Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

Next Stop Forever: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Medication

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant helped us pay for vet services.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Symba came to us from a shelter in New York City. He was about 10 years old, weighed 20 lbs. and preferred to be the only dog. He was known to have seizures and was on daily medication but still having pretty bad seizures. With the help of this grant we were able to pay for his vet care to get him on the right medications. He has since been adopted and his seizures are now under control.

Happy Tales Ranch and Rescue: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

The money is being used to help the community feed their companion animals and afford vet care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We are able to help the public spay and neuter their cats, and provide shelter and quality food.

How many pets did this grant help?

Currently 12-16

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Happy Tales did have to rehome two cats when their elderly caregiver passed away. Sherlock and Watson were very unhealthy, and needed bloodwork and dentals with multiple extractions. They responded very well and have been adopted. The last picture is one of the cats we are assisting with vet care and providing food.

Animal Welfare League of Arlington: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The product is being used as an enrichment tool for our dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

See below.

How many pets did this grant help?

The Kongs we received could potentially enrich hundreds of dogs' lives because they last so long! We can wash and reuse them for many, many dogs.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Kongs are a great way to enrich a dog’s stay in the kennels. Because dogs tend to get bored in the shelter, we stuff Kongs with wet dog food and put them in the freezer, and they can be a great attention-holder for hours! They truly make the dogs very happy! Here are photos of (from top) Preston, Duke and Taz enjoying Kongs in their kennels. Preston has been adopted.

SPCA Montreal: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

We received a donation of $1,900 ($2,483 Canadian dollars) that we are using to buy collars for all the cats who are adopted. We did 3,857 cat adoption in 2016 and 480 cat adoptions in January and February 2017. We bought 1,000 collars to start this project and we plan to buy 1,000 more in April. The collars are $1.50 CAD each.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Since we received the grant, all cats leave the shelter with a collar and a microchip tag attached to it. It helps for a better identification in case they get lost. Most of the cats in Montreal do not have any type of identification and we are not able to find the owner of the stray cats that we receive. The owners are not able to find their cats as they are not identified. Now, adopters can become more aware of the importance of identifying their pets.

How many pets did this grant help?

2,000

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Pictured with their new collars and tags are (from top): Zeus, Zoro and Grisou. From Zeus's Petfinder profile: "Hi, my name is Zeus. I am an 8-years-old male! I weigh 6.10 kg. My fur is short, which would need low levels of grooming. I have never met other cats, dogs or children, but if you come to the Montreal SPCA, you will be able to discuss with an adoption counselor whether we could get along! I am a quiet, loving and kind cat." Meet Zeus: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37498106

Molino de Suenos/Windmill of Dreams Animal Rescue and Sanctuary: Emergency Medical Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $1,000 that we received for emergency care was used to pay for leg surgery for a rescued dog. Vladimir was rescued on the side of the road after being hit by a car. He had multiple fractures in his rear right leg that would not heal with a simple splint.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Vladimir had a 100% recovery and was successfully adopted by a family in Washington.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Vladimir is a 1-year-old Siberian husky who was hit by a car on a major highway in San Antonio, Texas. He was taken to a veterinary clinic and x-rays showed multiple fractures in his leg. The fracture was exposed (the skin was broken and macerated), increasing the risk of infection and incomplete healing. The options were orthopedic surgery with the use of pins/plates or amputation. We opted for the surgery. Vladimir had 100% recovery of his leg function and has been adopted.

CARRMISSOURI (Coalition for Animal Response and Rescue Missouri): Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The grant funds will be used to have concrete and/or gravel poured, purchasing a large outdoor dog-kennel run, purchase a sheet(s) of hog fencing as a cover over the dog-kennel run, doghouse, indoor xx-large wire crate and any other equipment needed for this long-term project.

On Feb. 24, 2016, Director and Shelter Manager Tisha Jackson met with Sandy, a professional dog trainer, to inform her of the grant and Sandy was thrilled. Tisha and Sandy have discussed this project for years. The kennel will be set up on Sandy's farm at her choice of location. The project will allow Sandy to train one dog at a time from CARRMISSOURI. Sandy will ensure each dog has basic obedience skills and determine which skills the dog excels at and train the dog in that area.

Tisha and Sandy discussed the various skills most sought in the Midwest, which include:
1) Search and rescue with various specialized elements: scent-trailing (air and water)
2) PTSD therapy/assistance dogs
3) Contraband-sniffing dogs (possibly for TSA, law enforcement, etc.)
4) Farm assistance dogs (dogs trained to assist farmers with disabilities): These dogs not only assist in herding various livestock but have the skills to pick up and retrieve items for the farmer in addition to seeking another human for assistance in emergencies

Sandy will have full authority to decide what training each dog receives, as she will have the dog on her farm 24/7 and be better capable of determining the strong skills and aptitude of the dog. Sandy was thrilled to be able to make this decision based on the skill sets the dog excels at (in the past when training dogs for others she had strict instructions as to what the dog MUST do; we feel since she has 40 years experience and is the true professional in training dogs that this decision is hers to make. Needless to say, she was extremely excited.)

