Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

F.R.I.E.N.D.S. Horse Rescue & Sanctuary: Disaster Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $2,000 grant was used to purchase a new, dry storage container for feed, hay and supplements. We purchased the container from Mason Builders Corp. for $2,554.45 on Oct. 30, 2017, and the cost included delivery. The price had gone up due to the demand for containers after the storm.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Your grant enabled us to purchase a new, dry storage container for the feed, hay and supplements for all of the animals. Our container was damaged badly by Hurricane Irma. While we did not take a direct hit, we did have a lot of rain, wind and tornadoes that affected the facility. We had not budgeted for these types of expenses and we did not have the funds in savings. A tree had fallen on top of our container and it was leaking badly, and the door would no longer close properly. The danger was in getting any of the feed, hay or supplements wet, as they could mold quickly, between the extreme heat and damp conditions. We also had to ensure that rodents could not get to the feed and supplements, as they would eat, urinate and defecate in them, making them unsafe for consumption. Should the horses eat moldy hay or grain, we could have had several horses get colic, resulting in added vet bills and potentially death. Had the goats eaten moldy hay, they too could die. This grant was a lifesaver for us in a life-or-death situation. We are so grateful for the quick action and generosity of the Petfinder Foundation.

How many pets did this grant help?

We have 43 horses, two miniature donkeys, one hinny, eight potbellied pigs, two farm pigs, two goats and one cat. This grant helped 59 animals.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

All of our animals were affected by the weather and they were standing in a flooded pasture. We were lucky the water did not go into the stalls, so they were dry. The feed, hay and supplement situation was extremely important. Pictured is Sure Shot, an adult miniature hose. Meet him: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/39897454

Animal Adoption Center: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

See below.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The Kong toys help keep our dogs mentally happy as they wait to find their forever homes.

How many pets did this grant help?

All 42 dogs that we can house at any given time.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

The Kong toys are used to keep our dogs engaged and occupied while they're in their kennels. The toys help all of our dogs. Pictured is Buck. "Shhhh ... I'm making my New Year's wish. When I open my eyes, my new family will be standing in front of me." Buck's hung around AAC long enough in 2017. He is ready for his furever family!

Animal Adoption Center: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The funds were used to prepare and print materials for our Humane Education program. The program allows senior staff to travel to local schools and present information to students of all ages and income levels.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant allows AAC, on a continuing basis, to educate the public about the importance of the rescue community. We are also able to provide resources to the public about the importance of proper vet care, spay/neuter and microchipping.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant assisted in the adoption of more than 100 pets.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Peanut and Luna (first photo) re a bonded pair who came from [an open-admission] shelter in rural Georgia. Bonded pairs present a challenge to adopters because most are only anticipating the adoption of one pet. They were adopted by a teacher at one of the schools where we gave our humane presentation. Zadie, who was adopted recently, was also adopted by a family that saw the presentation (second photo).

Second Chance Dog Rescue: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

We received a box of Kong toys to use for our dogs in foster care. These have been amazing to get because we haven't been able to afford to buy any for adoption events or fosters since we operate on such a tight budget.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

These Kong toys have been amazing for our dogs while they're at adoption events or while crate-training in their foster homes. The Kong toys are so much easier to use than any other options because we can fill them with all sorts of fun recipes and freeze them and the dogs enjoy them so much!!!

How many pets did this grant help?

50

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

I have attached pictures of Dominic, who was enjoying the Kong toy while in his foster home. These have been extremely important on days when we've had bad weather (snow and below-freezing temperatures) to keep the dogs entertained when bored.

Wag N Train Terrier Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Willa received Apoquel for her skin allergies.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

By receiving this grant, we were able to provide Willa with the medication needed to keep her comfortable and regain her health.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Willa was found in a small town by one of our volunteers who was meeting another party surrendering a dog. She had been passed from one owner to the next, no one really wanting her or caring enough about her to keep her indoors and well-fed. She was suffering from skin allergies and multiple medical problems, making her unadoptable. After months of love, veterinary care, a specialized diet and medication, she regained her good health and was adopted by her foster family, who proclaim that "she is the perfect dog"!

Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc.: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant money was used for veterinary treatment of Wobbles, a 10-lb. poodle mix. Wobbles entered our facility with a severe injury to his left rear leg. The leg was dangling and required immediate treatment. Evaluation at our veterinary office (Tysor Veterinary Clinic) revealed that the little guy had been the victim of a gunshot wound. The bones were shattered, with bullets embedded in his pelvic bone. On Nov. 9, 2017, Wobbles underwent amputation surgery of the rear left leg with partial hip removal.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped our nonprofit rescue/shelter provide the proper veterinary care and treatment that Wobbles required. He is recovering well and is currently in foster care with his potential adoptive family. Wobbles and Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc., are very thankful for this grant so that we were able to help this sweet boy overcome the horrific abuse that he suffered and move forward with his love of life.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Wobbles was found wandering in and out of traffic on a busy North Carolina highway. A concerned citizen scooped him up out of danger, only to realize that he was suffering from a severe rear-leg injury. He was brought to the Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc., shelter facility, where immediate triage care was started. Wobbles was transported to Tysor Veterinary Clinic, where x-rays revealed a tragic injury: Wobbles had been the victim of a horrific gunshot wound to his left rear leg.

X-rays showed where the large bullet had torn through his leg, shattering bones and finally lodging deep in his pelvic bones. The tissue damage was healing, although the leg had atrophied and the bone damage was so severe that amputation was the only real option at this point for little Wobbles. The pain and suffering that this tiny 10-lb. poodle mix must have gone through with this injury is unimaginable!

Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc., was committed to providing this sweet boy with the best medical care possible. This type of injury was well above our already stretched veterinary budget for 2017. With the help of the Petfinder Foundation and private sponsors and donors, Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc., was able to provide this little fellow the lifesaving treatment that he required.

Wobbles underwent amputation surgery on Nov. 9, 2017, to remove his mangled rear leg, along with a portion of his hip. This little fellow came through the surgery better than expected and thrived under the care of Dr. Joanna Tysor, DVM, and the staff at Tysor Veterinary Clinic. He is making a remarkable recovery and enjoying life in his foster-to-adopt home, where he will never again have to worry about being subjected to the horrific abuse from his past. The future is bright for little Wobbles thanks to the Petfinder Foundation, and all the supporters of Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc.

Pflugerville Animal Shelter: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

An assortment of Kongs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Due to kennel stress, many of the dogs rip up any toys we give them. The Kongs make it so that they can have a toy and something to do in the kennel.

How many pets did this grant help?

These Kongs will help countless dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Bobbo would tear up his beds and toys, so we gave him Kong. You could always see him in the kennel chewing on the Kong; it kept him focused and calm.

Bennington County Humane Society (dba Second Chance Animal Center): Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Grant funds received from the Petfinder Foundation were used to underwrite costs associated with our humane-education program. Approximately 1/3 of the funds were used to support one week of our Animal Adventure (summer) Camp for children ages 5-6 and the remaining 2/3 were used to support the work of our Education Director to implement our in-class CARE (Children & Animals Relationship Education) for the period of October through December 2017.

The summer camp session supported by this grant is called "Little Critters" and is an introduction to compassionate animal care for children ages 5-6. Besides a visit to our shelter to learn about the importance of animal socialization, children participate in craft activities, story time, and cooperative games with their fellow campers. Funds from this grant were used to support the two staff positions required to implement this program. A total of 15 children attended this half-day camp session.

At the close of the summer-camp session, our Education Director undertook the task of contacting, scheduling, and implementing our in-class education program, CARE. This staff member creates and sets the program curriculum, then contacts Bennington County prekindergarten and elementary school teachers to offer this fee-waived instruction in their classrooms. For the period of October through December 2017, for which this grant assisted, monthly lesson plans were created to include "I'm a Friend to Animals," "C is for Cat," and "Staying Safe Around Dogs." During this period, she instructed 1,162 children each month in 39 classes in a total of 16 schools. These monthly instructions include shelter-animal visits in the classroom, activities to reinforce the humane lessons, and games to help children better understand the lessons.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

Not Applicable

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

One way that this grant assisted with the animals in our care is to provide a socialization platform. Besides enriching the lives of children with the visit of a shelter animal, these animals benefit greatly from being around children and building their ability to interact with people of all ages. More importantly, this grant helped us to instruct the youth of our community and to teach them how to be compassionate toward companion animals and the community animals they see around them.

