Success Stories

Here are some examples of how your donations are helping shelters and rescue groups, in the organizations’ own words.

MEOW Cat Rescue: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

MEOW Canine Division rescued several dogs from a life-threatening situation in South Korea during the holidays in 2015. Many had health issues, but Oliver Twist was one of the most challenged. In addition to being born with a cleft palate and without eyes, he had severe heartworm. This money helped with his treatment.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The generous gift sent in honor of Oliver Twist was used to help fund his heartworm treatment, a long and difficult task.

How many pets did this grant help?

One very special dog was cured of severe heartworm. Oliver Twist says thank you!

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

MEOW Canine Division rescued several dogs from a life-threatening situation in South Korea during the holidays of 2015. From the photo of this Chow Chow sent in advance, we knew of his cleft palate, and we had been told of his severe heartworm, but we did not know until we met him that Oliver had been born without eyes. Unaware that he is different, Oliver is a happy, confident dog who bonds easily with women but is unsure of men. The generous gift sent in honor of Oliver Twist was used to help treat his heartworm, a difficult task. We're happy to report that his treatment was successful. While getting healthy, Oliver was fostered by a kind woman who promised to get him through, get him ready for adoption and then kiss him goodbye. She was able to follow through on the first two of these, but when it was time for Oliver to be interviewed by a prospective adopter, with tears in her voice she simply said, "Oliver is my dog. Oliver is my dog." He has a wonderful home with her for life.

Friends of the Animals Foundation: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The money was used for medical care.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The money was used to help fund spay/neuter surgery.

How many pets did this grant help?

It helped two cats.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Fluffy and his sister Randi were strays, living in the parking lot of a local apartment complex. Their caretaker reached out for help in getting them homes.

Bunny World Foundation: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The total donation of $45 (donations made to Bunny World Foundation in Q2 2016) was used to pay the medical bill for Holly at Northwood Animal Hospital. The total for the invoice was $195.26. Every bit counts and the donation was applied towards Holly's balance to cover her exam and medication necessary for Holly's recovery.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The donation covered much-needed meds for Holly, a disabled 8-year-old rabbit: Metacam, Neo-Predef Powder and Silver Sulfadiazine Cream. This was needed for Holly's recovery. Holly had her toe amputated and the meds were needed once the sutures were removed.

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Holly had all sorts of issues in 2016: toe amputation, ulcers in the corneas of both her eyes, disability, incontinence, and more. She's our "million-dollar baby"! She's been getting into and out of trouble on regular basis. Somehow, she'd always come out of the battle victorious. The zeal to LIVE and to THRIVE and to RISE from the ashes has been the theme of Holly's bunny life. We're thrilled to report that Holly has landed the best home ever and a husbun to boot! :) Thanks for all your help.

Bunny World Foundation: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The total of $22.50 (a donation made to Bunny World Foundation in the second quarter of 2016) was used to pay the medical bill at Northwood Animal Hospital for Lavender, Lucia, Olive, Orangina, and William. The total for the invoice was $1,184.41. Every penny counts and this amount was applied to the balance. Thank you!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our foster system is constantly receiving newcomers who need medical assistance. Almost every rabbit that we accept into our family needs some type of medical treatment, or at least an initial exam. Every exam we pay for is $25, so this donation helped cover one of the exams for the bunnies being seen that day: Lavender!

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lavender was rescued as a 10-day-old baby from the streets of Santee Alley in downtown Los Angeles. He was in Bunny World Foundation foster care for a few years until finally, it happened! The most amazing family of three decided to add No. 4, a bunny, to the mix and Lavender was chosen. The handsome blue Rex with the most loving and playful personality was introduced to the crowd and they embraced him wholeheartedly. They have been living happily ever after since their mom and dad (Jenny and Ernie) added Lavender to their gorgeous family! The medical bill that BWF covered with help from this donation helped give Lavender a CLEAN bill of health and made him super adoptable. :)

Animal Friends Furever: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

Vet bill

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Helped pay a vet bill

How many pets did this grant help?