For 2017 we will plan for her to have one dog at a time and there will be no time limit, again, as she is the professional, not us. Each dog will be completely vetted prior to being sent to her. The dogs will be on preventatives for fleas, ticks and heartworms, for which we will provide the monthly medications. In addition, we will provide the food, treats and any other supplies or equipment that she needs to be successful in training the dog. Currently (this month) she is meeting with each of our foster homes and meeting each dog and by the end of the month she will select which dog she wants to work with first.

At the end of the month, Tisha will visit Sandy at her farm and Sandy will have selected where she wants the outdoor kennel set up. We are hoping (pending weather) to be able to start pouring concrete or gravel by mid-April. Tisha has asked Sandy to accompany her the first week of April to go look at some different-style kennels that are available in the KCMO area. Once Sandy has selected her preference, then Tisha will purchase them and have them moved to her farm; that way, when the concrete or gravel is done, the kennel can be set up. Once the kennel area has been set up, then a date will be selected that is good for Sandy for Tisha to go get her selected canine to start training.

Sandy estimates she will need 10-14 days to evaluate the dog on her property to determine which training she will be providing for that dog and then will let Tisha know. By having the dog at Sandy's farm, the dog will receive training every single day and throughout the day. There are elements that Sandy has requested Tisha help with, such as when doing a search-and-rescue real-world training (scent or air), volunteers will be needed who will follow Sandy's directions to a T and Tisha will provide the volunteers.

Sandy has also asked for access to property that has woods and water, and Tisha owns property that is 40 acres of woods and a 15-acre private lake. Sandy was thrilled, as this will help with water search-and-rescue. Sandy has also asked Tisha to sponsor her under CARRMISSOURI with the DEA for contraband samples when dogs are being trained for contraband searches; again, Tisha will provide this, and since Sandy and Tisha have both had DEA clearance in the past, applying will not be an issue. Sandy has also asked for a traveling plastic kennel when she needs to take the dog on car rides and Tisha will provide one (we do not need to purchase as we have many xx-large plastic crates).

The foster homes have been doing a great job the past year with following Tisha's requirements of basic home skills, socialization and interactions, so this will help Sandy tremendously with our current dogs in being able to focus on more-specialized training. This requirement will continue and possibly the skill sets will be increased as we move along.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

We do not have one actual dog finished yet to truly spotlight, however, we know that having dogs that are professionally trained in careers will increase their adoptions into the appropriate industries, thereby taking these dogs who were homeless and giving them a true occupation. The long-term goal will be to bring on several volunteers or paid staff to work directly with Sandy so that Sandy can teach them her techniques so that her knowledge can live on and not be lost. Sandy is 70 years old currently and extremely active (she is retired but continues to operate her own working farm, occasionally assist the FBI with cold cases on search and rescue with her canine and demos of her trained dogs) but we both (Sandy and Tisha) agree that there will be a day that Sandy can no longer work with dogs and Tisha is determined to ensure that Sandy's awesome training techniques become a true legacy carried on for future generations. We will continue to provide updates this year on this project. We will also send you pictures once we have the kennel set up and pictures of training, etc. We truly can't thank you enough for giving us this truly awesome opportunity to finally make this dream of Sandy and Tisha's happen -- after all, it's the rescued dogs who are going to win big!

How many pets did this grant help?

We don't know yet, but hope at least five dogs this year.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Still to be determined. We will share pictures once we have officially started this project which is anticipated to be at the end of April, pending the weather. Pictured is Pete. From his Petfinder profile: "Pete, border collie-heeler mix. 62 lbs. Average energy. Thank YOU for checking me out. Loves car rides and going for walks. Needs adopter who will provide lots of activities and attention. Has been given successful home skills, leash training and basic obedience training." Meet Pete: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34973298

Animatch, Inc.: Petfinder Adoption Options in Action Grant (Invitation Only)
What was the money or product used for?

Animatch was in need of new transport crates to replace the old, broken, and rusted ones.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant helped Animatch buy new transport crates. Being a small shelter, we make weekly trips to our veterinarian. Without adequate crates, it means that some dogs would not be able to make the trip. The new crates mean that Animatch can now take on and help more dogs in need, and ensure that they are seen by our vet without delay.

How many pets did this grant help?