Whiskers Animal Benevolent League: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

We purchased 3016-lb. bags of Purina ONE Healthy Kitten Food and 15 16-lb. bags of Purina ONE Tender Selects for a total of 720 lbs. of high-quality cat food. An image of two invoices from Petco.com is attached below, showing the total spent was $988.38.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Quality nutrition matters.
*It helps pets look and feel their best
*It increases their chances of being adopted
With this grant we bought high-quality Purina ONE dry food to distribute to our foster homes so that our cats and kittens would be assured a healthy diet.

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant directly helped about 50 cats/kittens. We believe that many more are indirectly helped by setting a good example for both fosters and adopters to feed cats high-quality food.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lily was born in the city of Schenectady to a stray cat. She and her sister and their mom were eating out of dumpsters and living under a shed. Lily was lucky enough to be caught one rainy evening by a kind person who brought her to Whiskers. Lily was only 8 weeks old and in rough shape -- she was grossly underweight and infested with fleas and covered with scabs from their bites; she had patches of missing fur and had an upper-respiratory infection with runny eyes. The first night of her rescue, a volunteer combed Lily for hours to get the fleas off of her. Lily didn't make a sound; she just trembled and accepted the baby food she was offered. The next day, Lily went to see the veterinarian for a complete examination and we learned she had ringworm on top of all her other problems.

Ringworm thrives in a cat with a suppressed immune system. Many shelters will euthanize a cat simply because they have a ringworm infection, but we never do that at Whiskers. Lily went to a foster home where she could be treated and isolated from other cats while she recovered. Lily's recovery depended in part on good nutrition, which happened to include Purina ONE, to build her immune system. As her overall health improved, Lily was able to fight off the infection; her fur grew back with luster and her spirit became bright.

Our beautiful and healthy Lily was adopted on Nov. 25, 2017.

Rutland County Humane Society: Build-A-Bear Youth Humane Education Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for medical care over and above normal shelter vaccine and preventative measures. In addition, we used this money to improve our vaccination protocol to vaccinate all animals upon arrival, including strays, for kennel cough and administer flea and tick preventive treatment. Finally, we used the money to purchase the more expensive smallest size microchips for comfort, especially for kittens.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Rutland County Humane Society (RCHS) cared for more than 1,400 animals in 2017. In order to do this and to save lives of animals with medical needs, we run a deficit. While we can draw on savings to do some of this, grants allow us to be less selective in the animals who receive medical care for serious issues. By having this grant money we could save animals we may not have been able to without it.

How many pets did this grant help?

For medical care, four animals were helped. For general improved shelter care, approximately 350.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kahn (first photo) had been adopted from RCHS by a couple who later experienced some domestic issues. When they separated, Kahn stayed with the man and was receiving good care. However, the man faced possible incarceration and we believe that the day before his court hearing, he brought Kahn to the shelter at night and put him in an outdoor pen. We had no idea that this happened until later. We received reports of a dog running loose in a neighborhood near the shelter. The dog had no sense of the danger of cars, and people were afraid he'd be hurt. We set a humane dog trap, but he did not enter it. Then, one night, he was hit. A passerby called Animal Control and sat with Kahn until an officer arrived. The ACO took Kahn to the veterinary clinic that is open 24/7. We determined it was Kahn and that he had escaped from our pen. Kahn was admitted to the hospital and treated. One leg seemed to drag after he came back to the shelter. We sent him back for another examination and X-ray. As he came out of sedation, he threw up, and the clinic staff observed that Kahn had been eating a lot of toys. Kahn required surgery to remove all the ingested pieces of these toys. The leg issue appeared to be pain-related and he was put on gabapentin to help him during a period of physical therapy. Later, Kahn went to a foster family that eventually adopted him.

Gus and Duchess (second photo) were two older cocker spaniels who arrived at the shelter when their elderly owner could no longer care for them. Both had medical issues that included serious dental problems; both also had long-term chronic ear infections. Because of their ages, 8 and 11, we knew that adopting them out would be difficult with the veterinary care they both needed. We also knew they had to stay together. This all added up to ensuring that finding them a good home would be very hard. We used the grant money to cover dentals on both dogs, to resolve the ear infections and promote their adoption. Because of this, their stay at the shelter after their treatment was very short -- less than two weeks -- and they are happy in their forever home.