One

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

A cat was very sick and started having seizures she had to be put down. Sadly that is what the money went for. The cat sponsored was Fiona (pictured). From her Petfinder profile: "Fiona is a very sweet, talkative and affectionate 3-year-old girl. She is shy with strangers, but once she knows you, she is outgoing and playful. She loves to be held and to snuggle next to you in bed at night. She is a petite girl, tipping the scales at 7 lbs. Fiona was born without eyelids, and a very kind sponsor paid for her to have reconstructive surgery that saved her one eye and relieved her from constant pain. Due to an infection before she was brought into rescue, the second eye could not be saved. She would do fine with 1-2 younger playful kitties or older, laid-back cats. For more information about Fiona, please contact suzzyq075@aol.com. She is located in Warminster, PA, outside of Philadelphia. Adoption area included eastern PA, south and central NJ." Meet Fiona: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/36274590

Forgotten Felines & Fidos, Inc.: Petfinder 20th Anniversary Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The Petfinder 20th Anniversary grant money was used to pay for medical expenses, food, and litter for our shelter and foster cats.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

The grant money covered the medical costs of some of our shelter cats, as well as foster cats who needed a variety of medical treatment ranging from dental work to enucleations to treatment for illnesses. This funding helped improve the health of some of our shelter cats and gave them a chance to find the forever homes that they deserved! Thank you, Petfinder Foundation!

How many pets did this grant help?

The grant money covered the medical costs for 10 cats and also helped support our shelter cats with food and litter.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Buford (first photo) is a 9-month-old black domestic medium-hair who needed eye enucleation. By providing financial assistance to a low-income family, we uncovered a hoarding situation with 20 neglected cats. The situation had prompted them to start bringing the cats in to our low-cost spay/neuter program. They had no money to alter their animals, let alone provide them medical treatment. Buford was one of the worst off, with a deformed eye that may have been the result of inbreeding. But he had also endured months of an upper-respiratory infection which caused a terrible ulcer, and an infection in his good eye. This eye had to be removed, leaving him with what he basically had anyway: the ability to possibly see only shadows and light. He is thriving. He jumps up on the bed and is walking around exploring without bumping into anything. With his wonderful personality, he is a great candidate for adoption. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation for this grant, which has helped us tremendously. This came at a perfect time, right as we incurred a massive expense with just this one group of needy cats.

Josh (second photo) is a 10-month-old black-and-white domestic longhair who needed a consult, endoscopy, biopsy, and two surgeries. While implementing TNR near a local home, we were made aware that cats were mysteriously disappearing. Whether it was due to predators or poisoning, we attempted to save what friendly cats we could. Josh was the only one friendly enough that he could be adopted -- that was, until he began to decline physically. He had bordetella virus as well as a polyp in each ear. From August 2016 to March 24, 2017, he has been under anesthesia four times to either scope or operate, with trips to a specialist who had the tools to perform the surgeries. Now, after his ordeal, he is finally starting to put on weight and grow. His growth was stunted due to lack of oxygen, as the polyps had blocked his nasal flow. His lazy eye (Horner's syndrome, a side effect of the ear polyps) has even corrected. He resides with his foster family, where he is a therapy cat for a young boy battling Crohn's disease. We thank the Petfinder Foundation for allowing us to follow through with Josh's care!

Mylie (third photo) is a 2-year-old gray tiger domestic shorthair who needed eye enucleation. Mylie came in as a stray to be spayed through our low-cost program but had no home. We took her in because her eye would have been a disability for a life outside. It looked damaged, as if scarred from a fight. We were advised it was an old injury and she was adopted quickly. Thanks to our return policy, she was brought back after only one year due to a new baby in the home. However, even though she had lost her home, it was her lucky day. That old injury had progressed into something serious and she had a slightly enlarged globe. Upon exam, fluid was found behind the eye which was precancerous if the eye remained. Mylie had her eye enucleated with help from the Petfinder Foundation grant. Before her surgery, she was visited by a wonderful family. She climbed on their chests and snuggled as though she had never left home. Her new home is waiting for her while she recovers from her surgery, and it is clear she will have her forever home. Thank you, Petfinder Foundation, for helping with this unexpected and emergency surgery!