We have included the stories of the three dogs who were the most in need of these crates for vet care. However, this grant will continue to help ensure that all dogs in our shelter will receive the veterinary care necessary.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Boris (first photo), Charley (second photo) and Peewee (third photo) are three senior dogs who were flown to Montreal by volunteer pilots from a rescue hundreds of miles away. The dogs were then picked up at the airport by more volunteers and brought to Animatch. The trio required extensive veterinary care, which Animatch provided. They are all feeling so much better now, and are ready to live their golden years in good health with loving families! Peewee has already been adopted, and it won't be long for Charley and Boris. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation's Adoption Options in Action grant, these dogs were able to travel by plane and car in safe, secure dog carriers!

Meet Boris: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37353137
Meet Charley: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37350884

Saving Shepherds of Minnesota: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used to help pay for a femoral-head ostectomy surgery on a young new mother whom we had recently taken into rescue.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The money awarded through the grant helped us tremendously. We are a small, breed-specific rescue that has only been in operation for 16 months. Without the grant, Maddie may have had to wait longer, and in pain, to get the surgery she needed to correct her hip dysplasia. Correcting the issue means Maddie is now on her way to healing and hopefully will be ready to be adopted in the near future.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

We were notified about two stray German shepherds who were in a shelter in Texas and told the mother dog was currently in labor, giving birth. We immediately started working to secure a foster in Texas so the dogs could be pulled. We welcomed mama Maddie, her newborn pup, Fischer, and a young female believed to be an older pup of Maddie's named Mia into the Saving Shepherds of MN family on Jan. 6, 2017. When the trio made their way up to Minnesota, it became apparent that Maddie had significant pain while walking. We scheduled her to be spayed and to have x-rays done. We discovered two things that day: First, that Maddie's uterus had ruptured while she gave birth to Fischer. There were likely more puppies who didn't survive, and the veterinarian was amazed that Maddie had made it through the ordeal. Second, Maddie had severe dysplasia in one of her hips.

Femoral-head ostectomy surgery is very expensive. Maddie is the sweetest dog and has had so much working against her in her young life (we believe she is around 2). We were committed to helping her feel the best she could and to helping find her the perfect home. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation's Orvis Operational Grant, Maddie was able to have surgery and is recovering very well. We are hoping she will be ready for adoption in the near future once her rehabilitation is completed.

Cocheco Valley Humane Society: KONG Toy Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Kongs were used for enrichment for the dogs in the shelter. We received 30 and each dog has been given a Kong and when they are adopted they take it with them.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The dogs can be very stressed and bored here at the shelter, so the Kongs are a great way for them to get playtime without staff or volunteers being with them. We use the Kongs for enrichment as well. We use treats, peanut butter and cream cheese in them. They provide hours of entertainment and help the time pass between walks and enrichment time.

How many pets did this grant help?

30 dogs have been helped.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Sweet Pea was a transport dog from one of the [open-admission] shelters in the South. She was a very timid 5- or 6-year-old pit bull. She was so scared when we got her that we put her in an administrative employee's office so that she would not be stressed out even more in the noisy shelter. We made a nice soft bed for her and gave her a Kong with peanut butter and kibble in it. She would not even look at it at first. Each day we all took time to talk to her and pet her and just give her love. She stopped shaking so much and started to show interest in her Kong. From then on, she was hooked. She was a bit lazy and would push the Kong with her paw while lying down and ignore it if something did not fall out. Then she learned that if she rolled it more aggressively, she would be rewarded! She and her Kong have been adopted into a new forever home and she has a furry brother who just adores her. She is one happy dog!

Five Acres Animal Shelter: Orvis Animal Care Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Grant funding received from the Petfinder Foundation and Orvis were used to purchase microchips to be implanted into our adoptable dogs.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This grant provided funding for Five Acres Animal Shelter to purchase 100 microchips to implant in 100 of our adoptable dogs. All of our animals are microchipped before they are adopted. Our hope is that if an animal were to get away from their new family, he or she will be less likely to end up back in a shelter due to the family's not being able to track the pet down. If one of our alumni is found and his or her chip is scanned, it will be registered back to us or the new family, leading to a successful reunion.

How many pets did this grant help?

100

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lucky (first photo) is a beagle who was adopted from us recently. He got away from his owners and was picked up by a local animal-control facility. They scanned him for a microchip, which was registered to Five Acres Animal Shelter. After we picked him up and brought him back to our facility, we were able to contact his family and reunite him with them. Because Lucky had a registered microchip, we were able to help prevent him from entering a shelter once again as a homeless pet.

Juna was adopted in April 2016 by a large family with six kids, as you can see in the second photo. All of our animals are microchipped before they are adopted in hopes that they will not end up back in a shelter unclaimed or unidentified. Now, we cannot confirm that Juna has gotten away from her family, but with a family of six children, the possibility of that happening could be greater with kids in and out of a house. If, God forbid, Juna does get away from her family, she is microchipped to either her owners or Five Acres Animal Shelter so that we can successfully reunite them if needed.