be covered through grants and general donations. In order to make more animals adoptable, we have gone above and beyond to ensure the health and well-being of our shelter animals. This is all being done for little monetary return. Throughout 2012, Suncoast Humane Society held several adoption promotion specials that offered reduced adoption fees. Rather than see homeless animals sit in our shelter, these types of promotions helped to get pets into stable, loving homes where they belong. These promotions were very successful as evidenced by the 1,100 animals that were placed into new homes this past year. By allocating the funds from this generous grant to the costs associated with our adoptable animals, we were able to ensure more animals were being placed more quickly into permanent homes

How many pets did this grant help?

Since receipt of the grant money we have adopted out or returned to owner 261 animals. These funds help us place more animals in forever homes and help to reduce the number of homeless animals in our community.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

An adoption story that we are proud of is Harley (now Koufax). Harley's new family had adopted from us in the past, adopting Zeus, AKA Ripkin, last year. When they decided to add another pet to their family, they thought of us first because of the wonderful experience they had during their previous adoption. Zeus and Koufax became fast friends and the family said they are like brother and sister now.

Another great adoption story is about Pretty. Pretty came to us as an owner give-up because their finances had taken a bad turn and they could not longer afford to keep her. Pretty is a 9 year old female Chihuahua. After examining Pretty our animal care manager determined that she had severe dental disease which needed treatment prior to being put up for adoption. Thanks to our Shelter Angel Program, which is promoted solely as an incentive for our caring donors wishing to help individual animals with medical needs, we were able to treat Pretty and restore her smile. She then became available for adoption and found her forever home with the Butlers. They LOVE their little Pretty and she is adjusting beautifully to her new home. She loves to have her belly rubbed and snuggles in bed with them.

Dream Equine Therapy Center: Tractor Supply Company Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 grant was used for Strategy horse feed. We were able to buy 60 bags of feed which fed our yearling and older horses for 6 weeks.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant directly affected 20 horses by providing them feed for 6 weeks. This grant also indirectly affected 50 + more horses/foals. We are scheduled to break ground on building our new foal barn at the end of Sept. By providing this grant, it helped us to conserve our funds to be able to build the barn as scheduled. This barn is crucial for us to be able to continue to rescue orphan foals in 2014.

How many pets did this grant help?

It directly affected 20 horses; indirectly affected 50+ horses/foals

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Story/Pic #1-Bambie- Bambie was rescued at just 2 weeks old and was raised on milk replacer. She was adopted at a few months old and was returned earlier this year due to her owner losing her business. She was sent to a trainer to start her under saddle in late May as a 3 year old. She was adopted in July by Brooke, a 13-year-old girl. They love each other and trail ride every day. Story/Pic #2 Storm - Storm was also rescued at a few weeks old. She was adopted at a few months old and was returned as a 2 year old, not even halter broke. She was like a wild mustang. Through the help of a few trainers she was started under saddle earlier this year as a 3 year old. She was recently adopted by Regan, a 13-year-old girl, and they also will be hitting the trails and shows soon. Over recent years with the economic downslide we have had 10+ horses returned every year due to no fault of their own. Most reasons are due to owner finances. Whenever a horse in our program is in need, we always offer them assistance or a home. We then provide proper training and again find them a good, qualified home. This grant was also able to assist with these horses that again found themselves homeless.

Good Shepherd Humane Society, Inc: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Half of the grant funds are being used for staff training (scheduled for the month of October -- a 4-week class with a trainer/behavior management issues). The other half is being used to purchase accoustic wall mats for the long dog runs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Good Shepherd averages about 40 dogs in the shelter daily. Some of our dogs have been here a year. Although they get regular walks and exercise outside, the kennels can be noisy and uninviting to potential adopters. The training class will give all the staff and any of our dog volunteers who want to participate a basic level training to handle large and small dogs, plus help us all be "on the same page" in dealing with dogs who are experiencing stress or other difficulties. rn The accoustic mats will help decrease the noise from the dogs barking. We have two long runs perpendicular to each other. The structure is concrete block, so the noise just reverberates. If we can reduce the noise volume with the mats, the dogs will be calmer, and then potential adopters will be better able to talk with the animals and with staff in a friendlier environment.

How many pets did this grant help?

approximately 40

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Molly and Sarah have been with Good Shepherd for over a year. They are sisters and have never been apart. The staff training will help us build on our work to help the girls deal with kennel stress. Also, both dogs get quite agitated when the other dogs start barking, and the accoustic mats to lower noise levels will help keep them calmer.