Pilar (fourth photo) is a 1½-year-old tortoise domestic shorthair with allergies. Pilar was trapped at a large feral colony at an industrial site in Palmerton in January 2016. She was very sick and required weeks of medical care before returning to good health. She had little fur on her hind legs, bottom and stomach, and was missing patches from her front legs. This was a result of excessive licking. In May 2016 she was taken into a foster home to work on increasing her social skills. FF&F consulted with a local vet to address the hair loss. Upon the vet's recommendation, the foster family started Pilar on a unique protein diet (lamb and duck) and added fish oil and Rescue Remedy to her diet. Nothing seemed to help with the licking and she developed a lump on her chin. Pilar returned to the vet, who now suspected allergies. She was given a steroid shot and will be monitored over the next few weeks. Further testing may be needed to identify specific allergens. Pilar is awaiting her forever home. For more information about Pilar, check out her Petfinder listing: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34633593

Screwball (fifth photo) is a 1- to 2-year-old female. This neglected cat was brought into our low-cost spay program severely underweight, pregnant, and suffering from an eye that had ruptured with infection. She had lived with an upper-respiratory virus that eventually destroyed her eye. Her bad eye was removed and, after a long bout of antibiotics, this young cat is back to feeling like herself: playful and energetic and ready for a real home. As we continue to address the other cats in that home, we are grateful for the Petfinder Foundation grant that has aided us in this work. We are very aware that Screwball may have had to be euthanized if funds were not there to remove her eye. Meet Screwball: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/37709575

Smokey (sixth photo) is a 10-year-old male who needed a dental. Smokey was a semi-friendly outside cat being fed and cared for by a shelter volunteer. The volunteer noticed on several occasions that Smokey was injured and took him to FF&F for medical treatment. Apparently, Smokey was being attacked by another animal. The shelter manager recognized that he was no longer able to fend for himself outside and, since the volunteer already had many indoor cats, she offered to take him into the shelter in hopes he would be adopted. As Smokey aged, he required dental care on several occasions. He developed a severe case of stomatitis. On Feb. 10, 2017, the last of his teeth were extracted and he is currently on medication to treat this condition. Smokey is a friendly senior cat who still has many years to give to a loving family willing to adopt him. He is available for adoption through FF&F's Seniors for Seniors Program.

Zelina is a 3-year-old black domestic shorthair who needed an exam and biopsy. Zelina was abandoned at the end of our driveway in a carrier with a note. Her owner had passed away and the cat had nowhere to go. The note stated there was an ongoing skin issue and that Zelina received monthly steroid injections. This friendly cat is enduring much discomfort and continually wears an Elizabethan collar to prevent her from mutilating herself. Our soonest appointment for an allergist will be in April. She is a sweet girl. Thank you to the Petfinder Foundation grant that will enable us to do a comprehensive exam so we can hopefully cure her once and for all.

Frances R. Willis SPCA: Petfinder 20th Anniversary Grant
What was the money or product used for?

Frances R. Willis SPCA is going through a rebrand in the community and we have made a commitment towards ending euthanasia in Dorchester County. Since we are the only open-admission shelter in Dorchester, we have historically been a high-kill shelter. Thanks to several partners and new staffing, we are making great strides with this movement. One big step was having our employees take pride in where they worked. Thanks to the Petfinder Foundation grant, our organization was able to outfit each employee with two pairs of scrubs, a slip lead and nametag. We have 22 employees at the SPCA, and having each one in a uniform has brought a new spirit to the team. It also helps the public recognize who is staff and to who they should address questions. This was a $2,200 investment.

Secondly, heartworm disease is on the rise in South Carolina and it is rampant in our shelter. With this additional funding, we have been able to purchase Immiticide and start the very expensive and time-consuming process of treating the live heartworms. This goes hand-in-hand with our efforts to work towards ending euthanasia. Historically, testing positive would mean an automatic death sentence; now we are able to provide the necessary injections and we've had great results. Ultimately we are able to adopt the animal to a forever home! Purchasing Immiticide was a $5,000 investment.

Lastly, we take in all different types of cases -- pets with broken bones or gunshot wounds, who are abused or emaciated -- the list goes on. We have an emergency medical fund called Michael's Healing Heart that provides for ANY animal who needs specialized care that we cannot provide onsite. Lily, whose story is below, is a Michael's Healing Heart dog who was helped by this grant.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Our capacity at Frances R. Willis is 78 dog runs. On any given day, we typically have more than 100 dogs on campus and nearly 100 dogs in foster. Approximately 25% of our dog population tests positive for heartworm disease. We follow the National Heartworm Society guidelines of three shots of Immiticide and, therefore, one bottle does not last long! For the first time in over 40 years, we are finally able to spend some funds on treatment! We were also able to help one of our Michael's Healing Heart cases; for her, this funding saved her life.

How many pets did this grant help?

This grant will be providing heartworm treatment for approximately 20 large-breed dogs and 10 small-breed dogs. The grant also funded part of Lily's surgery.

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Lily, a Boston terrier mix, was brought to us in early March by a good Samaritan who found her as a stray on the side of the road. Because Lily had no use of her back legs and was clearly hurt, her rescuer rushed her to our shelter so we could take care of her. Initially we thought there was a pelvic fracture, but after her initial examination and x-rays, it was determined that she was suffering from two fractures. She ended up needing a bilateral femoral head ostectomy, and this required a specialist. We were able to have Lily's surgery done, which was a $4,000 investment, and Lily is recovering in the care of a foster family that is likely to adopt her!

Humane Society of Kandiyohi & Meeker Counties: Petfinder 20th Anniversary Grant
What was the money or product used for?

The $10,000 20th Anniversary Grant was a very nice surprise for our organization. In 2016, 1,567 animals came through our shelter doors. While some came in in pretty good shape, there were those who needed extra medical attention. The money was used to help care for those with special needs and to help us with pets coming into the shelter in 2017 with special needs. Whether it was a surgery to correct a medical abnormality or medication for a medical condition, we work very hard at "fixing" an animal up so that its quality of life is improved.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

In 2016 we incurred an additional $7,247 in fees for animals who needed extra medical care. We had a dog whom we treated for parvovirus. One dog needed to be hospitalized for canine distemper. We repaired a torn ligament (ACL) on a larger dog. We treated several for skin conditions and other maladies. While we do not know what 2017 will bring, just having the extra money will help us help them.

How many pets did this grant help?

1,567

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Murphy the bulldog (first photo) came in with severe skin issues. He was placed on an expensive medication. He did get adopted and his new owner continues to give him his medications. He is a great pet!

Elora (second photo) was treated for parvovirus. At our last check, she is doing very well with her young family. Barron, a yellow Lab who passed all of the tests for being a therapy dog, but failed the medical portion due to his bad knee/torn ACL, did go on to be a therapy dog and visits with local veterans.

Betty, a young female pit bull terrier (third photo), is in a foster home. She is on special medication for her skin allergies. She is on Petfinder and is currently looking for her forever home. Meet Betty: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/35548297.

Eleven and her baby kittens are currently in foster care. They are being treated for coccidia and are on their way to becoming great pets.

THANK YOU SO MUCH for helping us help them!

Better Days Animal League: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

The Sponsor a Pet donation of $50 for Auburn went toward our animal-care costs. Auburn requires specific food that is purchased by the organization, joint supplements, etc., so this fund specifically goes to her care and costs too!

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

This was a $50 Sponsor a Pet donation. These funds go toward our costs related to veterinary and animal-care expenses.

How many pets did this grant help?

1

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Auburn is still in need of a home! She either needs to be a single pet or be adopted by a family local enough that we can try to find a compatible match. From her Petfinder profile: "Auburn was rescued from another shelter in the summer of 2007. Auburn is no beauty queen, but what a sweet girl! She loves to cuddle and get belly rubs, and she'll do anything for a treat! When Auburn sees a car, she is ready to climb on in and go for a ride. She's beginning to slow down in her older years and is on joint supplements to help with her aging bones. Having called a kennel home for so many years, Auburn's dream would be a soft and warm bed for her remaining years! Although Auburn has mellowed out over the past few years, we believe she would do best as an only pet. She has plenty of love to give on her own!" Meet Auburn: www.petfinder.com/petdetail/12404466

Jackson Madison County Humane Society: Sponsor a Pet
What was the money or product used for?

We used the donated money to help purchase Henry's heartworm prevention plus have somebody come down and give him a good haircut.

How did this grant help your organization and the pets in your care?

Heartworm prevention and grooming.

How many pets did this grant help?

One: Henry

Please provide a story of one or more specific pets this grant helped.

Henry arrived at our shelter on Sept. 29, 2016, as an owner surrender. He was one of the lucky adults. Henry only spent about one month here and was adopted to a wonderful woman who just fell in love with him when she saw him, and he responded to her too. He was very easy to housetrain, she said, even though he had always been an outside dog. Henry is being spoiled rotten in his new loving and forever home.